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AIBU to expect parents not to drink at sports day?!?!
442

KCAREYW1987 · 19/06/2017 15:59

Have just returned from a very hot primary school sports day. A group of parents decided to crack open a few cold cans of pimms at about 11am. AIBU to think that this is totally out of order at a primary school sports day? I mean I know it's not cans of super brew but still I would never dream of watching my little ones in the sack race while getting sloshed in the sun! Would love to hear other opinions on this.

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upperlimit · 20/06/2017 13:35

How do those statistic suggest it is any worse than school cake sales when obesity is on the rise?

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treaclesoda · 20/06/2017 13:39

I enjoy drinking alcohol and I do it regularly (95% of the time it is in moderation, but occasionally it is more than I really should) and even I cringe at the marketing mentioned in that blog. 'Mummy juice' etc and 'if you can read this, bring mummy wine'. I had pause for thought recently when I was doing the supermarket shop and my five year old said 'are you not buying any wine?'. Now, in fairness, he also said 'are you not buying any biscuits?' and I didn't think twice about it, and just said 'no, not today'. But when he said the same thing about the wine I really did have to think about what sort of example I am setting.

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JacquesHammer · 20/06/2017 13:41

It isn't odd to suggest that once you've got to the stage of hiding alcohol in your handbag so you can drink it on the QT at places where you know it won't available or acceptable, then you've got a bit of a problem with knowing where to draw the line

Is that what this is though? Genuinely asking whether it's furtive drinking, or just carrying something in your handbag in this instance?

MrsOverTheRoad that's an anecdote. That's not evidence. In a direct comparable anecdote, I had much the same upbringing as your friend. I barely drink through choice. Sometimes I have the odd one. Neither of those anecdotes can be extrapolated out to be a meaningful statistic

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treaclesoda · 20/06/2017 13:41

The government statistics also say that fewer people are drinking regularly than ten years ago, and the number of people drinking more than 8 units has fallen too. It's not a black and white situation.

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AvoidingCallenetics · 20/06/2017 13:54

MrsOver, life is dangerous. There are people being admitted to hospital because of car accidents, eating too much unhealthy food, not doing enough exercise, even doing too much exercise.
You can't stop people from living as they see fit because you don't approve.

Sugar consumption is a big problem, but plenty of people on this thread have no issue with offering sweet fizzy drinks instead of Pimms.

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Increasinglymiddleaged · 20/06/2017 13:54

How do those statistic suggest it is any worse than school cake sales when obesity is on the rise?

Not to mention fruit juice made from concentrate and that's meant to be 'healthy'......

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Bobbydeniro69 · 20/06/2017 13:54

What an eye opener of a thread.

My DD starts school in September, and I would have never thought in a million years that the school would sell alcohol at an event like a sports day when the kids are involved. Why would they ? it's an event for parents and kids, not an occasion for drinking booze, no matter how little is consumed. Can't an event be held without alcohol having to be available?

I have absolutely no problem with parents having a drink around their own kids in pubs with kids playgrounds etc, but this seems completely unnecessary.

Some of the responses in this thread have a been a bit weird and worrying as well with regards to justifying this practice...for example, you can't really compare alcohol and mince pies, can you?

There are enough opportunities to have a drink in our society, without selling it at bloody school sports days.

Let's have a bit of restraint eh, and try and set kids a good example..sports days are about them.

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SaucyJack · 20/06/2017 13:55

Jacques

The OP posted;

"Funniest thing was someone told the headteacher and he went mad! The group of parents thought we had told on them! Hilarious!"

So yeah- I would say they knew they weren't supposed to be drinking.

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Tomorrowillbeachicken · 20/06/2017 13:55

Yanbu, there's no need to drink at these things, especially if lots will drive home after.

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KCAREYW1987 · 20/06/2017 14:03

Well never did I expect my OP to open such a can of worms!
Some posts have (seriously) gone off the original point. Our school has never had alcohol at events. I never implied that the parents were alcohol dependents just that I was shocked they were drinking them after bringing them in, illegally on school property at 11am at a sports day! I didn't see the need.
I agree that there is a strange relationship with alcohol in this country and the lines are fuzzy. All I can say is the parents in question would of been first to create hell if some of the other parents had been kicking back with some tinnies, but pimms was fine Confused

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Mercime · 20/06/2017 14:08

How do those statistic suggest it is any worse than school cake sales when obesity is on the rise?

That is some seriously skewed thinking.

Just don't drink alcohol when at school! It's totally banned here and hopefully at other primaries. Parents smuggling in Pimms need to take a long hard look at themselves.

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LassWiTheDelicateAir · 20/06/2017 14:10

I completely agree OP. I think you would have to have a very odd relationship with alcohol to make the connection schools sports day at 11 and a can of alcohol.

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JacquesHammer · 20/06/2017 14:13

It's totally banned here and hopefully at other primaries.

Clearly not given a number of us have said so Grin. We don't go in for smuggling though, rather a proper tent with licence.

saucyjack missed that thanks.

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Mercime · 20/06/2017 14:25

We have a bar in the evening once a year at a pta fundraiser. Bringing your own alcohol is banned. And scuzzy.

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upperlimit · 20/06/2017 14:26

Mercime I have never had alcohol at school, I'm far too working class to be trusted with such extravagance. I don't drink alcohol very often, at all, really.

I do think people get carried away with the horrors of other people drinking alcohol though.

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Xmasbaby11 · 20/06/2017 15:02

I wouldn't expect it but nice to have something light like pimms at an afternoon event!

I live in a city and most parents walk their dc to school so drink driving not a concern. Takes me under 10 mins.

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LassWiTheDelicateAir · 20/06/2017 15:02

What an exaggerated response upperlimit

The OP said nothing like as hysterical or classist as you are trying to make out.

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anchor9 · 20/06/2017 15:06

I hate the british attitude to alcohol. some people can't do anything without a drink in their hand. yuck.

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Mercime · 20/06/2017 15:07

I agree. I think it's very depressing.

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upperlimit · 20/06/2017 15:08

What? My school doesn't have Pimms tents or anything. As a pp said, this isn't standard fair at your average school in a working class area.

It's neither hysterical nor exaggerated as a response but maybe a bit tongue in cheek.

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Mercime · 20/06/2017 15:09

A can of Pimms has more alcohol than a can of special brew. But that's OK because it's sunny out Hmm

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LassWiTheDelicateAir · 20/06/2017 15:19

It's neither hysterical nor exaggerated as a response but maybe a bit tongue in cheek.

I was also referring to your comment I do think people get carried away with the horrors of other people drinking alcohol though which is an overreaction to what OP said.

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Lweji · 20/06/2017 15:58

Can't decide which thread is more entertaining. This one or the toddler crying in the tea room.

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JacquesHammer · 20/06/2017 16:16

I hate the british attitude to alcohol. some people can't do anything without a drink in their hand. yuck

It isn't a "british" attitude for me. Its a sensible attitude.

I would far rather my DD see alcohol as something that isn't banned or "cool" or something she needs to rebel to try. I would far rather she sees a Pimms tent for example and sees some people having the odd drink, some people not.

We're going on holiday next week - she might see me have a glass of wine.

I have never been drunk in my life. I have never drunk to even the point of tipsyness. My parents are exactly the same. Ex-H on the otherhand have parents who binged. Who would have grasped their pearls in horror at a drink in an afternoon but who would regularly get drunk to the point of vomitting - Ex-H and his sister would then be shown the "evils of alcohol" - his sister still has a difficult relationship surrounding binging.

Again - pure anecdote, but it certainly helped me develop a healthy relationship with alcohol

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upperlimit · 20/06/2017 16:25

LassWi My post was a response to mercime's request of what people thought of her statistics, that refer to the dangers of drinking alcohol which I said was 'getting carried away' as a response to some parents drinking a little alcohol at sports day.

I don't think the op is over the top though. I can see her point of view.

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