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AIBU?

To send DS to Welsh speaking secondary?

128 replies

HeartShapedBoxes · 26/09/2022 23:16

Recently had to move in with my mum and found that the English speaking secondary school in catchment is awful. Really, really bad. There is a Welsh speaking secondary school - but DS doesn’t speak much Welsh. Would I be completely mad to send him there if I can? He’s in year 6 so it’s a pressing problem right now

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Am I being unreasonable?

186 votes. Final results.

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You are being unreasonable
82%
You are NOT being unreasonable
18%
user1477391263 · 30/09/2022 01:27

Although I'm really happy that Welsh medium (full or mixed) is becoming the default option in Wales, my own personal feeling is if Welsh medium becomes the norm all over Wales, then cities in Wales would be advised to ensure, going ahead, that each city has one secondary school offering an "international student" track, in which kids with no Welsh can come in, and study Welsh from scratch as a separate class while doing their academics in English. Otherwise, it's going to place barriers in the path of anyone trying to relocate to Wales for business reasons, which ultimately will not be good for Wales as it's a good thing to be able to attract outside talent as and when you need it.

I live in an non-English-speaking country, and the biggest cities do offer low-cost English track options like this for foreigners who come in with their kids. The aim is to ensure that talent can be recruited easily without barriers; if parents have to pay for international education, it means that only the richest will be able to do this (or those whose companies are able to offer really fat expat packages), and rules out things like working for a small firm.

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justasking111 · 30/09/2022 04:41

user1477391263 · 30/09/2022 01:27

Although I'm really happy that Welsh medium (full or mixed) is becoming the default option in Wales, my own personal feeling is if Welsh medium becomes the norm all over Wales, then cities in Wales would be advised to ensure, going ahead, that each city has one secondary school offering an "international student" track, in which kids with no Welsh can come in, and study Welsh from scratch as a separate class while doing their academics in English. Otherwise, it's going to place barriers in the path of anyone trying to relocate to Wales for business reasons, which ultimately will not be good for Wales as it's a good thing to be able to attract outside talent as and when you need it.

I live in an non-English-speaking country, and the biggest cities do offer low-cost English track options like this for foreigners who come in with their kids. The aim is to ensure that talent can be recruited easily without barriers; if parents have to pay for international education, it means that only the richest will be able to do this (or those whose companies are able to offer really fat expat packages), and rules out things like working for a small firm.

This is my concern too. Our NHS in Wales would fall off a cliff employment wise for a start. The calibre of many public jobs ditto. International investment. Which is why I can't see it happening. We don't have enough teachers as it is.

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KirstenBlest · 03/10/2022 18:13

@RedHelenB , I caught myself saying 'o shit, mae'n bloody mobile yn fucked' but it doesn't mean that Welsh is dead, it means I am sloppy (and sweary when I drop my phone).
Just as if I said 'Oh shit, my bloody mobile is fucked' would show that my speech is sloppy.

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