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To think they should just ban nuts on all flights

(1000 Posts)
Ijustwantaquietlife Mon 21-Aug-17 15:45:01

Just reading this and it's heartbreaking, seems like such a simple change to ban nuts on all flights to help protect people.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-4809148/Former-ITV-producer-reveals-shocking-effect-nut-allergy.html

I've heard several people on mn saying they've been on flights where they were banned, seams to make sense as nut allergies are so widespread to just ban all together imo.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-4809148/Former-ITV-producer-reveals-shocking-effect-nut-allergy.html

Ijustwantaquietlife Mon 21-Aug-17 15:45:12

www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-4809148/Former-ITV-producer-reveals-shocking-effect-nut-allergy.html click now?

Neutrogena Mon 21-Aug-17 15:47:08

No, they shouldn't ban them. I have not read the article as it's in the Daily Heil, but most people seem to Deere nuts on flights.

SindyFishtail Mon 21-Aug-17 15:49:21

Didn't read the article but yanbu. These allergies are airborne too so anyone in enclosed cabin it's a nightmare for sufferers. Surely crisps/breadsticks/pretzels are more than acceptable alternative

Rufustherenegadereindeer1 Mon 21-Aug-17 15:49:28

ijustwant

I think they should be banned

I really fancied some M&Ms when we flew a few weeks ago i was half way through the pack when the announcement came on the plane that there was someone with a severe allergy

I stopped immediately obviously

Dd has a slight allergy but only when she eats one...which she doesn't

Sirzy Mon 21-Aug-17 15:50:22

My sister carries a medical certificate so when she flies the announcement is made that nuts won't be sold and asking people not to eat them - of course the latter relies on people being "kind"

JeReviens Mon 21-Aug-17 15:50:29

I won't be adding to the Daily Hate's click count but anyway - I agree with Neutrogena. I've been on a flight recently where such an announcement was made - no bother. I can go 8 hours without a nut as I'm sure most rational people can.

Antigonads Mon 21-Aug-17 15:52:03

So as well as checking bags for potential bomb making hazards, security will have to check for nuts as well?

I enjoy a small bag of nuts with my G&T when flying.

TheRealBiscuitAddict Mon 21-Aug-17 15:53:18

Ridiculous idea. Haven't read the article, and it is of course tragic for the individual concerned whoever they are, however it is not true to say that nut allergies are so wide spread that nuts ought to be banned. In fact what needs to happen is that there needs to be a greater study conducted into how nut allergies have become such a thing when they previously weren't.

But even the anaphylaxis campaign does not support the banning of nuts or nut products as this leads to an air of complacency. Added to which leads to greater tragic outcomes. And nuts aren't the only product which people have allergies to, what about dairy for instance? It's possible to have a dairy allergy with equally tragic outcomes yet we only don't call for dairy allergies because it would inconvenience people, so the argument for the banning of nuts doesn't actually have anything to do with the wish to protect individuals at all.... if it did there would be similar calls for banning dairy products, gluten etc.

GhostsToMonsoon Mon 21-Aug-17 15:54:15

We flew Easyjet this year and DH packed a peanut butter sandwich. He wasn't allowed to eat it as there was an announcement asking people not to eat nuts as a passenger had a nut allergy. I wouldn't be surprised if nuts on planes go the way of smoking and large containers of liquids. It would be easy for airlines not to serve them, but perhaps harder when people on budget airlines bring their own food.

StillStayingClassySanDiego Mon 21-Aug-17 15:54:29

I started a thread about Amy in Chat , she was on This Morning today. It is heartbreaking to see what happened to her.

Kursk Mon 21-Aug-17 15:55:11

I would be interested to know why allergies such as nuts have become more prevalent over the past few years?

I don't know anyone with allergies

kingfishergreen Mon 21-Aug-17 15:55:52

I enjoy a small bag of nuts with my G&T when flying.

And my cousin enjoys not dying.

Witsender Mon 21-Aug-17 15:56:18

Given the enclosed nature of a plane it would make sense to make it a blanket rule that you don't eat them on a plane. There are plenty of other snacks available.

Vinorosso74 Mon 21-Aug-17 15:56:48

I like nuts but can survive without on a flight so it wouldn't bother me.
We had the announcement on our outbound flight that someone on board had a severe allergy so none would be sold and could passengers not eat any. I mentioned this to a friend who said that would annoy her being told she couldn't eat a food item-not sure why as she's fair from rebellious!

Ijustwantaquietlife Mon 21-Aug-17 15:56:51

Pasting for those that don't want to click (I understand but I don't think one or two clicks less makes much difference)

A high-flying TV producer with a nut allergy was left in a coma, brain damaged and wheelchair bound after eating just one bite of a dish she ordered in a restaurant.

Amy-May Shead, 29, was with friends in Budapest in 2014 when she took just one mouthful of a chicken and rice dish and suffered a near-fatal anaphylactic reaction.

This was despite Amy informing the manager and the chef she had a nut allergy beforehand and was reassured it would be fine.

Two doses of her EpiPen failed to contain the reaction and emergency services were called, but Amy had been starved of oxygen for nearly six minutes and was left in a coma with severe brain damage. Doctors initially told her parents she would not survive.

Now wheelchair bound, Amy appeared on This Morning, the show she was once an online producer for, with her parents Roger and Sue Shead who are now fighting for allergies to be taken more seriously.

Presenters Ruth Langsford and Eamonn Holmes, who once worked closely with Amy vowed to support them. Eamonn added he would like nuts to be banned on flights after a recent story about a young boy who suffered an allergic reaction after several bags were opened near him.

He said: 'As we're on here and we know you, we will be fighting for these nuts to be banned on flights.'

Ruth comforted Amy throughout the interview. She asked Amy, who is unable to speak but can understand what was being said, what she thought of the debate and she communicated by blinking that she agreed there should be a ban in place on nuts on flights.

Severe nut allergy sufferer Amy May Shead appears on This Morning
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Amy-May Shead, centre, with her mother Sue and This Morning presenter Ruth Langsford, who was a former colleague of Amy's+8
Amy-May Shead, centre, with her mother Sue and This Morning presenter Ruth Langsford, who was a former colleague of Amy's
Amy (back row, centre) was an online producer for This Morning before she had a devastating reaction to nuts+8
Amy (back row, centre) was an online producer for This Morning before she had a devastating reaction to nuts
Amy was on holiday in Budapest when she ate just one mouthful of a chicken and rice dish at a restaurant that the chef had assured her was nut-free. She was left in a coma and is now severely brain damaged+8
Amy was on holiday in Budapest when she ate just one mouthful of a chicken and rice dish at a restaurant that the chef had assured her was nut-free. She was left in a coma and is now severely brain damaged
Ruth added: 'You’re so brave for coming on here, we all love to see you and we miss you on here.'

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Amy worked closely with Eamonn and Ruth and was often seen working away in the background on the on-air segments+8
Amy worked closely with Eamonn and Ruth and was often seen working away in the background on the on-air segments
Amy's mother Sue explained that whenever her daughter travelled she would carry a card in the language of the country explaining of her allergy.

Sue said that Amy had told the restaurant that she couldn't have anything with nuts and the chef had also been informed of the allergy, unfortunately just one mouthful of the chicken and rice dish she had selected, led to the catastrophic reaction.

Amy administered two shots of her EpiPen - and epinephrine autoinjector -used in an emergency to treat an anaphylactic reaction.

THE MOMENT AMY'S LIFE CHANGED

14 April 2014: Amy was on holiday in Budapest when she had an anaphylaxis reaction to one bite of food she ate at a restaurant.

Administered her EpiPen twice but then fell unconscious and was starved of oxygen for six minutes before being revived by medics.

Amy spent 19 days in Budapest ICU in a coma before stabilising. She was then flown home and spent 11 months in St Thomas' Hospital, London.

March 2015: She was then transferred to Putney Neurological Hospital and spent 316 days there.

January 2016: She was moved to a specialist care facility unit in Essex.

2017: Amy's parents are set to move into a specially adapted home to continue their care for their daughter.

It failed to counteract the allergy and it took half an hour for the medics to bring her back round.

Amy was placed on life-support when she arrived at the hospital in Budapest and her parents were told she may not survive the week, and was given just a thirty per cent chance of survival.

After she was stabilised she was then flown home and treated in St Thomas' hospital, London.

Since the incident, Amy's parents had to sell their home to fund the costs of the hospital treatment as the insurance didn't cover their daughter's condition. They rely on a trust set up in her name, The Amy-May Foundation.

They are backing a recent call for any nut-based snacks to be banned on any flights after a three-year-old recently suffered a severe allergic aboard a plane.

Singapore Airlines said they would review their policies on nuts in-flight after three-year-old Marcus Daley, who was returning home to Melbourne with his parents, had an anaphylaxis reaction when his fellow passengers were eating nuts.

His parents administered medication and were able to stop the reaction but it sparked a debate regarding how serious allergies are taken.

Allthebestnamesareused Mon 21-Aug-17 15:57:09

Ricky Gervais does a comedy routine about this in his Humanity Tour and it is actually quite amusing.

Surely if you know you have an allergy you'd carry your epi pen/medication.

If you don't know then you'd not be asking people not to eat them anyway.

kingfishergreen Mon 21-Aug-17 15:58:44

I would be interested to know why allergies such as nuts have become more prevalent over the past few years?

There was a rumour that it was due to a particular nipple cream in the 1980's that had peanut oil in which was giving babies exposure to peanut antigens. I don't know how true that is, probably not very.

Kursk Mon 21-Aug-17 15:58:54

Banning nuts would be impossible to do world wide.

TaliZorahVasNormandy Mon 21-Aug-17 15:59:00

YANBU. I have nut allergy and prefer not to have a reaction while in the air.

Ijustwantaquietlife Mon 21-Aug-17 15:59:03

So your happy to risk someone's life because you like a particular snack while drinking? shockangry

Antigonads Mon 21-Aug-17 15:59:09

It is many years since nuts have been served on flights that I've been on hence I occasionaly take my own. If there was an announcement that someone had a nut allergy of course I wouldn't eat them.

JaneEyre70 Mon 21-Aug-17 15:59:25

I was in tears watching that poor girl on This Morning. How utterly horrific for her and her family, and all from eating something when she'd made her allergy clear sad. My grandaughter has got coeliac disease, and watching her writhe with agony if she's been given gluten accidentally is horrifying enough, let alone someone suffering from anaphalyxsis. Trouble is, we're all immune to "intolerances" these days as so many claim to suffer from them, and the genuinely allergic are seen as attention seeking. If someone can't go for a few hours without a nut for the sake of another, it's a sad world.

MrsOllyMurs Mon 21-Aug-17 15:59:49

I think it's quite acceptable the way things are - if anyone does have a severe, airborne nut allergy, the crew should be informed. Announcement is made. Other passengers comply. I don't think it's feasible to be searching every ones hand luggage for nut products. That said, where snacks are given onboard with drinks, I'm sure a suitable alternative could be found.

MongerTruffle Mon 21-Aug-17 15:59:56

Ryanair banned a passenger a few years ago because he ate some nuts on a flight after being told multiple times not to.

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