My feed
Premium

Please
or
to access all these features

Find baby name inspiration and advice on the Mumsnet Baby Names forum.

Baby names

Who actually pronounced the last syllable in Eleanor like -nor?

166 replies

misslucy92 · 09/01/2023 14:15

This is mainly for people in the Uk and Ireland (or outside of the Us) as I know that in the Us -nor is used.

But I often read that in the Uk people say -na. I don’t know if I can explain it well but I mean -nor vs -na (sort of like Elena is said sometimes). But I only like -nor, personally.

So could I get away with naming her Eleanor and saying -nor in the Uk? Do some of you pronounce it -nor?

Does Elinor change anything?

sort of wondering if I could use -nor or whether I should look for a new name. I like both spellings Eleanor and Elinor.

Also name your region or where you are approximately (only if you feel comfortable).

Thanks.

OP posts:
UserEleanor · 11/01/2023 07:49

Elena I would pronounce ElAna

UserEleanor · 11/01/2023 07:50

Based on your op question I’d choose a different name if you only like -nor

gogohmm · 11/01/2023 12:20

My friend definitely is Eleanor not "na"

TrashyPanda · 11/01/2023 12:53

PAFMO · 10/01/2023 10:07

Only in rhotic accents. As has been said a thousand times. Scottish accents are rhotic. The R is pronounced.

What about the G in dough? The L in salmon? The H in hour?

As has been said a thousand times, some English accents are non-rhotic. That doesn’t mean all accents are non-rhotic or that Scottish is the only nation that speaks rhotic English.

other accents that pronounce their Rs include Irish accents, American accents
and Canadian accents.

thats a huge part of the English speaking world.

TrashyPanda · 11/01/2023 12:58

the reason you keep having to ‘correct’ them is because the preferred pronunciation is at odds with the usual pronunciation of that sound in your region

would You apply that reasoning to names that are not English in origin? I had people try that with me, when they knew perfectly well how my name was said.
Jean in the U.K. is a girls name. In France it is a male name and pronounced differently. Nobody with an ounce of decency would use the U.K. pronunciation to a French male.

I hope.

if you tell people how to pronounce your name, they should do you the basic courtesy of using that pronunciation.

ZoyaTheDestroyer · 11/01/2023 13:25

TrashyPanda · 11/01/2023 12:58

the reason you keep having to ‘correct’ them is because the preferred pronunciation is at odds with the usual pronunciation of that sound in your region

would You apply that reasoning to names that are not English in origin? I had people try that with me, when they knew perfectly well how my name was said.
Jean in the U.K. is a girls name. In France it is a male name and pronounced differently. Nobody with an ounce of decency would use the U.K. pronunciation to a French male.

I hope.

if you tell people how to pronounce your name, they should do you the basic courtesy of using that pronunciation.

It sounds like this is personal for you and I am trying to work out your precise objection to my factual posts. I am a linguist and am viewing this from a purely practical perspective to help OP to make a decision.

If you know a person well enough to know their preferred pronunciation of their name then of course you should use it. It would be very rude not to. I have not suggested otherwise.

Nevertheless, everyone finds themselves situations where people need to sight-read their name: a supply teacher reading the register, medical notes, etc etc. If French Jean were to move to the UK then he would likely find himself addressed as 'jeen' in, for example, a doctor's waiting room, or find that email correspondents assume he is a British woman rather than a French man until they meet him in person or learn information to the contrary. In those situations it is not rude to apply the pronunciation conventions of your regional dialect to the name as written in front of you in the absence of further information. It would be rude to continue to use that pronunciation once you had been asked not to. It's unfortunate that you've used French as the example here however as in my (extensive, lived) experience they are some of the worst culprits for insisting on using their own pronunciation. Try being a Catherine or David in France and repeatedly explaining that you would prefer to be called 'cath-er-inn' or 'day-vid' and not 'cat-reen' or 'da-veed'.

If you have a preferred pronunciation which is not intuitive for the regional accent where you live then you are going to spend a lot of time educating people on it. Many people do not mind this. For others it gets very old, very quickly.

OP doesn't say where she lives, but if it is in an area where the regional accent is non-rhotic she is setting herself, and later her daughter, up for a lot of these conversations, and if she is already thinking that this will be a pain then that might influence her decisions when choosing a name. People do this all the time. You might be considering Alexander and prefer the /æ/ pronunciation (as in trap) but live in an area where the /ɑː/ pronunciation (as in half) is the norm, and the local pronunciation might affect whether you ultimately use the name.

TrashyPanda · 11/01/2023 13:46

I am a linguist

I studied linguistics at university

It's unfortunate that you've used French as the example

that’s because I am part French.

as in my (extensive, lived) experience they are some of the worst culprits for insisting on using their own pronunciation

in my personal, 60-year lived experience, the British are just as bad. Many older people from my ethnic group changed their names to English ones because of the continual mangling.

If you have a preferred pronunciation which is not intuitive for the regional accent where you live then you are going to spend a lot of time educating people on it

only if they are rude. Being told how to pronounce a name correctly, especially by the owner of that name should be sufficient. As a child, my friends had no issues. Adults were different. Of course, I am not referring to somebody encountering a name or person for the first time, when they will naturally use their habitual speech habits.

ZoyaTheDestroyer · 11/01/2023 13:48

Of course, I am not referring to somebody encountering a name or person for the first time, when they will naturally use their habitual speech habits.

This is exactly what I am talking about. We clearly agree. I have no idea why you are looking for reasons to have a go at me.

GogLais · 11/01/2023 13:50

if you tell people how to pronounce your name, they should do you the basic courtesy of using that pronunciation.
In theory, maybe, but people don't always hear the name how you say it.
My name includes a non-English sound, and it seems that many people think that the sound is a different one.

Not the actual name, but suppose my name was Llinos and if they called me Cleenose, I'd say Llinos, then thay call me Chinos (Ch like in loch) or Thlinos.

Welsh MP or MS names usually get mispronounced on the news - Nia said as Nig-ah, Eluned said as Ellen-id, Geraint said as Guh-rint, Hywel said as Hughel etc

ZoyaTheDestroyer · 11/01/2023 13:53

Nia said as Nig-ah

God, I hope that's a typo Shock

TrashyPanda · 11/01/2023 14:00

ZoyaTheDestroyer · 11/01/2023 13:48

Of course, I am not referring to somebody encountering a name or person for the first time, when they will naturally use their habitual speech habits.

This is exactly what I am talking about. We clearly agree. I have no idea why you are looking for reasons to have a go at me.

Because you were unclear in your post

and to explain that your “lived experience” is purely personal, regardless of how extensive it is, and that others will have different experiences. That does not make right and others wrong.

ZoyaTheDestroyer · 11/01/2023 14:02

I don’t believe I’ve suggested otherwise.

Have a nice day. I will leave you to it.

EmmaGrundyForPM · 11/01/2023 14:11

I'm from East Anglia and would say -nor. I do have a friend called Elinor who doesn't say -nor at the end, but that seems weird to me

Purplemagnolias · 11/01/2023 15:32

I do have a friend called Elinor who doesn't say -nor at the end, but that seems weird to me

What does she say? Elinar?

Mumsafan · 11/01/2023 15:37

My DH has a niece who has called her child Eleanor and my MIL & SIL always over emphasise the -nor bit. No idea why as the child has only ever been spoken to as Ellie

misslucy92 · 13/01/2023 17:33

I wanted to say thank you so much! It was interesting to read everything. Elinor (we like both but prefer this) is still on top but the pronunciation issue has led us to consider more names as well.

OP posts:
Please create an account

To comment on this thread you need to create a Mumsnet account.