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Is it illegal to kill a wild animal at work?
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SilverDoe · 27/01/2022 09:57

Posting for traffic. Is illegal/possible to pursue for animal cruelty if someone kills a wild animal in their work place?

I have been googling but I can only find information really regarding livestock and pets.

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Santahasjoinedww · 27/01/2022 09:58

Sounds grim.

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MatildaTheCat · 27/01/2022 09:59

Are we talking rat or elephant?

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DropYourSword · 27/01/2022 09:59

Spider or deer

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TyrionsNextWife · 27/01/2022 09:59

It would surely depend on the circumstances. Someone killing a swan in an office carpark for fun would be illegal, but a gameskeeper shooting an injured deer to put it out of its misery wouldn’t be 🤷‍♀️

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Vapeyvapevape · 27/01/2022 10:00

I think we need more information!

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QuestionsorComments · 27/01/2022 10:00

What kind of wild animal? I have arranged for the culling of foxes, squirrels and rats as part of my work. That's definitely not illegal, but necessary to keep everyone safe and hygienic.

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ToykotoLosAngeles · 27/01/2022 10:00

This is not a thread title I was expecting!

It depends on the animal.

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InstantUserNameJustAddWater · 27/01/2022 10:00

Wildlife law tends to be more about what animal it is, how rare it was and whether you were cruel rather than locations like workplace. There's not much to go on in your post - can you explain a bit more?

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daimbarsatemydogsbone · 27/01/2022 10:00

@DropYourSword

Spider or deer

Grin
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Getyourjinglebellsinarow · 27/01/2022 10:00

Depends who, what animal, why, and how.

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neverknowinglyunreasonable · 27/01/2022 10:01

I feel like there's more information to come here.....

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Redbeanpasta · 27/01/2022 10:02

You need to give more context.

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candycane222 · 27/01/2022 10:03

Some animals (quite a lot) are classified as vermin which affects the legalilties. There are also rules re pain and distress. While I am not sure they are 100% reliable the RSPCA might have info on this?

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SilverDoe · 27/01/2022 10:03

We have a local very friendly magpie. He is wild, not hand reared or anything but very friendly and people oriented, quite well known.

He lived near the local shops, right next to my DC's school, and recently had hopped into the local shop a couple of times.

My partner took our DC to school this morning and a lady from the school was shouting at the manager. He obviously heard and it has transpired that he has taken it upon himself to kill this poor creature :(

I'm deeply upset. Many people knew of the magpie and it's right next to a primary school ffs. I want to take action against him if at all possible.

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SilverDoe · 27/01/2022 10:04

Sorry with regards to mentioning that it was in this person's work place, I was wondering if they could be in trouble in a work capacity if not with the law.

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DropYourSword · 27/01/2022 10:05

Did he have a reason to?
Was it injured and he put it out of its misery for example?
I still think you need more context!

Also magpies here in Australia are freaking lunatics that swoop you and attack cars. They're bloody mental!

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TyrionsNextWife · 27/01/2022 10:06

What country are you in, the laws are different between Scotland and England etc.

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Sciurus83 · 27/01/2022 10:06

Being at work is not relevant unless there is a specific policy which would be unusual but as others say you really need to provide more information! It will depend on the animal, how it was killed etc whether it was legal.

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Winniemarysarah · 27/01/2022 10:06

Do you mean he’s already killed it, or he’s planning to?

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yoyo1234 · 27/01/2022 10:07

Now we know it is a bird (vertebrate -it makes a difference with certain laws). Method is important.

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Littlegoth · 27/01/2022 10:07

Is it a squirrel? (It’s illegal to release captured grey squirrels back into the wild, humane killing is mandatory).

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SilverDoe · 27/01/2022 10:07

No it was not injured or suffering in any way. It was friendly, it would approach people and do stuff like pull their shoe laces which I've read is a sign of play.

I know it sounds crazy and over the top but I'm so horrified that instead of just calling the RSPCA, or taking it to the pretty local wild animal hospital, or even just shooing the bloody thing outside, he chose to kill it :(

It was also just one single magpie, it's not like it was a pest/infestation issue or anything.

I do not have details on how he killed the magpie.

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Soubriquet · 27/01/2022 10:08

I would probably say it’s legal depending on the animal. A magpie would be fine for example. A roe deer not.

I work in a supermarket and pigeons get in sometimes. If we can’t get them out, a man is called in to shoot them.

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QuestionsorComments · 27/01/2022 10:08

You are allowed to "control" magpies as they can be a pest but you need a licence.

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SilverDoe · 27/01/2022 10:08

We live in England. Thank you really for the help. I have emailed a complaint but it is a large chain brand of shops so it's just a generic customer complaint email/web form thing.

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