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AIBU?

to refer to 11/9 rather than 9/11

136 replies

LargeDeviation · 11/09/2022 12:45

The growing Americanisation of our language seems to have accelerated massively over the last few years. I see 'mom' scrawled with abandon all over Mumsnet. Schoolchildren regularly refer to 'math'.

Yes, what happened on Sept 11 2001 was utterly tragic, and I am not seeking to cause anyone pain, but for some reason the totally illogical American date format really annoys me, even more than seeing a fine word lose its 'u'. Month/Day/Year - how can that possibly make any type of sense????

It's now long enough ago that when I talk about it to others, it causes them to stop for a moment and think - and thinking consciously about the loss of British English is maybe the first step to preserving it.

OP posts:

Am I being unreasonable?

581 votes. Final results.

POLL
You are being unreasonable
94%
You are NOT being unreasonable
6%
pickledpotato · 11/09/2022 12:46

YABU

Also you'll see 'mom' written across MN as many people up north use this instead of mum

Plus it's an international site you doughnut

TeenDivided · 11/09/2022 12:47
  1. 9/11 is what it is called in the USA, where it happened, so it is not unreasonable to call it that.
  2. Mom is a regional thing in some parts of the uK
  3. I am with you on 'math'. Urgh!
PinkyFlamingo · 11/09/2022 12:47

You can refer to it like that if you want, doubt anyone else will. You sound very pompous.

Saturdaydreamingway2355555 · 11/09/2022 12:48

It’s their tragedy not ours, if it was here we’d called it 11/9, but it wasn’t….. it was in America. It’s 9/11 and always will be

ForTheLoveOfSleep · 11/09/2022 12:48

For gad sake just say September 11th if it's that much of an issue for you

Burnt0utMum · 11/09/2022 12:48

It happened in the US. They can call it what they want and it wouldn't make sense for the UK to adopt a different name for it.

OriginalUsername3 · 11/09/2022 12:49

It happened in America.

MrsElm · 11/09/2022 12:49

It happened in America therefore they get to decide how to refer to it. And it has been referred to as 9/11 for over 20 years.
If you call it 11/9, at best you will invite blank looks, at worst you will seem like a loon.

Floydthebarber · 11/09/2022 12:49

Mom is common in parts of the Midlands, it is not new or an Americanism. It is 9/11 as that is the name that was given by country where the tragedy happened. You can call it 11/09 but people will think of you as a bit of a pretentious knob.

FourTeaFallOut · 11/09/2022 12:49

I think it's a bit rude to be having a pedant shit fit over something like this.

Legomania · 11/09/2022 12:50

Have you been living under a rock for the past 20 years?!

NuffSaidSam · 11/09/2022 12:51

I think when you talk about things that happened in other countries it's normal to use their terminology. I don't necessarily disagree with you about the Americanisation of British English, but this is an odd choice imo.

Mom is used in many British dialects, not just in America. Also, it's an international site so you'll see Mom used for that reason.

I don't like Math. That's a better place to start your protest than 9/11.

EmptyHouse0822 · 11/09/2022 12:51

You’re being ridiculous about 9/11 ….. it’s the name of the tragedy that happened in their Country.

Im from the Midlands and I call my mother “mom”, like everyone else does who lives here, and in many other parts of England too.

IHopeYouStepOnALegPiece · 11/09/2022 12:51

You sound like a stuck up idiot.


You realise Mom isn’t an Americanisation? You realise it is actually a regional thing in England?

It happened in America, it is referred to worldwide as 9/11. It was not our tragedy, it was there’s, we refer to it how they choose. There is no need to refer to it as 11/9 other then snobbery and thinking you’re better than everyone else

fucking call it September 11th if you must

PicaK · 11/09/2022 12:51

Goady just Goady. My 7 year old says diapers which grates a bit. But English is a language that constantly evolves. Go read Bill Bryson's book about it.

Sunnyqueen · 11/09/2022 12:51

Don't Americans call it 9/11? Contrary to how they usually say dates don't think I've ever heard 11/9 and I've watched a few American documentarys on it.

mamabear715 · 11/09/2022 12:53

9/11 happened in America. We can't change that to suit ourselves.
The other stuff.. well, it's up to kids what they call their mother. I called mine Mus as I was growing up! :-)
Math / maths doesn't bother me.. teens etc watch U.S. tv, it creeps in to our language & disappears again when they get bored with it.

The one that bugs me is 'unexplainable' - nothing to do with the States, as far as I'm aware, but each time I hear it on TV I bawl INEXPLICABLE! Same as 'two times' - I shout TWICE!! Grinds my gears! ;-)

vodkaredbullgirl · 11/09/2022 12:53

It's always been called that and always will be.

Luredbyapomegranate · 11/09/2022 12:54

Don’t be a dick - it’s a US event

HorribleHerstory · 11/09/2022 12:55

7/7 must drive you batty OP. What a wasted opportunity to make a point there. If only they’d bombed London one day earlier or later we could have made our day/month point and stuck it to the US.

x2boys · 11/09/2022 12:55

LargeDeviation · 11/09/2022 12:45

The growing Americanisation of our language seems to have accelerated massively over the last few years. I see 'mom' scrawled with abandon all over Mumsnet. Schoolchildren regularly refer to 'math'.

Yes, what happened on Sept 11 2001 was utterly tragic, and I am not seeking to cause anyone pain, but for some reason the totally illogical American date format really annoys me, even more than seeing a fine word lose its 'u'. Month/Day/Year - how can that possibly make any type of sense????

It's now long enough ago that when I talk about it to others, it causes them to stop for a moment and think - and thinking consciously about the loss of British English is maybe the first step to preserving it.

That's how America writes the date ,it being the country in which it happened, you can call it what you want ,but I think people will probably think you are being facetious
Many people in the Midlands call their mothers Mom.

sidewayswalking · 11/09/2022 12:56

YABU.

WhatTheFlap · 11/09/2022 12:57

mamabear715 · 11/09/2022 12:53

9/11 happened in America. We can't change that to suit ourselves.
The other stuff.. well, it's up to kids what they call their mother. I called mine Mus as I was growing up! :-)
Math / maths doesn't bother me.. teens etc watch U.S. tv, it creeps in to our language & disappears again when they get bored with it.

The one that bugs me is 'unexplainable' - nothing to do with the States, as far as I'm aware, but each time I hear it on TV I bawl INEXPLICABLE! Same as 'two times' - I shout TWICE!! Grinds my gears! ;-)

Ooh interesting, I thought these were two completely different words! Although with the same meaning 🧐

dudsville · 11/09/2022 12:58

There's a long standing trend toward saying something you dislike is American. It's not new, not clever.

They write dates differently. The event this refers to happened to them. Stand down.

IncompleteSenten · 11/09/2022 12:58

Use whatever dmy format you like day to day but '9/11' is not what you should use to make a point about whether day or month should come first.
A lot of people died. It happened in America. It is referred to using the American system and it's really tacky to use it to wang on about Americanisation.

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