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AIBU?

to refer to 11/9 rather than 9/11

136 replies

LargeDeviation · 11/09/2022 12:45

The growing Americanisation of our language seems to have accelerated massively over the last few years. I see 'mom' scrawled with abandon all over Mumsnet. Schoolchildren regularly refer to 'math'.

Yes, what happened on Sept 11 2001 was utterly tragic, and I am not seeking to cause anyone pain, but for some reason the totally illogical American date format really annoys me, even more than seeing a fine word lose its 'u'. Month/Day/Year - how can that possibly make any type of sense????

It's now long enough ago that when I talk about it to others, it causes them to stop for a moment and think - and thinking consciously about the loss of British English is maybe the first step to preserving it.

OP posts:
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Am I being unreasonable?

581 votes. Final results.

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You are NOT being unreasonable
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SleeplessInEngland · 12/09/2022 09:24

The cowardly OP seems to have fucked off but I think calling it 9/11 is fair. It's now effectively the event's name rather than the date on which it happened.

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MaryShelley1818 · 12/09/2022 09:26

You sound staggeringly ignorant.
And I say that as someone who loves the English language and has an English Degree.

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Tangled123 · 12/09/2022 09:32

The Americanism that bothers me the most is ‘I could care less.’ That makes no sense, should be ‘couldn’t care less’ because you’re saying you already care the least amount possible.

9/11 is their name for it, so that’s what it’s called, IMO.

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BigFatLiar · 12/09/2022 09:38

9/11 is fine as its now effectively the name of the event rather than a date as has already been said.

People using american date format on a largely UK site can be a bit confusing but there are Americans who come on so we just have to go with the flow.

What some see in many American terms is often a throwback to the original form of English (or an earlier version).

(I don't mind the term Mom)

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UndertheCedartree · 12/09/2022 09:45

'9/11' is the recognized name of the tragedy. It happened in America so they choose what it is called. It is nothing to do with the 'americanisation' of English in England.

'Mom' is a regional variation, not Americanisation.

But 'Math' - yep, my DD says it and I tell her it's Maths - Mathematics is plural!

Oh and just to blow your mind 'Santa' is also not an americanisation - it is a regional variation in the North/Scotland/N Ireland

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PurpleParrotfish · 12/09/2022 09:50

OP is obviously BVU.

Has anyone else noticed the switch from Brits saying First World War and Second World War towards what I think were originally the US terms World War I and World War II? Which I do find (mildly!) annoying, not sure why, I think it sounds less dignified and more like a film series. And yes, I have bigger things to worry about!

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Dogscanteatonions · 12/09/2022 10:05

economicervix · 12/09/2022 09:22

OP is making mugs of you all, s/he starts bullshit threads to try to rile people.

Have you reported in that case?

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UndertheCedartree · 12/09/2022 10:06

Tangled123 · 12/09/2022 09:32

The Americanism that bothers me the most is ‘I could care less.’ That makes no sense, should be ‘couldn’t care less’ because you’re saying you already care the least amount possible.

9/11 is their name for it, so that’s what it’s called, IMO.

I have read that 'I could care less' is short for 'I could care less but not much.'

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zingally · 12/09/2022 10:10

I'd love to have your life if this is a real issue for you.

Being serious though, it's an event that happened in America, which mostly affected Americans. I personally think it's correct to refer to it as they wish it to be referred to.
The murders of 3000+ innocent civilians isn't really the time or place to be harping on about Americanisms encroaching on British-English.

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onlythreenow · 12/09/2022 20:43

Has anyone else noticed the switch from Brits saying First World War and Second World War towards what I think were originally the US terms World War I and World War II? Which I do find (mildly!) annoying, not sure why, I think it sounds less dignified and more like a film series. And yes, I have bigger things to worry about!

I'm not in the UK or the US but WW1 & WW2 are generally the terms used here. What irritates me more are the people who seem to think that Britain "won the war" singlehandedly.

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Q2C4 · 12/09/2022 21:04

Thatswhyimacat · 11/09/2022 13:07

You know that, studies have shown language pedantry to be a sign of low intelligence. Just saying.

So by that logic, saying 2+2= 5 is a sign of high intelligence?

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