Threads

Topics

Usernames

Mumsnet Logo
Please
or
to access all these features

WEBCHAT GUIDELINES: 1. One question per member plus one follow-up. 2. Keep your question brief. 3. Don't moan if your question doesn't get answered. 4. Do be civil/polite. 5. If one topic or question threatens to overwhelm the webchat, MNHQ will usually ask for people to stop repeating the same question or point.

Brexit: where are we? What could happen next? Webchat with three experts on Tuesday 27 November at 1.30pm
234

RowanMumsnet · 26/11/2018 08:17

Hello

We’re pleased to announce a webchat on Brexit, the ‘divorce’ agreement, and possible outcomes, with three guests from The UK in a Changing Europe on Tuesday 27 November at 1.30pm.

Professor Jonathan Portes is senior fellow at The UK in a Changing Europe and Professor of Economics and Public Policy in the Department of Political Economy at King's College London. Previously, he was principal research fellow of the National Institute of Economic & Social Research. Before that he was chief economist at the Cabinet Office, and previous to that chief economist at the Department of Work and Pensions.


Professor Catherine Barnard is senior fellow at The UK in a Changing Europe; Professor in European Union Law and Employment Law at the University of Cambridge; and senior tutor and fellow of Trinity College. Catherine specialises in EU law and employment law.


Professor Anand Menon is Director of The UK in a Changing Europe and Professor of European Politics and Foreign Affairs at Kings College London. He has held positions at Sciences Po, Columbia University and NYU. He has written on many aspects of contemporary Europe and is a frequent commentator on national and international media.

Professors Menon and Barnard joined us before the Brexit referendum in June 2016 - you can check out that webchat here if you fancy refreshing your memory/reliving the heady atmosphere.

Please do join the chat on Tuesday. If you can’t make it, please leave a question here in advance. Do bear in mind the webchat guidelines - one question each (follow-ups allowed if there’s time), and please be polite. Also following recent chats/guest posts we’ve updated our guidelines to let people know that, if one topic is overwhelmingly dominating a discussion with a guest, mods might request that people don't continue to post what's effectively the same question or point. Rest assured we will ALWAYS let guests know that it's an area of concern to multiple users and will encourage them to engage with those questions.

Thanks
MNHQ

Brexit: where are we? What could happen next? Webchat with three experts on Tuesday 27 November at 1.30pm
Please
or
to access all these features

bellinisurge · 26/11/2018 08:37

Regardless of the merits of the deal (just for once!) how can we avoid No Deal if this deal doesn't get through either our Parliament or any of the other member states' parliaments.

Please
or
to access all these features

WhatdoImean · 26/11/2018 09:08

What would you assess the probability of the government successfully getting the proposed deal through the House of Commons? And if not, what are the most likely outcomes?

Please
or
to access all these features

DeloresJaneUmbridge · 26/11/2018 09:09

We've heard a great deal about Project Fear. What in your opinion will happen if we have no Deal?

Please
or
to access all these features

Havanananana · 26/11/2018 09:26

‘No Deal’ – i.e. leaving the EU with no agreement and no transition on 29th March – will result in damaging disruption. The food industry, supermarkets, water utilities and pharmaceutical companies fear that supplies would run out in a matter of days and shortages would last for months. Manufacturing would come to a halt as components and materials stop arriving and finished goods cannot be exported. There is a real risk of civil unrest.

If Parliament votes against the Withdrawal Agreement, and ‘No Deal’ would be catastrophic, does Parliament then have a legal and moral obligation to act in the best interests of the country – i.e. request that the UK be permitted to withdraw the Art 50 notification and remain in the EU ?

Please
or
to access all these features

Bowchicawowow · 26/11/2018 09:51

I would like to ask Jonathan Portes if he understands why socially and economically deprived areas of the UK voted to leave and what he thinks can be done to help these places in the future? In particular how can we give the children living in these areas greater social mobility.

Please
or
to access all these features

2beesornot2beesthatisthehoney · 26/11/2018 10:03

So Catherine Bernard and Anand Menon, looking back to your previous webcast on Mumsnet, is Brexit turning out like you thought or hoped it might?

Jonathon Portes , we haven’t heard your view before but feel free to chip in!

Please
or
to access all these features

arranfan · 26/11/2018 10:08

It doesn't feel as if we're in a position where we're adequately prepared for a No Deal yet it seems unlikely that Mrs May has sufficient support to pass her deal.

Is it feasible to abandon the Article 50 process, and for the UK and EU to negotiate the withdrawal and relationship agreement together as a single treaty, for as long as it takes? Or is the option to this something to Norway+

Please
or
to access all these features

lljkk · 26/11/2018 11:18

Can someone explain Canada-plus-plus in simple brief terms, why do some leavers (eg Michael Howard) like C++ so much, did a EU negotiator really offer Canada++ early on AND (most importantly) is there a version of Canada++ that would solve the Northern Ireland challenges while satisfying the Good Friday agreement terms & DUP's current demands for post-Brexit conditions?

Please
or
to access all these features

arranfan · 26/11/2018 11:26

My follow-up question:

Does the panel have an opinion on whether the Brexit issues will effectively be moot if a near-time climate change-driven switch away from fossil fuels means the worldwide economy/trading will need to change radically and what those economic/social/political changes would look like?

Please
or
to access all these features

Yaralie · 26/11/2018 11:27

Is we get a People's vote, how can we avoid our democracy being highjacked yet again by malign forces persuading gullible people to believe their lies?

Please
or
to access all these features

LaDaronne · 26/11/2018 11:47

What is to become of British citizens in Europe whose jobs depend on having European nationality? I'm thinking in particular of 1700 civil servants in France, but I'm sure there are others too.

Please
or
to access all these features

TheyBuiltThePyramids · 26/11/2018 11:52

What is to happen to those many workers who depend on cross border travel for work, or whose contracts are at risk once they are no longer EU citizens? Manu EU companies are obliged to hire EU contractors/firms first before looking outside.

Please
or
to access all these features

DeloresJaneUmbridge · 26/11/2018 13:15

Hava yes I get all that and I voted Remain, I am concerned about the implications of No Deal and so asked the question as I would like to hear what the three guests think as opposed to MN Leavers who shriek Projct Fear when anyone attempts to say what you did here,

I guess my question to them is “should we be very wary of No Deal and are people right to be worried?”

Please
or
to access all these features

PigletJohn · 26/11/2018 13:26

We have a negotiated deal, that we can accept or not accept.

Is it realistic to think that some other deal might appear before we leave?

Please
or
to access all these features

QuentinLettsisAbitofAtool · 26/11/2018 13:40

Do you think we should have a People's Vote?

Please
or
to access all these features

NoughtDegreesNought · 26/11/2018 13:45

What are the legal implications of people like me being 100% disenfranchised as a result of Brexit? Travesty of justice and democracy IMO but what does EU/international law say?

(Background: Brit citizen living in other EU country 25 yrs, married to EU national, children dual nationality - denied vote in referendum and no longer have voting rights in UK due to 15-year rule, Brexit will additionally mean no more vote in EU elections or local elections in my country of residence either - taking citizenship here not an option as country I reside in doesn't allow dual nationality except by birth.)

Please
or
to access all these features

Talkinpeece · 26/11/2018 13:56

Do you think that Brexit will actually solve any of the UK's Socioeconomic issues that led to the Leave vote?

  • housing ; both social and private
  • zero hours contracts / low pay / Universal credit
  • austerity impacting on health, education and local services
    If so how?
Please
or
to access all these features

Quietrebel · 26/11/2018 14:35

If A50 was revoked before March 29th (assuming it can and that we end up in such a situation) would the UK remain under the exact same terms it currently enjoys?

Please
or
to access all these features

Talkstotrees · 26/11/2018 14:49

Given where we are now - and taking into consideration how we got here - what, do you think, is the best outcome we (the UK) can hope for? And how, as members of the public, can we help to achieve this ‘best outcome’?

Thank you

Please
or
to access all these features

Chocolala · 26/11/2018 15:16

Assuming no deal: can the UK be forced (due to its obligations under the GFA not to have a hard border on the island of Ireland) to install a border in the Irish Sea?

Please
or
to access all these features

newyorkartist · 26/11/2018 15:23

  • The referendum was advisory not binding, and yet on the say-so of only one man (David Cameron) it was effectively rendered binding.
  • The campaign period included certain reassurances (e.g. that we would not leave the single market or customs union even if we voted to leave the EU) that have not been honoured.
  • The Leave campaign contained a slew of demonstrable untruths and misrepresentations and is still the subject of a criminal investigation.
  • All of this was brought to us by a Conservative governement that might not have won a Commons majority in 2015 if their election expenses improprieties had come to light sooner (or had not taken place), some of which are still sub judice.

    With all of this in mind, how can the invoking of Article 50 and the looming consequence of a default departure from the EU on 29 March be occurring lawfully? Why is it not all regarded as the fruit of the poisonous tree, so to speak?
Please
or
to access all these features

LaDaronne · 26/11/2018 15:58

You have my sympathy NoughtDegrees. I'm disenfranchised too but at least I can request dual nationality.

Please
or
to access all these features

Tiscold · 26/11/2018 16:17

What did you vote? Are these experts impartial or are they allowing their baises via ehat they voted for affect their judgement?

Please
or
to access all these features

DeloresJaneUmbridge · 26/11/2018 17:05

Good question Tiscold

Please
or
to access all these features

Talkstotrees · 26/11/2018 17:37

I disagree - I would expect that their votes were decided by expert analysis of the situation. Accusing experts of bias is nonsense - their position is based on their expertise, not vice versa.

Please
or
to access all these features
Please create an account

To comment on this thread you need to create a Mumsnet account.