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I can never run for more than five or six minutes
27

ShouldersBackChestOutChinUp · 10/10/2021 10:54

I've couch to 5k a few times. This times I can't get past week four where you run for 3 and then 5 minutes. It's hellish. I keep trying but I can't push past it.

It's pathetic.

In between runs I walk my dogs every day for 5kms.

What can I do?

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pinknsparkly · 10/10/2021 10:58

This doesn't answer your question about running, but I've heard lots of good things about the walk-run technique called "Jeffing" (named after the man who invented it). I've not read much about it, but keep meaning to as I have the same issue as you and think that perhaps the best at forward is to accept that the walk-run method is what works for me and to stop being myself up about not being able to run for longer than a few mins! Much like you, I walk several km to work and back most days so I'm not that unfit but my lungs can't cope with running!

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FlamesEmbersAshes · 10/10/2021 11:03

Slow down. Slow right down. And then slow down some more. If you’re running at the pace of a brisk walk (or slower!) that’s fine. Pretty much everyone who can walk can run but the mistake many novices make is trying to set a pace that is much too fast.

Look up niko niko running: slowjogging.wordpress.com/

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CSJobseeker · 10/10/2021 11:05

Yes, slow down.

What pace are you doing for that 5 or 6 minutes? Add at least an extra 60s per km and see how you go.

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GoWalkabout · 10/10/2021 11:06

I find the first ten minutes of running always feel awful, explained in this quote
"Dr Mike Stroud (medic, polar explorer - with Ran Fiennes - and all round very knowledgable bloke) in his book Survival of the Fittest - Understanding Health and Peak Physical Performance.

"When you start to run your muscles need extra oxygen but your body is not set up to increase the supply immediately. For the first few minutes of a race [or any run] you develop oxygen debt as you use more energy than aerobic systems can supply. It is only when oxygen in the blood has been depleated significantly and levels of carbon dioxide have risen that your brain senses these changes and sends instructions to set things straight. At that point you will begin to breathe harder and your heart will pump more strongly. But by then , besides having to meet the demands of your continued movement, you also have to repay the oxygen debt and clear the lactic acid that has accumulated. This takes time, and so the first couple of miles of any run can be rough."

Questions - are you running slow enough (at a speed you can easily chat at?)

  • I think there's a bit of a jump at that stage of C25k - can you modify the programme or maybe do Galloway intervals and take 30 sec walk breaks every minute?
    Other tips I have read are to warm up well walking slowly, and to take five deep 'in' breaths before running (the opposite of taking deep out breaths to relax, it signals to your body to prepare for action).
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Blankspace4 · 10/10/2021 11:06

If you’re regularly walking then the issue isn’t the endurance but the speed. As others have said, actively try and slow down. A ‘run’ should really be a slow jog, especially when you’re just starting out.

Keep it up!!

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Mangozesty · 10/10/2021 11:08

Yep, I found this completed c25k quite a few years ago was then happily running 5 and 10ks regularly. Had an injury so didn't run for a couple of years, got back into again and struggled to run more than about 5 mins at once.
What really helped me was running with others and the Parkrun, I found I could just keep going.

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FuckingFabulous · 10/10/2021 11:12

Not be so hard on yourself, for a start. You can walk 5k and do so regularly. You can run for five minutes. That's far better than the majority of the population

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ShinyHatStand · 10/10/2021 11:12

Have you ever been able to run longer distances?

For me as a late recruit to exercise the key was learning that it was ok for my body to feel like I was about to die. That I just needed to keep going. And that I wouldn't actually die. For me it was mental rather that physical. Teaching my brain that I don't need to stop when my brain says I do.

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ShouldersBackChestOutChinUp · 10/10/2021 11:12

Thank you very much all.

I'm really not running fast and do brisk 5 mon warm up walk. But I will run slower.

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FrangipaniBlue · 10/10/2021 11:16

When I first set started running c25k wasn't a thing, so I just picked a route that I knew I could comfortably walk (think it was around 2 miles) and I ran until I felt I was too out of breath then walked until I got my breath back. Then I ran again and walked again, repeat for the route.

Over time I gradually found I was running for longer before I got out of breath and eventually I could run the whole 2 mile route.

I then started to gradually increase the distance half a mile at a time.

I believe this is what's now known as "Jeffing" but I didn't know that at the time!

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idontlikealdi · 10/10/2021 11:20

I have never been able to do it. I can open water swim 10k front crawl but I can't bloody run. I've stopped trying.

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ninnynonny · 10/10/2021 11:25

I'm doing a half marathon next week (scream) and have been training for it for weeks. I still have walk pauses, generally every ten minutes or so (sometimes less) It's definitely a pace thing, but also helps with 'getting there'. I can run 2 miles without stopping, but actually walking a bit means my time in that is faster!

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ninnynonny · 10/10/2021 11:29

'Jeffing' does work, but I just call it run/walk, as everyone did before it was 'invented'!

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BogRollBOGOF · 13/10/2021 16:29

I agree with trying to slow down, and if that's still not helpful, set an interval timer for a few mins of running and a short recovery walk and gradually increasing the number of repeats.

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TooExtraImmatureCheddar · 13/10/2021 16:34

Take a buddy. I started C25k with my mum recently - Mum had done it before and really struggled with the increments. When she was with me her competitive edge kicked in and she was fine. Have someone else to chat to and distract you and you won't have time to think about how hard it is!

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Shopgirl1 · 17/10/2021 21:47

Another vote for slowing down…either slow down your pace overall, or slow down when you are struggling, you will get to the point where a jog is recovery.

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CointreauVersial · 17/10/2021 21:50

Just keep repeating the week until you can do it.

And yes, run sloooowly.

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PackedintheUK · 17/10/2021 21:50

Yes, slow.down, all beginner runners go too fast.

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PiesNotGuys · 17/10/2021 21:51

Slow slow slow

Don’t take a friend, they want you to talk! Talking is hard!

Just go slower. It’s fine if you are running slower than your walking. You can get faster, later, if you like. You can work on it, or it will happen naturally to a degree.

I’ve done c25k 4 times and c210k twice and it’s all about slowing it down. Granted sometimes you feel ridiculous at your pace but you aren’t in a competition for speed or distance, it’s about those minutes. Slow it until you can do 10 minutes. Then 15 and there will then come a point where you feel like it’s easier to just carry on running than to walk.

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ItsAllGoingToBeFine · 17/10/2021 21:53

As everyone has said, slow down. Focus on running slower/ same speed as your walking pace. Teeny tiny steps at a reasonably fast pace.

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ShouldersBackChestOutChinUp · 18/10/2021 10:43

I've slowed it right down and I'm up to 20 minutes running!! So pleased. Thank you.

So, if I continue for 20 minutes at a slow pace, what can I expect? I'll eventually speed up or run for longer at slow pace?

What should I look for? Faster for 20 minutes or longer running at slower race?

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RedMarauder · 18/10/2021 10:52

So, if I continue for 20 minutes at a slow pace, what can I expect? I'll eventually speed up or run for longer at slow pace?

You will probably start running the 20 minutes faster so it takes less time to cover the same distance, or if you are just sticking to running 20 minutes e.g. you are running by time you will run further.

What is your aim? Do you want to run a marathon one day, or do you want to run 5Ks and 10Ks?

The initial training is the same, but the middle to long term training is different.

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ShouldersBackChestOutChinUp · 18/10/2021 10:57

I would like to run 10k regularly every week as a means of keeping fit and strong.

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Sidge · 18/10/2021 11:12

If you want to be strong, add in some strength training too. Especially important for women.

As your legs and core get stronger, your runs will improve.

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InTheLabyrinth · 18/10/2021 11:29

@ShouldersBackChestOutChinUp

I've slowed it right down and I'm up to 20 minutes running!! So pleased. Thank you.

So, if I continue for 20 minutes at a slow pace, what can I expect? I'll eventually speed up or run for longer at slow pace?

What should I look for? Faster for 20 minutes or longer running at slower race?

Mixing up the two is good.
So sometimes try and run that 20 min route faster, sometimes try and go at that 20min pace but keep going for longer.
Both are good, both with increase your fitness in different ways.
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