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AIBU?

to refer to 11/9 rather than 9/11

136 replies

LargeDeviation · 11/09/2022 12:45

The growing Americanisation of our language seems to have accelerated massively over the last few years. I see 'mom' scrawled with abandon all over Mumsnet. Schoolchildren regularly refer to 'math'.

Yes, what happened on Sept 11 2001 was utterly tragic, and I am not seeking to cause anyone pain, but for some reason the totally illogical American date format really annoys me, even more than seeing a fine word lose its 'u'. Month/Day/Year - how can that possibly make any type of sense????

It's now long enough ago that when I talk about it to others, it causes them to stop for a moment and think - and thinking consciously about the loss of British English is maybe the first step to preserving it.

OP posts:
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Am I being unreasonable?

581 votes. Final results.

POLL
You are being unreasonable
94%
You are NOT being unreasonable
6%
GreyGreyGreyEverywhere · 11/09/2022 15:41

Your racism is showing OP. As is your pedantic pompousity.

For Irish people the word mamaí (pronounced mommy) directly translates as mammy.

Shame on you posting this on today of all days.

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BlueThingie · 11/09/2022 15:45

9/11 the name of the event, based on what they call it in the US where it happened. When people say it, it’s generally a reference to the attack, not just a reference to a date. YABU. I think making a point of saying 11/9 is pompous and crass in the extreme.

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SofiaSoFar · 11/09/2022 15:45

many people up north use this instead of mum

I've honestly never seen that. I'm a northerner and only over see and hear 'mum' or the occasional 'mam' in some areas.

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edwinbear · 11/09/2022 15:47

The Americans can use whatever date format they wish to refer to such a huge tragedy.

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Sparklingbrook · 11/09/2022 15:55

I grew up in the Birmingham suburbs and people used 'Mom' all the time.

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SmudgeButt · 11/09/2022 15:56

elp30 · 11/09/2022 14:56

@SmudgeButt

Also, referring to Americans as "very noisy and entitled" is very rude.

Sorry but when I was thinking "Americans" I was envisioning Mr Orange Trump. Obviously some people from the USA are delightful. Same as some Brits and many others around the world.

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lailamaria · 11/09/2022 16:47

it was an american tragedy, go be pompous over something else

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Crumblierthanfeta · 11/09/2022 16:55

ForTheLoveOfSleep · 11/09/2022 12:48

For gad sake just say September 11th if it's that much of an issue for you

This

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Winceybincey · 11/09/2022 17:13

Birmingham and other parts of the midlands have always used ‘mom’, it has nothing to do with America.

9/11 is Americas tragedy, so that’s the term for it. What’s the point in having two terms for?

you are being unreasonable, straighten your knickers out, there’s no need to feel so much emotion over terms other people use.

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MajorCarolDanvers · 11/09/2022 17:17

Mom is a British word.

9/11 is the name that American's have given to the one of the most awful events in their history. Its quite acceptable for Brits to use the name for this name for describing this American tradegy.

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Sirius3030 · 11/09/2022 17:37

911 is an emergency call number in the US, just like our 999. So when the disaster happened on 11th September, 9-11 became a very natural name for it.

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economicervix · 11/09/2022 18:08

OP has multiple thread he/she has started, all absolute drivel trying desperately to rile people up 😄

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alfagirl73 · 11/09/2022 18:25

It was a tragedy that happened in the United States - they can call it whatever they want. I would've thought the thousands of people who lost their lives that day was a more important consideration than the format in which they express the date on which it happened.

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PAFMO · 11/09/2022 18:29

economicervix · 11/09/2022 18:08

OP has multiple thread he/she has started, all absolute drivel trying desperately to rile people up 😄

My favourite is the one where she starts a thread slagging Rishi Sunak off for making a grammar mistake. Problem was, he didn't. The OP did. In her thread title. Goady Idiot.

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IHopeYouStepOnALegPiece · 11/09/2022 20:30

PAFMO · 11/09/2022 18:29

My favourite is the one where she starts a thread slagging Rishi Sunak off for making a grammar mistake. Problem was, he didn't. The OP did. In her thread title. Goady Idiot.

😂😂

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jcyclops · 11/09/2022 21:05

I have no problem with calling the tragedy 9/11, even though I would never use 9/11 to describe today's date.

There is a massive problem with what to call things in other countries, or things with foreign names in your own country (eg London Blitz). I think it's polite to try and use the same name as the locals, but as long as everyone understands, it's not something to worry deeply about, except perhaps for Derry/Londonderry.

Orleans - the city on the Loire is OR-LEE-ON, the city in Louisiana is NOO OR-LINS, but if somebody says OR-LEENS then I wouldn't worry.
ʒAN DARK and JOAN OF ARC are both fine with me ( ʒ is as in the middle of "pleasure")
TORINO and TURIN are both fine, but I'm not sure that I believe Rhod Gilbert when he says Abertawe in English is Shithole.

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nachoavocado · 11/09/2022 21:13

Their tragedy they get to call it whatever they like have some respect.

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Brefugee · 12/09/2022 07:18

have only read the 1st page but this stands out:

The one that bugs me is 'unexplainable'

For me it's "obbligated" the word is Obliged. Thank you.

for the rest I'll go with the majority: mom is not an issue, don't like "math" but i don't really care, and say 11th September if it bugs you so much.

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SmellsLikeMiddleAgeSpirit · 12/09/2022 08:12

For me it's "obbligated" the word is Obliged. Thank you.

'Obligated' and 'obliged' are both words, with slightly different meanings.

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Brefugee · 12/09/2022 08:24

but people are saying and writing obligated when they mean obliged, I'm aware of the difference, thanks.

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Sugerfree · 12/09/2022 08:28

LargeDeviation · 11/09/2022 12:45

The growing Americanisation of our language seems to have accelerated massively over the last few years. I see 'mom' scrawled with abandon all over Mumsnet. Schoolchildren regularly refer to 'math'.

Yes, what happened on Sept 11 2001 was utterly tragic, and I am not seeking to cause anyone pain, but for some reason the totally illogical American date format really annoys me, even more than seeing a fine word lose its 'u'. Month/Day/Year - how can that possibly make any type of sense????

It's now long enough ago that when I talk about it to others, it causes them to stop for a moment and think - and thinking consciously about the loss of British English is maybe the first step to preserving it.

I feel your pain about creeping Americanisms in our language. Math is annoying, but no more than the current ubiquitous use of "call" - as in: "It's your call".

However, 9/11, though it affected the entire planet, did take place in America and month before day is their way of doing things. However perverse putting the ten before the unit feels, it is, er, their "call". I agree it ought not to be ours.

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Shortpoet · 12/09/2022 08:36

Ok, I’ll bite.

Yes, what happened on Sept 11 2001 was utterly tragic,

Don’t you mean, “Yes, what happened on 11th September 2001 was utterly tragic”.

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onlythreenow · 12/09/2022 08:48

You are being ridiculous and pompous. It happened in the USA so we use their terminology. I don't live in the UK and it actually happened on September 12th here, but I don't hear people ranting about it, we still say 9/11.

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Dogscanteatonions · 12/09/2022 08:56

You're fucked up if THIS is what bothers you about 9/11.

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economicervix · 12/09/2022 09:22

OP is making mugs of you all, s/he starts bullshit threads to try to rile people.

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