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AIBU?

Would you prefer to retire to the countryside or city centre?

218 replies

Faciadipasta · 15/10/2022 16:02

Inspired by another thread on here I'm just curious to see people's thoughts. I'm not due to retire for another 20 years or so but really hadn't considered doing so in the centre of London (or maybe another big city) but now after the other thread I'm thinking what a bloody brilliant idea!
I'd always just thought people tend to retire to the seaside or countryside before. So what do others think? City or countryside? And why?

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cocktailclub · 16/10/2022 07:04

London would be my ideal but my DH would be in favour of somewhere rural. We will probably have to compromise on a large village or market town.

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DeepDown12 · 16/10/2022 07:09

City centre back in my home country. Leave UK property to DD and relocate to an apartment back where I come from. Everything near, better healthcare, cheaper, better quality food, sunshine and countryside less than an hour away.

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ThinkIGotItWrongToday · 16/10/2022 07:23

F because I want to mark a place and read all the posts! Fascinating. I'm in city now with young children, keen to leave, but hadn't thought of 25years down the line yet!

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Spookymcspookerson2022 · 16/10/2022 07:24

Great thread.

Its been interesting reading this for me because we live rurally and when we were in the neareast city yesterday (1 hour away) I hated it and thought I could never live somewhere like that.

You have all made really good points though so its something I will think about again.

The thing I would really struggle with is having neighbours.

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PuzzledObserver · 16/10/2022 08:11

Re the transport situation in the countryside: I volunteer two days a week with the local community transport scheme, taking older and disabled people who would struggle to use public transport to their various appointments.

One group I take a lot are adults with learning disabilities to and from a day centre which is in the small town where I live. In one case the round trip to fetch them is 34 miles. The other group I take are elderly people, nine times out of ten it is to the doctor’s or to one of the hospitals in the city, 8 miles away.

The ones who live in town could in theory get a bus. But this is Devon, everywhere is up a hill, and the ones who ask for transport have reached the stage where the 1/4 mile down the hill to the bus stop (and then back up again) would be too much. So instead of using their bus pass, they pay £7 for a community car to take them to the doctor’s. The ones who live out in the sticks would be buggered without our service because there is no bus, or there’s one a day and they’d have to wait till tomorrow to get one, and a taxi would charge them £15 each way.

Some of them have family or neighbours who take them some of the time and they only use us when there is no alternative. Others of them don’t have anybody local and would be stuck without us. So thank goodness for all these retirees moving to the countryside and wanting to do some volunteering, eh?

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Volterra · 16/10/2022 08:18

Further to my post above we have moved back to a house we lived in briefly for less than a year when DD was 1. Absolutely hated the area, didn’t feel safe and went to a nearby village. We then moved out of area to the south coast to edge of a market town for DH;s work.

DD hated it there. We’ve seen more of her the 2 months we have lived here than we did an entire year in our old house. She’s asleep upstairs at the moment having decided on spur of the moment yesterday morning to come back for the night. Calls it coming home which I thought she might struggle with having been in last house for 20 years.

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HowVeryBizarre · 16/10/2022 08:20

Having had a year of cancer treatment I have to say that my priority when we move (which we will in a few years when current Uni student kids leave home) will be access to medical treatment. I know that sounds so boring but I could drive for 15 minutes to my daily radiation treatment, I met lots of people who had to stay in a hotel Mon-Fri for six weeks. On that basis I don’t think we can go rural no matter now much we might want to.

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Jessiesthedog · 16/10/2022 08:23

I think Covid massively highlighted the issues locally to us if you didn’t drive or you couldn’t get a delivery spot there’s absolutely no way I would retire to the countryside following that I want to be near ammenities and I want to be less than 15 minutes from the hospital.

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FilthyforFirth · 16/10/2022 08:28

City. I made a deal with DH that we would leave London to raise the kids but we would return and retire to London.

I am a city girl, the countryside, whilst nice for a short break, bores me senseless. No way I could live somewhere coastal or rural.

Just need to earn a lot more money to afford my townhouse on Upper Street...

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ImissyouBR1 · 16/10/2022 08:28

I live in Cornwall, and cannot wait to retire in London.

Things to do ALL year, museums to engage the brain, lots of part time/ volunteering opportunity if needed, shopping, accessible high streets, health care (and the choice of private if needed!)

Here we have cobbles, narrow wonky pavements, businesses with weird open hours, non full time jobs are rare, health care is 30 ambulances queueing up at A&E and if you fall and break your hip outside in the rain then it's a 9 hour wait.
Car journeys everywhere as buses are unreliable. We barely have any train stations.

I hope we make it to London before retirement. I really do but just need to earn enough and save first. And with Cornish wages and Cornish house prices - that's going to take a LONG time!

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Fairislefandango · 16/10/2022 08:33

Countryside. I already live in the countryside though, and have done since I left London 20 years ago. I might be tempted to downsize and move to a small rural town rather than the village I live in now though, so that I have more accessible facilities and public transport to reduce the need to drive.

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MsTSwift · 16/10/2022 08:36

We’re in a small city twenty min bus to large city. Grew up in the country and still get a thrill at walking to a cocktail bars / clubs / cinemas / theatre! At rate this London will be full of the very young and very old! Appreciate beauty of the country but living there is deadly dull.

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christmassausages · 16/10/2022 08:37

City/Town centre. Good public transport would be a must so that I could get rid of the car and spend the money saved on vodka and cokes in the afternoon. 😆Seriously though, being central near shops, Dr's, bus/train station, with some outdoor space makes much more sense than living totally rurally.

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DorritLittle · 16/10/2022 08:37

I don't get why these threads are always about city or village. That isn't all there is... For me it would be a small-medium town with good transport links.

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SuperCamp · 16/10/2022 08:38

I think people leave the last move too late.

In our family I have seen the eldest generation move to lovely coastal and mountain areas, and live wonderful lives, great holiday destination for their children to bring the grandchildren, they have hosted fabulous Christmases etc.

Then frailty strikes, and they are miles from any medical facilities. Getting a carer to do a call for getting dressed and a shower in the morning is nigh on impossible because of the distance and because low population density means there aren’t any / many.

Pressured sandwich generation offspring are now dealing with crisis calls and driving for 3 hours after work / using up all holiday visiting. One half of an 85 yo couple is in rehab for 6 weeks after a stroke or broken hip, and that is a 3 hour round trip by car from home. Family use every weekend for a summer facilitating visits.

I have 3 sets of family over 90. The one who sees most of her family, has the best healthcare, sees most friends and dies most activities and is least lonely lives smack in the middle of London, with children and grandchildren in the same city.

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conkercollector · 16/10/2022 08:39

Neither. Access to the countryside important but I wouldn't want to be too far from facilities and decent transport as I got older. No desire to be in a city.

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DorritLittle · 16/10/2022 08:40

PuzzledObserver · 16/10/2022 08:11

Re the transport situation in the countryside: I volunteer two days a week with the local community transport scheme, taking older and disabled people who would struggle to use public transport to their various appointments.

One group I take a lot are adults with learning disabilities to and from a day centre which is in the small town where I live. In one case the round trip to fetch them is 34 miles. The other group I take are elderly people, nine times out of ten it is to the doctor’s or to one of the hospitals in the city, 8 miles away.

The ones who live in town could in theory get a bus. But this is Devon, everywhere is up a hill, and the ones who ask for transport have reached the stage where the 1/4 mile down the hill to the bus stop (and then back up again) would be too much. So instead of using their bus pass, they pay £7 for a community car to take them to the doctor’s. The ones who live out in the sticks would be buggered without our service because there is no bus, or there’s one a day and they’d have to wait till tomorrow to get one, and a taxi would charge them £15 each way.

Some of them have family or neighbours who take them some of the time and they only use us when there is no alternative. Others of them don’t have anybody local and would be stuck without us. So thank goodness for all these retirees moving to the countryside and wanting to do some volunteering, eh?

Rural transport volunteers are indeed undersung heroes! It is a problem lots of people don't consider.

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Scrowy · 16/10/2022 08:41

Some of them have family or neighbours who take them some of the time and they only use us when there is no alternative. Others of them don’t have anybody local and would be stuck without us. So thank goodness for all these retirees moving to the countryside and wanting to do some volunteering, eh?

its exactly people like that who move to the countryside from elsewhere to downsize in retirement, who take the affordable housing from local young families, allowing the authorities to get away with not providing decent transport services by volunteering, salving your own conscious all the while about how good you are and how much you are contributing.

what happens when you become the elderly? That's the bit most people don't consider when they retire to these places, they think about how nice it will be in their 60s and 70s rather than how they will manage in their 80s and 90s.

The ones who live out in the sticks would be buggered without our service

exactly - yet so many people decide to retire to rural properties without considering this.

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RainbowCat26 · 16/10/2022 08:42

I used to live in a city centre flat. At the time there wasn’t much available to rent and we inadvertently rented a flat in a very posh part of the city that turned out to be a block of mostly retired couples. Probably because that area had quite steep rents and wasn’t close to the bars. I used to see some of the couples on the balconies with their beautiful bistro tables and thought that would be a fantastic way to retire!

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Whatafustercluck · 16/10/2022 08:45

French countryside/ village.

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WhatWouldTheDoctorDo · 16/10/2022 08:46

I love the idea of a city centre flat, but would miss the garden and there's always the risk in noisy neighbours, so we'll likely go for suburbs (which is we're we are now). Countryside on our doorstep and just 5 miles from city centre.

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GlistersisnotGold · 16/10/2022 08:51

Not a city centre nor countryside. Have lived in both and will now stay in this market town.

I live on the very edge of this market town, one way it’s about a 10 minute walk to a Post office, co op, hairdressers, cafe, sandwich shop, chip shop, chemist , doctors surgery, dentists, dog groomers, hairdressers, florist, church. The actual town is about 1.5 miles away.

The other way it’s a 20 minute walk in to open fields and a small village that has two lovely countryside pubs.

Its around 5 miles to a city.

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catbirddogchild · 16/10/2022 08:52

Small town with all amenities and easy access to bus and trains to big city's / London for theatre trips and easy access to hospitals ect.
Have an aging MIL in central London and it's not great really. Especially as she falls down steps in her flat, had issues getting carer's due to nowhere to park, scary situations when she gets confused and gos wondering leaving front door wide open. No community really to watch out for her or notice. She is also getting scared of the crowds and noise.

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megletthesecond · 16/10/2022 08:55

City. More support and facilities. No need to drive.

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RedToothBrush · 16/10/2022 08:59

Neither. Outskirts of town with good amenities and some transport to other areas including countryside and cities.

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