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Who actually pronounced the last syllable in Eleanor like -nor?

166 replies

misslucy92 · 09/01/2023 14:15

This is mainly for people in the Uk and Ireland (or outside of the Us) as I know that in the Us -nor is used.

But I often read that in the Uk people say -na. I don’t know if I can explain it well but I mean -nor vs -na (sort of like Elena is said sometimes). But I only like -nor, personally.

So could I get away with naming her Eleanor and saying -nor in the Uk? Do some of you pronounce it -nor?

Does Elinor change anything?

sort of wondering if I could use -nor or whether I should look for a new name. I like both spellings Eleanor and Elinor.

Also name your region or where you are approximately (only if you feel comfortable).

Thanks.

OP posts:
Purplemagnolias · 10/01/2023 11:47

Maybe those who prefer the -nah pronunciation should spell it Elenah?

Purplemagnolias · 10/01/2023 11:48

Elenah like Susannah or Savannah etc

ZZTopGuitarSolo · 10/01/2023 12:35

We have an Eleanor in our family. DH and I pronounce it ‘nuh’ at the end and our kids pronounce it ‘nor’.

No one gets arsey about it. We just have different accents.

hippoherostandinghere · 10/01/2023 12:55

I'm Northern Irish and would pronounce it with an -er ending: el-n-er but then we have a hard r sound here in NI.

Ladyofthelake53 · 10/01/2023 14:25

I get called Helen, Helena, Elaine

ShutTheFrontDory · 10/01/2023 14:35

Eleanor with the NOR. But then I'm Italian and we pronounce the name like that. I have no idea how anyone can think it's pronounced like Elena...

Suedomin · 10/01/2023 15:00

I'm from the midlands and would pronounce it Elen Nur. Unless the person said they pronounced their name nor then I would use that

ZoyaTheDestroyer · 10/01/2023 15:32

TrashyPanda · 10/01/2023 09:34

Agree it is “nor”.

there is an R - it’s not there for artistic purposes - it has an actual function.

Scotland.

Are we still not grasping the concept of rhoticity in regional accents?

Please do tell us how you pronounce 'knight', 'wrap', and 'debt'.

Purplemagnolias · 10/01/2023 15:37

Are we still not grasping the concept of rhoticity in regional accents?

So non rhotic speakers pronounce Nor as Nah?

Neither Nor becomes Neither Nah ConfusedConfused?

ZoyaTheDestroyer · 10/01/2023 15:40

Purplemagnolias · 10/01/2023 15:37

Are we still not grasping the concept of rhoticity in regional accents?

So non rhotic speakers pronounce Nor as Nah?

Neither Nor becomes Neither Nah ConfusedConfused?

No, 'naw', to rhyme with 'saw' or 'claw'.

I do not understand the MNers who insist on pretending that they do not know how most of England, Wales, Australia and New Zealand speak. I am not Scottish and do not live in Scotland but I understand what the accents sound like.

JoyPeaceHealth · 10/01/2023 15:42

A lot of people do not grasp that the r is pronounced in most of the world.
They will attempt to spell out a name phonetically and insert an r where there isn't one!

Purplemagnolias · 10/01/2023 15:42

You say Neither Naw (to rhyme with Saw) for Neither Nor?

ZoyaTheDestroyer · 10/01/2023 15:52

Purplemagnolias · 10/01/2023 15:42

You say Neither Naw (to rhyme with Saw) for Neither Nor?

Yes. Have you never heard an RP English accent?!

ClaudiaWankleman · 10/01/2023 16:04

Purplemagnolias · 10/01/2023 15:42

You say Neither Naw (to rhyme with Saw) for Neither Nor?

Yes. Do the tiniest bit of digging around in your brain and you will have come into contact with someone who pronounces it like that.

ZoyaTheDestroyer · 10/01/2023 16:10

@Purplemagnolias here you go. Watch the first ten seconds.

m.youtube.com/watch?v=klmsCRxWYNs

TheBirdintheCave · 10/01/2023 17:59

@ZoyaTheDestroyer Ok. So... the word 'nor' is pronounced 'naw' (agreed as I say it like that too).

What do the people who say Eleanor with a 'nah' ending say for the word 'nor'? 🤷🏻‍♀️

Surely if it was an accent thing then that word and ending would be pronounced the same however you say it in your accent. E.g. if you say it with a 'nah' ending then that should be how you pronounce the word 'nor' too, yes? Otherwise it's just a choice and not an accent thing?

I think that is what the person who originally brought that up was referring to.

Mittens1717 · 10/01/2023 19:11

I'm Irish and always pronounce the nor, sounds more like ner in my accent

ZoyaTheDestroyer · 10/01/2023 19:19

TheBirdintheCave · 10/01/2023 17:59

@ZoyaTheDestroyer Ok. So... the word 'nor' is pronounced 'naw' (agreed as I say it like that too).

What do the people who say Eleanor with a 'nah' ending say for the word 'nor'? 🤷🏻‍♀️

Surely if it was an accent thing then that word and ending would be pronounced the same however you say it in your accent. E.g. if you say it with a 'nah' ending then that should be how you pronounce the word 'nor' too, yes? Otherwise it's just a choice and not an accent thing?

I think that is what the person who originally brought that up was referring to.

It is an accent thing, because pronunciation is a combination of phonetics and stresses.

In a polysyllabic word ending ‘or’ (Eleanor, Hector, director, inspector, actor) a non-rhotic English speaker will pronounce the final unstressed syllable as a schwa, the infamous ‘uh’ or ‘ah’ as described by several pp. In all of those words the stress is on the first or second syllable.

If that same speaker were to stress the final syllable, such a mockingly pretentious pronunciation of ‘ac-TOR’ then they would pronounce it with the ‘aw’ sound of ‘or’ or ‘nor’. We don’t use a schwa when pronouncing these words because as a general rule (and with some exceptions) schwas are unstressed, and in a monosyllabic word the sole syllable has the stress.

ByTheGrace · 10/01/2023 23:14

I will say that if you meet an Eleanor, don't insist she is pronouncing her own name wrongly. You'd be surprised how many do, and it's beyond rude and bloody annoying. It tends to be teachers in my experience.

Happyhappyeveryday · 10/01/2023 23:26

Wales. I would say -nor. Elinor would make everyone say it, more than Eleanor, I believe.

MajesticElephant · 11/01/2023 07:10

Wow so many people on this thread are rude. There are many Eleanor’s telling you their name is pronounced differently to the spelling, like a good proportion of the English language, yet so many other people, who have not had that name for decades telling them they are wrong! @ByTheGrace has summed it up perfectly!

Fivebeanchilli · 11/01/2023 07:19

South East and we say -nor.
Most people say -nuh but, when corrected, say it the way she prefers it.

ZoyaTheDestroyer · 11/01/2023 07:36

Fivebeanchilli · 11/01/2023 07:19

South East and we say -nor.
Most people say -nuh but, when corrected, say it the way she prefers it.

But those people are not incorrect. It’s fine to have a preferred pronunciation of your own or your child’s name but the reason you keep having to ‘correct’ them is because the preferred pronunciation is at odds with the usual pronunciation of that sound in your region.

If you have a south-east English regional accent think about how you would pronounce Hector, Taylor, navigator, governor, superior, anchor, etc etc. You almost certainly pronounce the final syllable with a schwa.

OP needs to consider that her preferred pronunciation of Eleanor is not the usual one in the region where she lives and this issue will recur, not because people are pig-headed or rude but because the preferred pronunciation is not usual in the regional accent 🤷🏻‍♀️

UserEleanor · 11/01/2023 07:44

Name changed for this.
I’m an Eleanor and all my family and myself say Eleanuh. I also abbreviated it to Ellie as soon as I could. From Wales and family from south of England

UserEleanor · 11/01/2023 07:47

As a pp said it’s a schwa sound. Do you say act-OR or actuh?

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