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AIBU?

to refer to 11/9 rather than 9/11

136 replies

LargeDeviation · 11/09/2022 12:45

The growing Americanisation of our language seems to have accelerated massively over the last few years. I see 'mom' scrawled with abandon all over Mumsnet. Schoolchildren regularly refer to 'math'.

Yes, what happened on Sept 11 2001 was utterly tragic, and I am not seeking to cause anyone pain, but for some reason the totally illogical American date format really annoys me, even more than seeing a fine word lose its 'u'. Month/Day/Year - how can that possibly make any type of sense????

It's now long enough ago that when I talk about it to others, it causes them to stop for a moment and think - and thinking consciously about the loss of British English is maybe the first step to preserving it.

OP posts:
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Am I being unreasonable?

581 votes. Final results.

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You are being unreasonable
94%
You are NOT being unreasonable
6%
Needmorelego · 11/09/2022 12:58

I believe it became known as "9/11" because of thats the way Americans would write the date and because '911' is their emergency services telephone number so the name kind of stuck.

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Pixiedust1234 · 11/09/2022 13:01

It happened in America, it was a horrendous and massive thing to happen so ts their right to say how its named. Are you another one who insists Ukraine should be called The Ukraine etc? Its the same imo

Mom on mn etc - this is a site for ppl who come from all over the world. Even if based in the UK it doesn't mean their language will be the same.

Math from schoolchildren...the ones who are too lazy to talk except with grunts but you expect them to write/type another letter??!

Ye gods you are so unreasonable its not possible for this to be true, surely?

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Florenz · 11/09/2022 13:02

The American date format makes no sense, it's like writing numbers in the format 231 to mean three hundred and twenty one. It should go in order, largest first, or even smallest first would make more sense than month/day/year

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saraclara · 11/09/2022 13:02

It was the Americans' tragedy, so its natural to use their terminology. I think its actually disrespectful to try to change it to suit British English. It's not about us.

Mom is standard in the West Midlands, just as Mam is in much of Yorkshire. Nothing to do with Americanisation at all.

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MarshaBradyo · 11/09/2022 13:03

It happened in US so yabu

They get to use their date

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SmellsLikeMiddleAgeSpirit · 11/09/2022 13:06

Needmorelego · 11/09/2022 12:58

I believe it became known as "9/11" because of thats the way Americans would write the date and because '911' is their emergency services telephone number so the name kind of stuck.

I was also going to add this about the emergency number, which gives the date - in its American format - added significance. I always presumed that this is why they chose that date for their horrific act.

And yes, being a dick about the name of an atrocity doesn't make you look clever at all; quite the opposite.

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Caramac555 · 11/09/2022 13:06

Pedantic.

If you need to de-Americanise something chose something with less potential to offend.

It was an American catastrophe not an British one, its not up to us to rename it.

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Sweetmotherofallthatisholyabov · 11/09/2022 13:07

Yabu. In other news I'm about to become a mom on 11/9 and can't decide whether I should have a Halloween themed baby shower, or a Santa themed sip and see. It's so hard to know, maybe if someone could do the math and help me figure out if 4th babies are early (I've had babies late two times)

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Thatswhyimacat · 11/09/2022 13:07

You know that, studies have shown language pedantry to be a sign of low intelligence. Just saying.

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WhiteFire · 11/09/2022 13:09

I rarely scrawl Mom with abandonment, however I use it every day. I am a Mom in a sea of Mam's. I just write Mum but say Mom.

None of my DC's teachers have ever questioned it.

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SmellsLikeMiddleAgeSpirit · 11/09/2022 13:09

@Sweetmotherofallthatisholyabov
I'm disappointed that you're not having a gender reveal party 😉

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Reallybadidea · 11/09/2022 13:10

Why is "Americanisation" of our language such a terrible thing? Language evolves and adapts.

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SimonAndGarthsUncle · 11/09/2022 13:10

You can say that if you like but everyone will think you’re a mental

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PhillySub · 11/09/2022 13:10

We gave our language to America in the 17th century and that was how we would have written the date back then. You don't own the language, get over it.

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VelvetDancer · 11/09/2022 13:11

Fuck.

I didn't realise that we had to run it last you want we called our own mothers. I feel so embarrassed.

If you could let me know what is OK with you and I'll crack on with informing the millions of people in the UK who don't call their Mams what you approve of.

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FourTeaFallOut · 11/09/2022 13:11

How old are you, op? I suppose we have an emerging generation of adults who were so young on that date that it may seem like some abstract historical date and relates to the even in a different way as someone whose stomach churned as they watched the horror unfold, the dread of not knowing of what was next and then the immediate cascade of political consequences.

Yes, it trivialises it when you use it as an example to claim some kind of superiority.

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TooMuchToDoTooLittleInclination · 11/09/2022 13:11

Florenz · 11/09/2022 13:02

The American date format makes no sense, it's like writing numbers in the format 231 to mean three hundred and twenty one. It should go in order, largest first, or even smallest first would make more sense than month/day/year

It does make sense. 9/11 September the 11th.

11th of September
September the 11th

both equally valid.

@LargeDeviation

you don't sound snobby, just stupid & lacking in knowledge about how things are even in your own country. Disrespectful & rude as well.

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DirectionToPerfection · 11/09/2022 13:12

You have quite the superiority complex OP.

It was America's tragedy and they can call it what they like.

You're being utterly ridiculous and disrespectful. If you uttered this to anyone in person they would think you're a stuck up idiot.

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ShaunaTheSheep · 11/09/2022 13:14
Biscuit
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mina14325 · 11/09/2022 13:15

agree with everyone other than op.
but want to add I say Math because I have a lisp and why would I embarrass myself, or make things more difficult for myself, when semantically it’s exactly the same.
get over yourself.

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itsgettingweird · 11/09/2022 13:15

TeenDivided · 11/09/2022 12:47

  1. 9/11 is what it is called in the USA, where it happened, so it is not unreasonable to call it that.
  2. Mom is a regional thing in some parts of the uK
  3. I am with you on 'math'. Urgh!

This!!!

We call 7/7 just that.

But if it was the 6th or 8th it would have been 6/7 or 8/7 because it happened in the U.K.

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DontKeepTheFaith · 11/09/2022 13:16

YABU, it’s a US tragedy and has always been 9/11, in line with their calendar.

Mom is regional, my mum uses it as a born and bred Brummie. It’s not Americanization, it’s just a quirk of regional dialect.

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Sweetmotherofallthatisholyabov · 11/09/2022 13:16

@SmellsLikeMiddleAgeSpirit I did that at the jubilee - obvs not ideal because everyone knows pink is for girls not red, but after searching and searching I found somewhere that did pink/blue union jacks. But I think I might be barking up some other mumsnet tropes with that one 😂

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MessyBunPersonified · 11/09/2022 13:26

I cant believe that you've noticed it's the anniversary of a tragic event that killed thousands, and then, rather than ignore it or go out of your way to say something respectful, you come online and use it to make a stupid point about grammar.

I bet when you say this to people irl they don't really sit and think that you have a point they think you're an arsehole with a superiority complex.

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Boxowine · 11/09/2022 13:26

PhillySub · 11/09/2022 13:10

We gave our language to America in the 17th century and that was how we would have written the date back then. You don't own the language, get over it.

This is correct. Many "Americanisms" are actually the way things were done and said when the colonists came to the US and never evolved alongside their British counterparts. Studies have been done on American accents and the consensus is that the Southern accent preserves the cadences and intonations of 17th and 18th century English upper class speakers.

9/11 is used in a lot of print media because it is associated with our 911 emergency phone system so that arrangement has a strong visual punch but most people say September 11 when referring to the attacks.

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