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Pedants' corner

Am I as dull as...

26 replies

ortonym · 07/01/2023 01:27

Dishwater
or as dull as ditchwater
Probably both 😃
But which one do you know/use?
Any more ambiguous phrases out there?

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MiddleOfTheNightAgain · 07/01/2023 01:31

Ditchwater here.

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waynesworldpartytimeexcellent · 07/01/2023 01:31

Ditchwater

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RedDiamond · 07/01/2023 01:34

Ditchwater

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Willowkins · 07/01/2023 01:41

Ditchwater but I'm a pedant too. I seem to remember my DDad sometimes saying his tea was like dishwater, meaning it was too weak.

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SproutsLCerVEGNoEgg · 07/01/2023 01:42

Grew up with 'dishwater' but I suspect the correct version is ditchwater.

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Soozikinzii · 07/01/2023 01:55

Only ever heard Ditchwater up here in Wigan .

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Pixiedust1234 · 07/01/2023 01:55

It's ditchwater.

I hadn't heard of dish water until mid twenties as it was/is generally referred to as washing up water. Dishwater is from adult books (as opposed to children), and not real life discussions.

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WandaWonder · 07/01/2023 01:57

I think I always heard dishwater but now not so sure

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Tessisme · 07/01/2023 02:07

Definitely ditchwater!

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user764329056 · 07/01/2023 02:27

Always ditchwater

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FurryDandelionSeekingMissile · 07/01/2023 02:32

I've only ever heard dishwater IRL, though in books I'm sure I've seen ditchwater.

My dishwater can be quite exciting, though. Never quite sure what DP might have set to lurk in there. Gelatinous spaghetti monster with a heart of sharpened steel? Delicate double-walled glass wedged beneath a 2kg skillet and decorated with wafts of partially-disintegrated jam jar label? You never know what you might find.

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DramaAlpaca · 07/01/2023 02:39

It's ditchwater. At least it was originally.

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CavalierApproach · 07/01/2023 02:44

Dull as ditchwater, but I’ve also seen references to “dishwater” (weak) tea.

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Findyourneutralspace · 07/01/2023 02:51

Its ditchwater, but I suspect dishwater may be duller

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ortonym · 07/01/2023 12:20

General consensus is "ditchwater", which is what I've always used - although I've heard both. What prompted me to ask is that there was a question on The Chase UK:
"Someone who is boring is said to be as what as dishwater?".
I wondered if this had become the norm.

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KangarooKenny · 07/01/2023 12:21

Ditch water. Never heard anything else used.

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MassiveSalad22 · 07/01/2023 12:24

Wow never heard or seen or read ditchwater in this context before! Or any context probably. But I am clearly in the minority along with The Chase 😄

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MassiveSalad22 · 07/01/2023 12:25

Just asked DH who is from the other end of the country to me and he’s never heard ditchwater either!

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ortonym · 07/01/2023 12:30

MassiveSalad22 · 07/01/2023 12:25

Just asked DH who is from the other end of the country to me and he’s never heard ditchwater either!

I'm in the North of England. My dad was from the midlands and he always used ditchwater (when I say he "used" it, I mean he said it 😂). I shall do a straw poll in the pub tonight.

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KnickerlessParsons · 07/01/2023 12:47

Dishwater (Wales).

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PAFMO · 07/01/2023 19:02

A quick google says both are correct. Ditchwater was the original which some speakers changed into dishwater in the early 1900s.
I've only ever heard and used ditchwater but, like others, only in the context of the idiom. (and spellcheck doesn't like it at all!)

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shadypines · 24/02/2023 12:28

Dishwasher for me but as they're both dull I'd happily use either!

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follyfoot37 · 28/02/2023 11:05

Ditchwater!

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sallyfacts · 28/02/2023 11:34

Ditchwater

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MurderAtTheBeautyPageant · 28/02/2023 11:43

It's ditchwater but I would guess that dishwater has taken over at this point

Same as tenterhooks/tenderhooks and 'you've got another think/thing coming'.

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