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AIBU?

About what I feed my child

262 replies

Sunshineonacloud · 04/10/2022 16:24

So at a recent 2 year olds party I noticed other kids eating and drinking stuff that my dc doesn't. I've noticed it a lot on playdates recently too..

My dc is 2.5 years old. We just give him milk and water to drink and veg puffs lentil chips and baby oat bars as snacks lots of fruit and veg. Occasionally chips or a slice of margarita pizza. The odd mini milk or lick or bite of our ice cream.

I've noticed children same age snacking on walkers crisps, drinking strong ribena, eating cupcakes, grown up biscuits like bourbons and nice's, midget gems etc.

I've also noticed my 2 year old being offered sugary biscuits and mini Cheddar at playgroups and when I decline I can tell people think I'm snooty. I'm not, I just thought I was supposed to follow guidelines. I'm a first time mum so enlighten me.. do most people let their kids eat whatever? Tbh it would make my life a lot easier 😂

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ClocksGoingBackwards · 04/10/2022 18:33

Just looked up Organix baby oat bars and they're 25% sugar (even if it is 'natural' and not added sugar, it's still sugar, they just get it from a different source). So really might as well have a bourbon.

Not really. A baby organix bar will not taste as sweet as a chocolate bourbon so won’t leave a child looking for their next sugar hit.

The sugar that is naturally found in a banana or glass of milk isn’t the same as the sugar that is put in biscuits.

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Quackpot · 04/10/2022 18:34

This kind of parenting is why I had an eating disorder in adolescence.

Don't cause food issues, model healthy choices, cook health food, enable your child to make their own choices. Show them it's ok to choose a biscuit sometimes.

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pantsville · 04/10/2022 18:34

I know what you mean. There’s definitely an unspoken “transition point” when it comes to processed food and snacks.

The last 2nd birthday I went to, the kids all had quartered grapes, carrot and cucumber sticks, things like that. By the time they’re in school it’s hot dogs and a grubby sauce bottle being passed round. You just wouldn’t get that with pre schoolers.

And it carries on - not many people would pick their 5 year old up a doner kebab and a monster energy for tea, but they might for their 16 year old. A 10 year old might have a snickers and bag of spicy Doritos as a snack, don’t normally see any three year olds with that. It’s a bit disingenuous of people to suggest we haven’t all done this to an extent!

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Elphame · 04/10/2022 18:35

We definitely held the line until DS was two and the birthday parties started.

He was given one of those mini boxes of smarties and at first had no idea what they were. He cottoned on by watching the other children and it was then downhill all the way.

I'm ashamed to say that DD's first word was "wheateats" (sweeties). In my defence she was a late talker!

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LivingMyBestLie · 04/10/2022 18:35

GSat · 04/10/2022 18:23

Feeding junk food vs healthy food is million miles away from breast vs formula feeding. I kind of get what you are trying to say here but this was a very bad example. We should not be promoting little children eating sweet and salty crap. Of course it won't make much of a difference if they have it occasionally but letting them get used to it is an entirely different story.

Superiority or not, making healthy food choices for our children should be a priority. Their health is our responsibility as parents.

OP was at a party, she has no idea what they normally eat!

It's a brag post.

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NCHammer2022 · 04/10/2022 18:35

YANBU about what you feed your child but they are not BU about what they feed theirs either which is what you’re really asking.

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BlueRibbonPen · 04/10/2022 18:37

The baby stuff is just the same food in a different packet. You sound like a marketing dream OP!

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Scottishgirl85 · 04/10/2022 18:39

From your OP, the things you're giving aren't healthy, so I wouldn't be too quick to judge. Just because certain snacks are gimmicky and aimed at young children, doesn't mean they're any better than the 'adult' versions, just more expensive!

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FamSender · 04/10/2022 18:41
Biscuit
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Dagnabit · 04/10/2022 18:41

Ah, the old stealth boast. But I will deduct points for your lack of knowledge. Even ‘healthy baby food’ has lots of sugar and similar nasties in it. Plus, it’s pretty miserable if your child can’t have a proper biscuit or cake at a party!

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Riapia · 04/10/2022 18:42

Wind ‘em up and watch ‘em go OP.
😁😁😁

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broodyat39 · 04/10/2022 18:43

I've been really concerned lately with all the sugar free cordials, I'd rather have sugar, most if not all contain Acesulfame K! Both well known brands and store brands, Acesulfame K has many negative side effects including problems with eyesight, kidney function issues. Very worrying

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Meklk · 04/10/2022 18:45

Read the labels of all "baby" food - you'll be very surprised.... Most of them are WORSE than Snicker or Twix, especially these kind of granola and nut bars - loooots of sugar, colours and other shit inside.

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Disneyblueeyes · 04/10/2022 18:50

I gave up once I realised pretty much everything sold nowadays is bad for you in some way or another.

Also, toddlers don't just happily eat healthy stuff. Not in my experience anyway. You have to choose your battles a bit.

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Smellyoldowls22 · 04/10/2022 18:51

Each of my dbaby's snacks are hand made by field mice from seasonal, foraged ingredients.

She only drinks dew collected at dawn from our chamomile tranquility lawn.

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Parker231 · 04/10/2022 18:54

My DT’s were weaned on pouches and jars. At parties there are no rules - they can eat whatever they want. DT’s are now 23 - have grown up slender and healthy.
Food isn’t a battle worth fighting.

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christmastreewithhairyfairy · 04/10/2022 18:54

Yanbu for what you feed your child but yabu for extreme judginess. If you have a second, believe me they will not just live on lentil crisps 😂

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christmastreewithhairyfairy · 04/10/2022 18:56

Smellyoldowls22 · 04/10/2022 18:51

Each of my dbaby's snacks are hand made by field mice from seasonal, foraged ingredients.

She only drinks dew collected at dawn from our chamomile tranquility lawn.

😂😂😂

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MelodyPondsMum · 04/10/2022 18:56

I was strict with our first. I only allowed chocolate when they got older and I realised relatives were going to try to sneak it to them anyway. I didn't want to create a 'forbidden' food vibe around treats.
fwiw our DC (teens now) still don't really eat much chocolate and they spent most of their junior school years choosing fruit over sweets and chocolate. Maybe they'd have been like that anyway. Maybe it's because they started to like fruit and veg, and see them as snacks and treats when they were little. I don't know.
I guess what I'm saying is do whatever you feel is right and that you have the energy for Grin Don't make food a battleground and don't create a mindset about treats or forbidden food.

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Cheeselog · 04/10/2022 18:56

bathorshower · 04/10/2022 16:40

Many parents say they don't give their child sweet food, but do give them raisins. Raisins are 60% sugar - no cake I've ever made has been that sugary, and I've made a good range of cakes in my time! Have you fallen into the same trap, OP?

And what percentage of your cakes are fibre, iron, potassium etc? Yes raisins are naturally high in sugar but don't pretend they are the same as a cake.

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YesitsBess · 04/10/2022 18:58

Mine ate anything and everything generally, but wouldn’t eat the lunch at his nursery (not UK) so his nursery worker used to take him on the handlebars of her moped into the market and buy him jelly pots! I found this out 6 years later. He’s fine.

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christmastreewithhairyfairy · 04/10/2022 19:00

MelodyPondsMum · 04/10/2022 18:56

I was strict with our first. I only allowed chocolate when they got older and I realised relatives were going to try to sneak it to them anyway. I didn't want to create a 'forbidden' food vibe around treats.
fwiw our DC (teens now) still don't really eat much chocolate and they spent most of their junior school years choosing fruit over sweets and chocolate. Maybe they'd have been like that anyway. Maybe it's because they started to like fruit and veg, and see them as snacks and treats when they were little. I don't know.
I guess what I'm saying is do whatever you feel is right and that you have the energy for Grin Don't make food a battleground and don't create a mindset about treats or forbidden food.

This! I did baby led weaning with my first, only organix snacks etc, it all went out the window with no2 and they had pizza, chocolate etc much earlier... DC1 is now a sugar monster and DC2 eats pretty much everything

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HairyMcLarie · 04/10/2022 19:03

My nieces were brought up on organic lentil crisps, raisins and oat bars as my SIL would judge others for offering Wotsits and custard creams. All meals home prepared and veg heavy

They are now mid teens and since they were both around 6 they will now only eat macaroni cheese or pizza.

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ShinyMe · 04/10/2022 19:05

Wait, midget gems are grown up biscuits?

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RedRobyn2021 · 04/10/2022 19:06

I've always followed the "rules" too OP, for fear of making a mistake and I thought that's what most people did. But I don't think they do, some of the baby/toddler groups I've been to, I've been chatting with other mums and they've put their babies in their own rooms before 6 months, starting weaning before 6 months, limited breastfeeding/started weaning before their child is 12 months, let them watch TV/films, given them cake and chocolate etc

And that snooty look you're talking about, I've had that before, because I didn't give my daughter cake at a stay and play but I brought something homemade. She's actually allergic to eggs and dairy, so she couldn't have had it anyway. But it's not nice tbh.

I don't actually care much what other people do with their children, I'm more interested in my own. But it's natural to compare because you want to know if you're making the right choices, especially when it's your first time.

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