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AIBU?

Would you prefer to retire to the countryside or city centre?

218 replies

Faciadipasta · 15/10/2022 16:02

Inspired by another thread on here I'm just curious to see people's thoughts. I'm not due to retire for another 20 years or so but really hadn't considered doing so in the centre of London (or maybe another big city) but now after the other thread I'm thinking what a bloody brilliant idea!
I'd always just thought people tend to retire to the seaside or countryside before. So what do others think? City or countryside? And why?

OP posts:
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Am I being unreasonable?

54 votes. Final results.

POLL
You are being unreasonable
31%
You are NOT being unreasonable
69%
SusanSHelit · 16/10/2022 20:46

I've lived in both and it's city all the way for me.

There's only so much grass/mountain /sheep I can look at before I'm bored stiff and I like things like good access to healthcare, mains gas and water, not having to deal with a septic tank, and coffee shops.

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TightDiamondShoes · 17/10/2022 07:02

@Cuppasoupmonster i guess it depends on your village. Where I am we look after each other because we’re decent human beings who look after our neighbours young and old.

we lay on minibuses to gather up the OAPs and take them shopping - and if they’re not up to that, someone will deliver food. Maybe the shop, maybe “Gary” the bus-driver or may be me if I’m heading that way.

sounds to me as though not all remote arse end of nowhere places are created equally.

Social care exists nationwide.

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Cuppasoupmonster · 17/10/2022 10:17

@TightDiamondShoes i think that’s the norm in a lot of villages, my point was more when does it cross the line into a level of care that your neighbours can’t provide, and what happens when it does. While it’s lovely to have services like the ones you mentioned available to, I don’t think you can assume charity will pick up the burden of your elderly care. Times are quite tough at the moment and it might be that Gary no longer has the time to drive round shopping as he’s taken on extra hours at work etc.

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TightDiamondShoes · 17/10/2022 10:39

Then you apply to the council to get a carer come visit - no different to town. The aforementioned minibuses are funded by the council.

maybe people will take in more hours… or maybe they chose remote living because they wanted a different pace of life. City people always seem to be in a hurry.

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etulosba · 17/10/2022 11:55

Then you apply to the council to get a carer come visit - no different to town

Exactly.

Which is why I asked who provided these services in city centres. One of my close neighbours had daily health visits, plus regular help from other neighbours.

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AntsGoMarchingOneByOne · 17/10/2022 11:58

Retiring in the city centre sounds like hell to me.
I'd prefer country-side, but probably not very rural. Or maybe a suburb, or a small town.

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Cuppasoupmonster · 17/10/2022 12:03

TightDiamondShoes · 17/10/2022 10:39

Then you apply to the council to get a carer come visit - no different to town. The aforementioned minibuses are funded by the council.

maybe people will take in more hours… or maybe they chose remote living because they wanted a different pace of life. City people always seem to be in a hurry.

You have a very romantic idea of small villages 😂 they still can’t eat air, if you think the only reason people take on extra jobs is for a bit of extra spending money then you have no idea how skint a lot of people are at the moment.

Im not saying community support doesn’t exist, I’m saying there’s a difference between thinking ‘oh that’s a good scheme if it’s still going I’ll probably need it in future’ then indulgently assuming the village will want to do things for you. Particularly if you’re a relatively new incomer who hasn’t contributed a great deal yourself.

I’m from a small remote village by the way, everyone’s very helpful which is lovely but I wouldn’t assume people will help me before they offer.

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gogohmm · 17/10/2022 12:13

Neither, a town near a city, countryside and the seaside. Already live there (working but older, moved 2 years ago)

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TightDiamondShoes · 17/10/2022 12:58

Like I already said 🙄 - not all villages are created equal. Your experience may well be different to mine. Common sense would dictate that.

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etulosba · 17/10/2022 13:14

You have a very romantic idea of small villages 😂 they still can’t eat air, if you think the only reason people take on extra jobs is for a bit of extra spending money then you have no idea how skint a lot of people are at the moment.

I live in one. I have no need to eat air, nor am I likely to need to take on extra jobs in the future.

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Cuppasoupmonster · 17/10/2022 13:16

etulosba · 17/10/2022 13:14

You have a very romantic idea of small villages 😂 they still can’t eat air, if you think the only reason people take on extra jobs is for a bit of extra spending money then you have no idea how skint a lot of people are at the moment.

I live in one. I have no need to eat air, nor am I likely to need to take on extra jobs in the future.

I was talking about Gary, so you’ve pretty much proved my point really…

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balalake · 17/10/2022 13:17

If I move out of the city after retirement, I will choose somewhere that I can live without a car (do not have one now).

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etulosba · 17/10/2022 13:59

I was talking about Gary, so you’ve pretty much proved my point really…

Have I?

While it’s lovely to have services like the ones you mentioned available to, I don’t think you can assume charity will pick up the burden of your elderly care.

How is living in a town going to make any difference?

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Kite22 · 17/10/2022 14:04

How is living in a town going to make any difference?

Proximity to services.
Then, even if you have no family or friends to take you places, there are buses / trains / trams aplenty. Or, Ring and Ride. Or community minibuses that take you to day care centres or churches. Or, taxis and ubers that are very competitive and affordable, partially because you are only likely to be needing to travel a couple of miles rather than 20, and partially because they are competing against other taxi companies.
That is for social things as well as shopping and as well as appointments like hair cuts and dentist and chiropodist before you get on to more and more frequent hospital appointments.

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Cuppasoupmonster · 17/10/2022 14:16

etulosba · 17/10/2022 13:59

I was talking about Gary, so you’ve pretty much proved my point really…

Have I?

While it’s lovely to have services like the ones you mentioned available to, I don’t think you can assume charity will pick up the burden of your elderly care.

How is living in a town going to make any difference?

Yes, all your posts are about what you expect others to do for you, without a moment’s concern for the volunteers and what would happen if they for whatever reason couldn’t see to your needs. It reads as a bit indulgent if I’m honest. Theres a big difference between appreciating what is offered at the time, and just expecting others will do it when that time comes.

In a town, you can walk places - GP, local shop etc. They’re likely to be far closer and not necessary to drive to if you position yourself sensibly. Living in a rural village, you’ll be relying on charity lifts or taxis (which as we know are a total nightmare in rural locations), people dropping your shopping etc. And don’t get me started on snow days!

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KimberleyClark · 17/10/2022 14:22

Kite22 · 17/10/2022 14:04

How is living in a town going to make any difference?

Proximity to services.
Then, even if you have no family or friends to take you places, there are buses / trains / trams aplenty. Or, Ring and Ride. Or community minibuses that take you to day care centres or churches. Or, taxis and ubers that are very competitive and affordable, partially because you are only likely to be needing to travel a couple of miles rather than 20, and partially because they are competing against other taxi companies.
That is for social things as well as shopping and as well as appointments like hair cuts and dentist and chiropodist before you get on to more and more frequent hospital appointments.

This.

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Cuppasoupmonster · 17/10/2022 14:24

Also most towns have buses directly to the local hospital, which is much cheaper than taxis. From our village the hospital was a 45 minute drive, mainly back roads, and my Nan (who is one of the ‘volunteers’) begrudged people summoning her for lifts and not even offering any petrol money!

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Scrowy · 17/10/2022 19:18

Are people not reading the thread? It's not the same as urban areas because there are hardly any people to do the care and there unlikely to be much movement on that anytime soon because no one on carers wages can afford to move to the area.

you can't get carers for love nor money in my local (rural) area.

the council are operating waiting lists for home care, they are thousands of hours short a week of the care they need for people in the area. If you are outside of the market towns you have absolutely no hope. The hospitals are full of people who can't be discharged because there is no care at home and no space left in residential care within 80 miles. It's not even winter yet!

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