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AIBU?

Status discrimination

45 replies

ambm70 · 30/07/2017 17:32

Can anyone tell me why marital status is necessary for car insurance? I cant see how your status is relevant and feel it is discriminatory on every level. Why would being married, single or living with someone matter? We all have moments in our day that can affect our driving, my status isn't one of them.

OP posts:
EyeHalveASpellingChequer · 30/07/2017 17:35

Statistically, people in long-term relationships are less likely to be involved in accidents than people who are single.

Before 2012 when gender discrimination laws came into force, insurers would usually give higher quotes to men because they are, statistically, more likely to be involved in accidents.

x2boys · 30/07/2017 17:37

Apparently they do an algorithm of who is more likely to have a crash I cant see why living in a council house makes you more likely to have an accident either bit apparently it does according to dh insurers Hmm

Notreallyarsed · 30/07/2017 17:38

It doesn't make you more likely to be in an accident, but apparently it makes it more likely your car will be nicked or damaged. Our insurance is higher because we live on a council estate, despite having off road parking.

Fresh8008 · 30/07/2017 17:45

why marital status is necessary for car insurance
Well its not necessary is it, its just one of many factors. I can certainly imagine that a married person would drive more safely that a single person. For one when you get married you are more likely to have responsibilities which mature you and make you think about another people in your life. A single person might take more risks as they have no one to think of but themselves.

GetOutOfMYGarden · 30/07/2017 17:48

Before 2012 when gender discrimination laws came into force, insurers would usually give higher quotes to men because they are, statistically, more likely to be involved in accidents.

They still do. I was doing a compare the market search and forgot to change 'mr' to 'miss'. Fixing that made it £500 less.

araiwa · 30/07/2017 17:58

Have you reported compare the market yet for such discriminatory behaviour?? Thats shocking and illegal

ambm70 · 30/07/2017 17:59

I would like to know when these stats were collated. Modern society has changed so much in recent years with relationship statuses being much broader than they were even 20 years ago. I just feel that we can all be discriminated against, one way or another, based on your situation.

OP posts:
Sirzy · 30/07/2017 18:02

It's based on statistical risk levels so although it seems unfair it's no different to your postcode or job having an impact.

It's why I was pissed off when the gender part was taken away - why is it ok to ignore one risk factor but not the many others they use!

writergirl747474 · 30/07/2017 18:03

@fresh8008

What a load of bollocks. Married people are not more mature than single people, they are just more married. Single people tend to be poorer so probably drive more safely to avoid the expense of a crash - no hubby to lend you his car or give you lifts.

And single people don't just "think of themselves" - they have parents, siblings, nieces, nephews, friends etc too.

Tossers drive recklessly and plenty of married people are tossers.

Parents probably drive more safely with kids in the car but you don't need to be coupled up to have a child.

If married people drive more safely then I could get married tomorrow and instantly be safer? I think not.

MaisyPops · 30/07/2017 18:07

It's based on statistical risk so I'm not entirely convinced that giving lower premiums to people who are a lower risk is a bad thing.

It's like your premium going up or down based on the risk of your area, or your job.

If married people make fewer claims on their insurance then they are less of a risk in the eyes of insurers. It's not saying they are better drivers, just they are less likely to claim so in the eyes of insurers they are responsible a safer pair for hands.

MaisyPops · 30/07/2017 18:07

*probably a safe pair of hands.

ambm70 · 30/07/2017 18:07

I am now a single parent which means that I consciously drive and behave much more carefully than I may have done before as things would have a much more detrimental affect on my children. All sorts of things, that can change day by day, can have an affect on our driving.

OP posts:
LurkingHusband · 30/07/2017 18:09

I would like to know when these stats were collated

It's an ongoing process undertaken by actuaries. Not impossible to make a mistake, but if they get it wrong, insurers go bust.

ambm70 · 30/07/2017 18:15

The postcode bit would be that you live in an area with more 'high risk' roads or higher expectation of vehicle crime (not that anywhere is immune). I agree with the job question too, there are so many different ways of describing your job title, but i've not yet worked out which is cheaper for me.

OP posts:
araiwa · 30/07/2017 18:20

I think only your name is the only information you give that doesnt change the price. Everythingelse does

LowGravity · 30/07/2017 18:22

. A single person might take more risks as they have no one to think of but themselves.

Nonsense. A quarter of households with children are single parent households, like OP. Believe me when you're a sole parent with no-one else to care for your kids, you drive carefully.

writergirl747474 · 30/07/2017 18:24

I wonder how safe drivers the literally hundreds of women posting on here about cheating husbands are...

I can imagine that when you find out your whole life is a lie you get a little unstable.

amicissimma · 30/07/2017 18:26

This reply has been deleted

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

steff13 · 30/07/2017 18:27

It's all based on numbers. You get lower rates here for getting good grades (if you're under 18) because good students statistically have fewer accidents. Your rates go down at age 21 and again at 25, because, again fewer accidents.

Although, if you've been with the insurer for a while with no claims I'm surprised your marital status makes that much difference.

CrochetBelle · 30/07/2017 18:41

Well its not necessary is it, its just one of many factors. I can certainly imagine that a married person would drive more safely that a single person. For one when you get married you are more likely to have responsibilities which mature you and make you think about another people in your life. A single person might take more risks as they have no one to think of but themselves.

ODFOD. You actually think like that? What a sheltered life you must lead.
When I'm driving, I sure as hell take care when I know I am the sole parent of my two disabled children.
I think having the sense to divorce the asshat should credit me with MORE sensibility, not less!

worridmum · 30/07/2017 18:51

can you imgine the outcry if home insurence was more expesive for women because they on averge have much more expesive and easily stolen things? (aka jewellary yes i know men can have expesive watches etc but women are more likely to have more expesive items on averge)

But that was struck down years and years ago as being sexist but men having to pay more only got banned in 2012......

LurkingHusband · 30/07/2017 18:59

Insurance is based on spreading the risk across a mixed group.

The more accurately you can predict risk the less you're able to spread it in the group.

I have a suspicion that one day, really bad drivers will just simply never be able to hide amongst regular drivers, and will just become uninsurable. Although past experience suggests that they'll just ignore that anyway.

araiwa · 30/07/2017 19:20

Bad drivers do find it difficult to get insured and if they do, it costs a fortune.

Try saying you have a dd10 drunk driving conviction on one of the comparison sites and youll get most companies not offering a price or a huge price. Same if youve had a few accidents that were fault claims

Janeismymiddlename · 30/07/2017 19:31

A single person might take more risks as they have no one to think of but themselves

Fucking hell. There are no single parents then? Single people don't care for siblings, elderly parents, grandparents, friends?

Really?

MaisyPops · 30/07/2017 19:39

It's just statistics, not reason. So it's not 'married people cost insurers less because they [insert imagined reason/behaviour]' it's just 'married people cost insurers less'
This ^^
It's not about married people take more care because...

It's just they don't claim as much so they don't cost the insurers money. Consequently, they are viewed as a safer risk.

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