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AIBU?

For finding the term "registered disabled" annoying?

201 replies

BobbyBiscuits · 09/01/2024 04:14

As background, I worked on behalf of the DWP for 15 years, and one project was developing the process/ forms etc for DLA to PIP transition. It was not a nice workplace but I really enjoyed speaking to the clients and getting their voices heard. (I was too junior for any decision making and simply interviewed clients in view to designing the forms etc)

After a MH breakdown, I found myself in the same position as my clients and now claim both PIP and ESA. I have MH which has now generated PH issues. My family are also on same/ blue badge etc.

For some reason recently this terminology has been annoying me...I hear a lot of people describing themselves as "registered disabled'. Why not just say 'disabled'?

This is a voluntary self reporting scheme that some councils offer. There is no such thing in any meaningful terms. Disability is a spectrum and how if affects each person is very different. I hate the benefit system and am not advocating it but get frustrated when people use this terminology as it's meaningless.

There is no register of disabled people, and it's really misleading. It can muddy the waters when people seek help.

I'm not blaming disabled people, but whoever started the terminology.

Any thoughts on this?

OP posts:

Am I being unreasonable?

313 votes. Final results.

POLL
You are being unreasonable
44%
You are NOT being unreasonable
56%
Fraaahnces · 09/01/2024 04:26

I guess it feels like being a registered dog or something that potentially needs “control”. I hate it too.

quisensoucie · 09/01/2024 06:29

People are also registered blind, etc.
To be on a register can confer certain help and benefits. For example, tv license cost if you are registered blind.
So, it isn't just semantics, it is a status

x2boys · 09/01/2024 06:33

Its annoying but sometimes it can be difficult enough to prove disability
Maybe some people who.are in receipt of PIP feel that validate,s there disability?
Both my boys have disabilities my oldest was diagnosed with Diabetes last year but he wouldn't be eligible for pip despite it being s life long life changing condition.
And my youngest has severe autism and learning disabilities and he is in receipt of DLA at the highest levels

soupfiend · 09/01/2024 06:35

Yes I hate it, theres no such thing

You see it all the time on these forums though as it it confers some special meaning

autienotnaughty · 09/01/2024 06:39

Agree completely it feels like something you have to say to validate your condition really annoying

NCfor24 · 09/01/2024 06:44

Also hate it. Filled in a form for my son last week. It was a tick box for registered disabled. I didn't tick it but wrote EHCP alongside it. He is autistic. He needs support. We get DLA. But nowhere is he "registered disabled".

AreolaGrande · 09/01/2024 06:45

quisensoucie · 09/01/2024 06:29

People are also registered blind, etc.
To be on a register can confer certain help and benefits. For example, tv license cost if you are registered blind.
So, it isn't just semantics, it is a status

Except there is no such thing as one centralised disability register?

You can have diagnoses, be in receipt of PIP, have a blue badge, have aids and adaptions in your home but none of these lead to your name being added to any kind of 'disability register' as no such thing exists.

YANBU OP.

Sahara123 · 09/01/2024 06:52

Completely agree. My daughter is disabled and I have often wondered where this mythical register is .

quisensoucie · 09/01/2024 06:58

@soupfiend Yes, it does have a status
As I said, being registered confers certain benefits

Fedupandconfused0815 · 09/01/2024 07:00

I agree, as if it's just as simple in many cases to register themselves disabled. There is no bloody register!!!

Many places only accept a Pip or Dla award as evidence and having worked for these evil people yourself, you will know that getting rejected mean nothing as you throw people under the bus in bucket loads in the name of saving money.

Tumbleweed101 · 09/01/2024 07:00

I just assumed it meant people who'd had their disability acknowledged such as approval for financial support, blue badges, help schemes (eg blind).

soupfiend · 09/01/2024 07:02

quisensoucie · 09/01/2024 06:58

@soupfiend Yes, it does have a status
As I said, being registered confers certain benefits

You seem obsessed with this status

Registered where, with whom, do you get a card in the post?

I have a number of conditions which meet the criteria of a disability under the EA. Where do I register them all?

AreolaGrande · 09/01/2024 07:03

So talk us, step by step, through exactly how one goes about registering for this list @quisensoucie?

Stubbedtoes · 09/01/2024 07:03

Whilst I see what you mean, I think lots of people use expressions like that. For example, you say you 'have MH'. Well we all have MH. If you look at that expression too deeply it makes no sense. However, we all know what you mean - that you have poor MH.

Same with 'registered disabled' surely. Obviously there's no central register of disabled people but when people use it about themselves they presumably mean they are officially recognised as disabled in some way - i.e. they have a blue badge or are in receipt of pip or whatever.

I am surprised to see a pp say it was used on an official form though!

Mairzydotes · 09/01/2024 07:05

I thought it meant a proper diagnosis. It also differs from an injury .

Mamansparkles · 09/01/2024 07:06

Some county councils hold a register of disabled people. Some don't. I've lived in counties where they do and where they don't so just because yours doesn't have a register doesn't mean they don't exist.

It is voluntary self reporting but they do reject applications if they dont think you are sufficiently disabled for them.

Soontobe60 · 09/01/2024 07:08

This may be controversial, but I do think there should be some way of recording the numbers of people with a ‘diagnosed’ disability. Thats the best way that services can be planned for and provided in enough quantity to truly support those who have a disability. But it’s up to those people living with their disability to determine how such a system would be managed.

Benibidibici · 09/01/2024 07:09

These days there are a surprising number of self diagnosed people. I suppose some people who have a clinically verified diagnosis supporting their receipt of pip etc might seek comfort in having a clinical diagnosis as validating their position.

TigerRag · 09/01/2024 07:10

You can only register as sight impaired / partially sighted or blind and deaf and there's a learning disability register.

But yes I do know what the op means. It is annoying when people say that when there's no register.

Fedupandconfused0815 · 09/01/2024 07:11

Soontobe60 · 09/01/2024 07:08

This may be controversial, but I do think there should be some way of recording the numbers of people with a ‘diagnosed’ disability. Thats the best way that services can be planned for and provided in enough quantity to truly support those who have a disability. But it’s up to those people living with their disability to determine how such a system would be managed.

What is that even supposed to mean? Millions of millions of 'registered' disabled people should determine how that system is managed?

What purpose would that register serve and what would it manage???

Benibidibici · 09/01/2024 07:12

Id also it assumed possibly a degree of permanance vs shorter term injury etc.

Eg you could have severe depression for a year but recover. An individual with cerebral palsy or a missing limb or sight impairment or autism will live with that for life.

quisensoucie · 09/01/2024 07:13

Ok, everyone! I apologise. I am in the wrong re registering disability.

Benibidibici · 09/01/2024 07:14

What purpose would that register serve and what would it manage???

Planning for provision of funding and services? Analysis eg if there are spikes in disability in specific council areas, why? Learning from areas with low rates of disability - are they providing better care and support that means people with temporary conditions recover better? Are they providing services that are having a preventative effect, particularly with regard to mental health?

Fedupandconfused0815 · 09/01/2024 07:15

Benibidibici · 09/01/2024 07:14

What purpose would that register serve and what would it manage???

Planning for provision of funding and services? Analysis eg if there are spikes in disability in specific council areas, why? Learning from areas with low rates of disability - are they providing better care and support that means people with temporary conditions recover better? Are they providing services that are having a preventative effect, particularly with regard to mental health?

Yeah, right!

TigerRag · 09/01/2024 07:18

Fedupandconfused0815 · 09/01/2024 07:11

What is that even supposed to mean? Millions of millions of 'registered' disabled people should determine how that system is managed?

What purpose would that register serve and what would it manage???

Evidence of disability that doesn't mean carrying a pip letter. It also means those who are disabled not on pip have proof.

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