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AIBU?

To charge my sibling rent?

203 replies

Inheritanceconfusion · 08/10/2022 21:01

My sibling and I inherited a property from our parents, when they died.


My sibling has been living there for about 18 months since probate was granted. The intention was to buy my share but that has been delayed for various reasons.


My sibling has not been paying anything for living there and I’ve recently discovered that they and their spouse are saving around £2k per month.


With costs of living and our own mortgage rising, I am considering asking them to pay me some rent on the property.


Would that be unreasonable? I think they would think so.

OP posts:
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Am I being unreasonable?

655 votes. Final results.

POLL
You are being unreasonable
20%
You are NOT being unreasonable
80%
Inheritanceconfusion · 10/10/2022 08:19

My post of 07.34 was supposed to say ‘raiding their savings’, not raising. Freudian slip!

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femfemlicious · 10/10/2022 08:25

Realityloom · 09/10/2022 03:48

True but it makes you greedy also. You have a house and some where to live. How can you want to charge your own sister rent?

Do you both get along?

How is she greedy.she simply wants her inheritance that was left to her!

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Inheritanceconfusion · 10/10/2022 08:33

We honestly do get on well. We relationship is really important to me and that’s why I’ve let it go on for so long.

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Charley50 · 10/10/2022 09:00

Look, you were left 50/50 shares in an estate and that's what you should get. Emotion needs to be taken out at this stage. It's not a negotiation.

You need to look out for yourself and your husband and children now. As you get on well with your sibling just be factual that you did not anticipate the properties taking this long to sell and that you would like her now to start paying market rent so you can both benefit from your inheritance. And maybe the property should be sold if your other one won't sell?

(And no shouldn't pay utility bills, just buildings insurance. Person who lives there pays bills, just like renters do! Repairs is a more a grey area at this stage).

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RincewindsHat · 10/10/2022 09:03

Of course you should, you own half the house and they're living in the whole thing for free and not buying you out for whatever reason. Not unreasonable at all.

How on earth do all the people saying "you can't charge rent for a house you own" think shared ownership WORKS? It works because you pay rent on the half you do not own. This is shared ownership, if you need to sell or rent your half, do what you need to do - you are not obliged to subsidise your sister's choices here.

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HeckyPeck · 10/10/2022 19:29

Inheritanceconfusion · 10/10/2022 07:34

@MRex That would have been an option - I didn’t want it at the time because I didn’t want sole responsibility for a property I was unsure would sell. I thought it was neater to just divide everything by 50%. But it is taking a long time.

For PPs suggesting sort of back dating rent, I don’t think I would do that because it would not have been spelled out up front and would seem like I was raising their savings, which are geared at buying me out. So it would be counter productive as well.

I would y backdate either, but 100% charge rent from now on.

Otherwise you're just buying yourself out!

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HeckyPeck · 10/10/2022 19:29

*wouldn't

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Inheritanceconfusion · 10/10/2022 21:45

Oh my God, @HeckyPeck. Buying myself out.

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Mamai90 · 11/10/2022 01:00

YellowTreeHouse · 08/10/2022 21:31

YABVU. It is their property too, so no you can’t charge them rent.

And also, why would you want to? Why would you be so petty and bitter?

This.

Never in a million years would I do this. My parents worked hard and had well paid professional jobs, my dad was one of eight and often helped his siblings out taking them on holiday, giving them a few quid here and there etc. His siblings worked hard too, they just didn't have as much money. That's just how my family are. We love eachother, we help eachother, we don't keep score. Anyway, my relationship with my sister is more important than money to me.

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Valeriekat · 11/10/2022 03:01

missmamiecuddleduck · 08/10/2022 21:10

You already have a house plus half of this one.

I take it they didn't own anything before the inheritance?

Is she saving to buy out your shae?

No, she has a mortgage which need paying. You must see a lawyer asap.

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thisisthestoryabout · 11/10/2022 03:29

What people need to remember is that you would be getting an income if you rented it out to someone else, so you are losing out by renting to your sibling.

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ChampagneCamping · 11/10/2022 04:32

I’d talk to your sister about renting the property out to someone else so that you noth have an income from it

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deeperthanallroses · 11/10/2022 05:04

Unreasonable to charge rent, but perfectly reasonable to say I get why you wanted to liquidate the other place first but it’s taking a while and we have plans on hold, so we need to do the buy it out and then you can pay down your mortgage when the other place sells, ive made an appt with my solicitors to get the forms and will send them to you.

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whowhatwerewhy · 11/10/2022 08:36

@HeckyPeck has a very valid point you are buying yourself out .
I can see your intentions were to help your sister short term , probably thinking the other house would sell , she could then buy you out .
But it's now gone on 18 months, she's saving your not .
A frank conversation is needed that your now asset Rich but cash poor . You now need your equity or an income from the property.
Can the other house go to auction?

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Yesnoormaybe · 11/10/2022 08:57

The value of the house at probate is how you split the proceeds 50 50. When your sister is ready to buy you out, have the house valued and your share is 50% of the new valuation plus the difference between probate price and updated price. This way you are not losing out financially

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Hereward1332 · 11/10/2022 09:41

If your sibling doesn't want to pay half rent on the whole property, suggest to her you rent out your half as a house share.

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ReadingFestival2022 · 11/10/2022 10:20

YellowTreeHouse · 08/10/2022 21:31

YABVU. It is their property too, so no you can’t charge them rent.

And also, why would you want to? Why would you be so petty and bitter?

But they absolutely can. They own 50% each. Legally they can be charged 50% of the market rental rate.

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BirdinaHedge · 11/10/2022 11:05

Unreasonable to charge rent, but perfectly reasonable to say I get why you wanted to liquidate the other place first but it’s taking a while and we have plans on hold, so we need to do the buy it out and then you can pay down your mortgage when the other place sells, ive made an appt with my solicitors to get the forms and will send them to you.

I think that @Inheritanceconfusion needs to take legal advice about forcing a sale, when she owns 50% but the other owner is not prepared to do anything.

And in the interim, it's clear that the situation is now very unfair, as it's gone on for 18 months.It's now NOT unreasonable to charge the sibling 50% of the market rate of rent.

The resident sibling is gaining financially from the arrangement; @Inheritanceconfusion is not. She should be entitled to a payment of 50% of the market rate rent from her sibling. This could be done NOW, or as part of an adjustment in being bought out.

But the sibling living in the house is now taking the mick.

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Inheritanceconfusion · 11/10/2022 12:00

@Hereward1332 My sibling’s family lives there. There’s no room for anyone else.

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SteakExpectations · 11/10/2022 16:23

I think that while you know the liquidation of the other asset is in hand to allow for your sibling to buy you out, you shouldn’t also ask for rent, but I would want to make sure that when you are bought out, that it’s at today’s value and not as at 18months ago when the deal was struck.

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LindseyHoyleSpeaks · 11/10/2022 16:27

Your sibling is well and truly scamming you and you’re worried about being seen as the bad guy??!! Have some self respect! They clearly don’t care a jot about your feelings as they profit off you every single month. Seriously, give your head a massive wobble and force a sale. Ensure that you’re compensated adequately and fairly for the amount they owe you.

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OpenHeartCloseEyes · 11/10/2022 16:41

I'm in a similar situation. My sibling lives in our late parents' house which we now own jointly. There is not a hope in the world that my sibling will ever be able to afford to buy me out. I would like to sell the house but sibling quite likes having a free place to live. I am on the hook for property taxes and other expenses but I get no benefit from technically being an owner. Where I live (not the U.K.) it would be perfectly legal for me to charge rent but I just don't feel that I can do that. It's an awful situation and I don't see a way out. Unfortunately, it has caused our relationship as siblings to deteriorate. We used to be close but not anymore.

I hope you have a better outcome than me @Inheritanceconfusion

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mrswibblywobbly · 11/10/2022 16:52

Your sibling should be paying half the market share of the rent.

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kingtamponthefurred · 11/10/2022 17:22

The other property is a red herring-if it is not selling, your sister needs to find an alternative strategy for raising the money to buy you out, or accept that it's not going to happen and the house will be sold to someone else. Both of you will then get a useful sum of money and she can use hers to put down a deposit on a place of her own. The power to sell overrides the power not to sell. If she does not accept that, it may be worth paying a solicitor to spell it out to her.

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UnderCoverFieldAgent · 11/10/2022 17:25

I’m not legally trained but she’s taking the piss. Get onto a solicitor who specialises in this ASAP and see about selling the property as getting rent off her will be a right pain.

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