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AIBU?

To charge my sibling rent?

203 replies

Inheritanceconfusion · 08/10/2022 21:01

My sibling and I inherited a property from our parents, when they died.


My sibling has been living there for about 18 months since probate was granted. The intention was to buy my share but that has been delayed for various reasons.


My sibling has not been paying anything for living there and I’ve recently discovered that they and their spouse are saving around £2k per month.


With costs of living and our own mortgage rising, I am considering asking them to pay me some rent on the property.


Would that be unreasonable? I think they would think so.

OP posts:

Am I being unreasonable?

655 votes. Final results.

POLL
You are being unreasonable
20%
You are NOT being unreasonable
80%
coffeeandpoetry · 08/10/2022 21:03

Come off it 😂

Inheritanceconfusion · 08/10/2022 21:04

What??

OP posts:
Testng123 · 08/10/2022 21:05

Can you go and live with them, in your "half"? Or rent out your half? Theoretically?

minou123 · 08/10/2022 21:05

Disclaimer: I don't gave legal knowledge.

But based on the fact you both own the property, I dont think you can charge her rent.

I think you either push the issue of her buying you out, or if she is unable to do that then you sell the house and split the sale price.

OnTheRunWithMannyMontana · 08/10/2022 21:05

I'm not sure about rent but I think there really does need to be some discussion about finances. I've never been in that position so I can't offer any practical advice but just wanted to say I would be pissed off by this too.

incognitopurple · 08/10/2022 21:06

Think it is a little petty to be honest. If you’re lucky enough to have your own house in addition to this, great for them if they can save and better their life. It would seem formal and uncomfortable to ask for rent I think.

Anunusualfamily · 08/10/2022 21:08

I think this is the situation that I will end up in with me being your sibling in this situation. We have discussed it and we agreed to pay half of (just below) market rate as it’s an expensive area. Any maintenance etc is shared 50:50

SarahAndQuack · 08/10/2022 21:10

I have no idea about the legalities. I can see why, if your sibling was renting, moving into an empty house made total sense financially and practically. But it also seems pretty obvious that they ought to offer you a bit of the value as it's a jointly-owned property. I can't see myself bringing it up with a sibling who was absolutely skint, but otherwise, I would think they really should.

missmamiecuddleduck · 08/10/2022 21:10

You already have a house plus half of this one.

I take it they didn't own anything before the inheritance?

Is she saving to buy out your shae?

PauliesWalnuts · 08/10/2022 21:10

I’ve been in this position. My sibling and I inherited a house when parents died and by the time probate was granted the housing market crashed and we couldn’t sell for love nor money. There was no mortgage but I did have to save to buy them out as a mortgage on my salary was too high. I offered to pay them rent on their half of the house and cover the council tax, which they accepted. They had a new baby and it wasn’t fair for me to benefit from free housing for a couple of years and they not. I did it gladly.

yougotthelook · 08/10/2022 21:11

Inheritanceconfusion · 08/10/2022 21:01

My sibling and I inherited a property from our parents, when they died.


My sibling has been living there for about 18 months since probate was granted. The intention was to buy my share but that has been delayed for various reasons.


My sibling has not been paying anything for living there and I’ve recently discovered that they and their spouse are saving around £2k per month.


With costs of living and our own mortgage rising, I am considering asking them to pay me some rent on the property.


Would that be unreasonable? I think they would think so.

Why would they pay you rent when you own the property jointly?
Equally it does sound unfair that they are living rent free...have you discussed how long this is going to go on for?
I'd say you need to discuss selling the property, sibling actually buying your half, or sibling moving out do it can be rented to someone else.
It's a joint asset so it's absolutely not fair to you what's happening with it, but sibling paying you rent is not the way to go xx

StopFeckingFaffing · 08/10/2022 21:11

You can't charge someone rent for a property they own

Cats23 · 08/10/2022 21:11

If she can't buy you out- Sell it and split it any money.

coffeeandpoetry · 08/10/2022 21:11

Inheritanceconfusion · 08/10/2022 21:04

What??

Legally, no.

And I can see why your sibling would think it's unreasonable, lets put it that way.

Cameleongirl · 08/10/2022 21:12

What’s the longterm plan for the property? If they want to stay there for years then you do need a formal agreement on maintaining the property, who’s paying the bills, and possibly charging them some rent.

If you’re planning to sell it soon, I wouldn’t bother.

JudgeJ · 08/10/2022 21:13

incognitopurple · 08/10/2022 21:06

Think it is a little petty to be honest. If you’re lucky enough to have your own house in addition to this, great for them if they can save and better their life. It would seem formal and uncomfortable to ask for rent I think.

'lucky enough to have your own house'
My mother always said 'the hard I work, the luckier I get!'
All those who think that the free-loader should continue to have a free ride at the OP's expense are wanting the OP to subsidise the sister's lazy life. The house should be sold and profits split or the sister pays 50% of the market value to stay there. In the meantime it's immoral that she's living there for nothing.

JudgeJ · 08/10/2022 21:14

StopFeckingFaffing · 08/10/2022 21:11

You can't charge someone rent for a property they own

They only own 50% and should pay 50% of the market rate rent.

Inheritanceconfusion · 08/10/2022 21:15

Us owning a home already is down to life choices. I’m not being petty when I say that. The option would have been available to my sibling earlier in life.

OP posts:
Cameleongirl · 08/10/2022 21:15

Or she can buy you out and fully own the property, as PP’s have said.

Inheritanceconfusion · 08/10/2022 21:17

That is the intention @Cameleongirl but it’s taking a long time with no sign of it speeding up.

OP posts:
Ship · 08/10/2022 21:17

JudgeJ · 08/10/2022 21:13

'lucky enough to have your own house'
My mother always said 'the hard I work, the luckier I get!'
All those who think that the free-loader should continue to have a free ride at the OP's expense are wanting the OP to subsidise the sister's lazy life. The house should be sold and profits split or the sister pays 50% of the market value to stay there. In the meantime it's immoral that she's living there for nothing.

This! And I love your mothers quote

MacarenaMacarena · 08/10/2022 21:18

JudgeJ · 08/10/2022 21:13

'lucky enough to have your own house'
My mother always said 'the hard I work, the luckier I get!'
All those who think that the free-loader should continue to have a free ride at the OP's expense are wanting the OP to subsidise the sister's lazy life. The house should be sold and profits split or the sister pays 50% of the market value to stay there. In the meantime it's immoral that she's living there for nothing.

This.

CandyLeBonBon · 08/10/2022 21:19

If you want a shared ownership agreement you'll have to go through the correct legal channels to make that happen op.

You might feel it's unfair, but you'll have to spend money to get that legally enforced.

Good luck. You'll need it!

Anunusualfamily · 08/10/2022 21:19

I don’t think it’s unreasonable at all. The OP could push for the house to be sold now before the sibling is able to buy them out. This way the sibling can continue to save to buy equity and apply for mortgage and pay rent on the half they don’t own so that the OP is receiving the benefit of their inheritance

rookiemere · 08/10/2022 21:20

My friend has been in this situation and it dragged on for a long time and caused a lot of resentment.

I'd be careful with charging rent in case they start holding you liable for any repairs.

Can you get it valued? Any reason why they couldn't get a mortgage for their half and buy you out ?

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