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AIBU?

TO leave my 14year old to babysit my 18month old whilst she has her nap today.

92 replies

Bettydownthehall · 01/07/2017 08:57

My two younger girls want to go to the school fete. 11-1pm. Then I have promised my daughter lunch out as a reward for brilliant behaviour. I am planning on taking all of the children for lunch. This will leave no space for the baby's nap and she is a nightmare without it. She reliably sleeps 3 hours per day.

I was thinking about putting the baby to nap, taking the girls to the fete and then coming back to collect them all for lunch.

14yr old could ring me if baby got up, but he is also capable of getting her out of bed and taking her down to play for a bit while I came back.

Seems sensible to me but I know the NSPCC guidelines. But...I also know my children.

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CesareBorgiasUnicornMask · 01/07/2017 08:59

I really can't see an issue with this at all. How quickly could you get home if there is some kind of problem??

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endofthelinefinally · 01/07/2017 08:59

I used to babysit for neighbours children at 14.
I cant see a problem.

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Wsix · 01/07/2017 09:00

I regularly so this. I know my eldest and wouldn't trust her to babysit over must other sitters who may be older but don't have same love and attention for the baby.

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SoupDragon · 01/07/2017 09:00

I would (or would have with DS1 as he's very sensible... DS2 notsomuch!)

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Wsix · 01/07/2017 09:00

Sorry. Major typo! I WOULD trust her

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debbs77 · 01/07/2017 09:01

There isn't (as far as I am aware) a minimum age to babysit. And like you say, you know your children. I would

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Bettydownthehall · 01/07/2017 09:01

I could be home in 10 minutes, tops. He would stay in his bedroom next to her bedroom (he has no interest in the fete)

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InDubiousBattle · 01/07/2017 09:02

I would. My sister used to watch me for short periods at that age and I used to babysit for neighbours kids at 15.

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BertrandRussell · 01/07/2017 09:03

Of course that''s fine!

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elephantpig · 01/07/2017 09:06

I would and I'd big up how proud you are of him / how responsible he is etc. I think teenagers like to feel responsible / grown up etc particularly if there are younger siblings.
(Obvs assuming he doesn't mind watching her)

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EasterRobin · 01/07/2017 09:07

That's a reasonable age to babysit, so if your eldest is responsible (and is willing to call emergency services in the very unlikely event they are needed) then it seems fine.

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barrygetamoveonplease · 01/07/2017 09:08

No, don't do that. It is an unreasonable burden of responsibility for a fourteen-year-old. The baby is your child, your responsibility, not your teenager's.

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hippadoppaloppagorillapig · 01/07/2017 09:08

As long as your 14 year old is sensible & trustworthy, which it sounds like he is, I don't see a problem with it.

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BertrandRussell · 01/07/2017 09:09

"would and I'd big up how proud you are of him / how responsible he is etc."

Really? Blimey. At 14 I would expect mine to give me a very Hmm look if I did that sort of CBeebies stuff about a perfectly normal bit of family life!

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Trampire · 01/07/2017 09:11

I would totally do that.

My friend used to pay my niece at that age in the school holidays to mind her two young dd's as she had to work (from home) for a few hours in holidays etc. Dd used to take them to the park, out for ice-cream etc. Dd's loved it.

With some exceptions I think most 14's year olds are responsible enough to mind a small child at home for an hour.

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elephantpig · 01/07/2017 09:12

BertrandRussell
I just meant in the way that you would a mate if it was last notice (which it is)
Oh thanks, your such a star, this is a massive help
Not,
Wow, thanks Mummy's special boy, who's my best boy?!

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Kim82 · 01/07/2017 09:12

I would do it. I've left my 15 year old ds with 2 year old dd whilst I nipped out. He's responsible and I trust him to look after her. Ive also nipped out to pick dh up from a night out whilst she is in bed asleep and ds has kept an ear out for her too. It's fine imo.

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welshweasel · 01/07/2017 09:14

Yes no issue with it at all, especially as they will be asleep for the majority of the time. My 15 year old DSD babysits for our 18 month old in the evenings, I wouldn't venture far away though.

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KoalaDownUnder · 01/07/2017 09:16

The baby is your child, your responsibility, not your teenager's

She's asking him to babysit for a couple of hours in the middle of the day, not adopt her. Hmm

There's some weird thing on MN about never asking a child to watch younger siblings. Meanwhile, back in the real world...

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BertrandRussell · 01/07/2017 09:17

Fair enough. I just don't believe in massive praise for normal family stuff. We all do things that help the "family community" run smoothly- whether it's keeping an eye on a sibling, setting the table or doing the washing up.

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EdmundCleverClogs · 01/07/2017 09:17

I used to do it but I expected extra pocket money or similar for doing so. In my mind, babysitting went beyond 'normal chores', and sometimes interfered with my own teenage plans. Oh, and I hope you've asked him if he's ok to do it, not expected it, that would be rather unfair.

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Coffeetasteslikeshit · 01/07/2017 09:17

I don't see why you wouldn't tbh. I was babysitting other people's babies at 14.

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Yukbuck · 01/07/2017 09:18

I was babysitting at 14. Youngest age I babysat at 14 was a 4 month old I think. We were fine. Parents were close by.

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BertrandRussell · 01/07/2017 09:19

"In my mind, babysitting went beyond 'normal chores', and sometimes interfered with my own teenage plans."

Well, if it interfered with the teenagers plans, then of course. But this isn't- it's helping to make sure a family event later is fun for everyone.

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Onceinabuemoon · 01/07/2017 09:19

Of course it's ok, as long as you trust he's sensible and can get hold of you, it's a complete none issue.

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