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AIBU?

Children as young as 8! being conned and manipulated by the "beauty" industry

106 replies

hatetheexploitationofinnocentgirls · 27/01/2024 05:21

And of course it is almost all girls getting told they need to put chemicals on their skin to look "pretty". Then they will be told they have to cover their faces up completely in make up to be acceptable to be seen in public.

Why are parents not protecting their daughters from this blatantly misogynistic and physically and emotionally damaging exploitation?

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-67993618

Sadie with her skincare

Growing skincare use by children is dangerous, say dermatologists

Dermatologists say products with ingredients potentially harmful to children are growing popular.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-67993618

OP posts:

Am I being unreasonable?

141 votes. Final results.

POLL
You are being unreasonable
5%
You are NOT being unreasonable
95%
CaramelizedToffee · 27/01/2024 05:27

However why do any of these kids have phones and access to tiktok? None of mine had phones until 14+

SweetFemaleAttitude · 27/01/2024 05:30

Any 8 year old using chemicals on their skin, has too much unfiltered access to the internet, plus thick parents. Bad combination.

The headline is incorrect though. It should be; 'Stupid parents buying their young daughters, unsuitable skincare products'

WandaWonder · 27/01/2024 05:31

How many parents are obsessed with their looks themselves botox, fake tan, getting their nails done, anti aging, getting their hair done all the time?

Maybe they should lead by example or stop this 'but I am doing this for meeeee'

hatetheexploitationofinnocentgirls · 27/01/2024 05:31

Its grim, isn't it. how can any parent be allowing such young children to be filling their heads with this crap. How are you going to get these girls to break free of this toxic mind set once it has taken hold?

I was worried enough about my niece when she was allowed to start experimenting with these products as a young teen - she is late 20s now, and can't face the day without her "full face" on - God knows what it has cost her in time and money and self esteem over the last decade.

OP posts:
WandaWonder · 27/01/2024 05:34

How many make up, hair kits do people buy 4 year olds 'oh it's just them being like mummy'

Wadermellone · 27/01/2024 05:40

The main issue is parents indulging this sort of thing.

The issue is them having access to TikTok at such a young age.

The issue is parents either buying these things themselves or giving very young kids money with no supervision.

Kids on social media will always want to be like the ones 5-10 years old than they are. It’s parents jobs to to step in and draw the lines on what appropriate.

I don’t think parents have to stop their own skincare or skin care regime or Botox etc. It’s really ok for adults to do something while saying no to their kids doing it. My mum had her roots bleached every 6 weeks. I remember wanting to be blonde like her. It was a simple no. I was too young. That’s it.

Same with my daughter. I wasn’t going to not get my hair dyed because she was asking for hers done. She just got told no and waited til she was older.

Fraaahnces · 27/01/2024 06:09

It’s not just kids being manipulated by the industry… Someone is buying them this crap.

Sofabum · 27/01/2024 06:28

Looking after your skin isn't a bad thing though, it's just the products they're using.

I would encourage my dd to use spf for example and as she gets older to use simple cleansers. I suffered hugely with my skin as a teenager and I wish I'd had access to more products than harsh clearasil.

But yes, DC clearly should not be using acids and serums etc.

Fraaahnces · 27/01/2024 06:49

I emphasized all over hygiene and repeated application of sunscreen (we live in Aus.) until their skin changed and then introduced gentle products - if they were interested.

cloudtree · 27/01/2024 07:11

This isn’t a new thing.

Im 50 this year. In my day the same stuff was out there it’s just it was in just17 magazine etc. I remember being ecstatic about getting a make up set from my older cousin for Christmas when I was 10. I spent a good chunk of the school holidays before senior school practising and went to senior school on the first day wearing amazing purple eyeliner, mascara, blusher and Rimmel heather shimmer Lipstick. I was far from the only girl wearing make up. Admittedly my moisturiser was only my mums “borrowed” Oil of Ulay” with a generic “toner” but that’s because that’s all there was.

I also bleached my moustache and plucked my eyebrows at that age and did my nails far more frequently than I do nowadays!

DanglingMod · 27/01/2024 07:17

The earlier and earlier obsession with skincare and makeup is having a hugely detrimental impact on their education, too. Parents might believe it's just a harmless thing to indulge but probably would be shocked if they could see their daughters in lessons, taking out their lotions and potions and glosses and mascaras and hairbrushes and then being surprised when they're told to put it all away and actually focus on their learning. What with trying to get out of lessons to vape and now skincare taking up the rest of their mind space, there is a large minority who spend next to no time on learning during the school day.

cariadlet · 27/01/2024 07:35

Our headteacher made an announcement in assembly yesterday that makeup is not part of our school uniform and that children shouldn't be wearing it to school. From next week, anyone with makeup will be given a wipe and sent to the toilets to clean it off.

This is primary!

I teach younger ones so hadn't realised that some girls had come to school wearing makeup. At that age, the parents would have seen it and condoned it.

KimberleyClark · 27/01/2024 07:47

I’ve read on here before about kids as young as 10 wanting beauty products like Amphora for their birthdays. I think it’s terrible. I feel the same way about children even younger than that wanting to remove their body hair. It’s all about “beauty” and what society perceives as “unsightly”. They should still be being children.

Northernsouloldies · 27/01/2024 07:55

Dermatologists have stated these products are not good for young skin and will cause problems later. Drunk elephant was one brand that was highlighted.

Stormbornform · 27/01/2024 08:22

It's not even tick tock/ YouTube etc my 12 year old has no access to these but it's her peers who influence her and tell her she needs to be using x y and z.

Fetchthevet · 27/01/2024 08:33

I can't believe the prices of some of these creams 8 year old are using - £60 for a moisturiser?? My DD is 13 and uses Simple cleanser and moisturiser, which I personally think is enough for her young skin.

quisensoucie · 27/01/2024 08:42

So none of you experimented with your mum's make-up when you were young? Never saved your pocket money to buy an eye-shadow palette in Boots?
None of this is new. Girlies (and grown women) always fall for the foufou packaging and marketing bollocks that stuff will make you look 20 years younger
Parents should be monitoring access to SM. And what kid is able to afford this shit? The drunk elephant stuff most want is £££. Clearly too much pocket money

sheflieswithherownwings · 27/01/2024 08:46

On one FB page at Christmas there were so many posts asking what to get 8 to 10 year old girls and I was honestly shocked at the number of replies saying Drunk Elephant or a mini fridge for all their skin care ‘bits’. And these products are £60 each! It’s totally bonkers. My DD9 had not thankfully shown any interest in it but she doesn’t have access to TikTok and I don’t think her friends are into it thankfully. They’re outside rollerblading or playing with Barbie’s or lego / play mobile as they should be!

KimberleyClark · 27/01/2024 08:51

When I was 13 I was buying Boots 17 orange blossom moisturiser and Anne French cleansing milk. Not bloody Drunk Elephant.

Meadowfinch · 27/01/2024 08:57

Why do 8yos have phones or unsupervised access to TikTok?

How can children of 8 afford such cosmetics on their own?

I suppose if a child sees their mother wasting time & money on botox, fillers, fake tans and cosmetic surgery, then the child will copy them and think such rubbish is necessary.

In the end it comes down to bad parenting, poor judgement and not knowing when to say no.

shockeditellyou · 27/01/2024 08:59

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WandaWonder · 27/01/2024 09:02

quisensoucie · 27/01/2024 08:42

So none of you experimented with your mum's make-up when you were young? Never saved your pocket money to buy an eye-shadow palette in Boots?
None of this is new. Girlies (and grown women) always fall for the foufou packaging and marketing bollocks that stuff will make you look 20 years younger
Parents should be monitoring access to SM. And what kid is able to afford this shit? The drunk elephant stuff most want is £££. Clearly too much pocket money

Edited

No I had no interest in make up or hair or fake tan when I was a child nor do I now

Not all girls fall for it

BlindurErBóklausMaður · 27/01/2024 09:04

There's a massive difference between digging in your mum's makeup bag and badly applying her lipstick (to be told to scrub it off- I remember upending a bottle of foundation on my friend's leg when we were about 8 and getting into Big Trouble) and being allowed and encouraged to get into hardcore skincare with actives.

Drunk Elephant as above is one of the worst offenders and IMO, should be boycotted.

Nadine Baggott, who I generally have a lot of time for, did a live with her mate and fellow influencer Jo Jones just before Christmas and it cropped up in their conversation that Jo's "girls were now using actives". Out of curiosity, because she looks so young, I looked up the ages of her daughters- young teens. Who, unless they have hormonal breakouts, in which case the active could be a salicylic acid product and would be recommended by dermatologists- should have no need for any other "active"

BoohooWoohoo · 27/01/2024 09:12

It’s not manipulation by the industry, it’s parents buying expensive skincare with actives for young kids that’s the problem. Young kids know about premium brands like Drunk Elephant because parents aren’t monitoring their internet activity and the algorithms are sending them hours and hours of advertising.
I suspect that the industry is surprised by this trend of 9 year olds paying Sephora prices and will be developing more products targetted at this new market.

greengreengrass25 · 27/01/2024 09:14

Fetchthevet · 27/01/2024 08:33

I can't believe the prices of some of these creams 8 year old are using - £60 for a moisturiser?? My DD is 13 and uses Simple cleanser and moisturiser, which I personally think is enough for her young skin.

Who is daft enough to buy it for them

I wouldn't buy one at that price myself but I like skincare products

Teenagers fair enough

I remember using Clarins when I was 18 but earned my own money

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