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Normal ageing process
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LiveintheNow · 22/01/2022 09:46

What do you know about getting older? Do you know what to expect in terms of physical abilities declining?

Inspired by expectations on multiple threads about what older people should be doing!

For Example -

"The amount of muscle tissue (muscle mass) and muscle strength tend to decrease beginning around age 30 and continuing throughout life."

https://www.msdmanuals.com/en-gb/home/older-people’s-health-issues/the-aging-body/changes-in-the-body-with-aging

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Letsallscreamatthesistene · 22/01/2022 09:50

Carry on exercising. Dont be sedate. It helps hugely.

As a practice nurse I see the difference between the two and its huge.

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Shapiro · 22/01/2022 09:54

I’m old.

The most important thing for me was to never ever put weight on so for the last decade or more I have consumed considerably less.

I still eat whatever I want but only a small amount of it so that I don’t miss out on the fast but stay slim.

Excess weight when you are older seems to be harder to shift and you don’t want fat stored around your organs or putting a strain on your joints.

I don’t do any hard exercise such as running/jogging as it plays havoc with your face and joints. I prefer long walks that include hills and often walking through sand dunes etc.

Getting enough sleep is vital. I always have a power nap during the day, it is like recharging a battery and makes me feel so much better.

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LiveintheNow · 22/01/2022 09:56

I agree about staying active but I am thinking about things like kidney function that are expected to decline with age.

What is a normal eGFR number?
In adults, the normal eGFR number is more than 90. eGFR declines with age, even in people without kidney disease. See chart below for average estimated eGFR based on age.
Age (years)
Average eGFR
20–29
116
30–39
107
40–49
99
50–59
93
60–69
85
70+
75

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Sheabutterisdelish · 22/01/2022 09:57

Yes keep moving, be it running, housework, gardening, just move !

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LiveintheNow · 22/01/2022 09:57

I see comments like someone in there 80s is as fit as someone in their 30s or 40s and this just isn't possible due to the ageing process.

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PrisonerofZeroCovid · 22/01/2022 09:58

I think one of the issues is that people's experiences of aging differ enormously, and people tend to draw their expectations from those close to them. There is also an element of denial and a bit of "schrodingers old person"- on the one hand people on MN argue that 65 is NOT old, it's middle aged, but at the same time think that it's ridiculous to expect people to work till they're 70.

I feel like successful ageing is a combination of acceptance and mitigation. Keep learning and engaged with society, stay fit, and the rest is luck.

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LiveintheNow · 22/01/2022 09:58

I work with some older people and would say attitude helps a lot but still most people are dealing with bone thinning, muscle degeneration etc

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SoManyTshirts · 22/01/2022 09:58

Like PP I exercise, keep my weight down, try to stay mentally agile. I’d include having new experiences and getting out of your comfort zone, whether that’s a trip to the next county, live music of a different genre, new social settings.

Helps when you have to cope with new situations and changing ability.

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Shapiro · 22/01/2022 09:59

The biggest anti ageing thing for me was to eliminate stress. A lot of that comes naturally when you get older, no more periods which is great.

I’ve always been a confident person but that has increased ten fold now that I’m older.

I make time for myself and that may come across as being selfish sometimes but it works for me.

I don’t have any insecurities now and by focusing on my own health I am much more relaxed and happy which in turn has benefitted my relationship with everyone.

I think when you are older you can choose to have a positive outlook or not and that positively is great for your mental wellbeing which is just as important as your physical state.

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PrisonerofZeroCovid · 22/01/2022 10:00

I see comments like someone in there 80s is as fit as someone in their 30s or 40s and this just isn't possible due to the ageing process.

Yes, there may be some 80 year olds with better fitness than some 20 years olds, but it would be extreme in both cases. Anecdote vs data.

I am in my late 40's. I can actually bench/ deadlift more now than in my 20's but that's purely training volume. If I'd trained like I do now in my 20's I'd have kicked my 40+ arse.

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Mischance · 22/01/2022 10:02

I would exercise if it were possible - just moving around at all in the mornings hurts like hell.

The important thing is to accept the process and bash on as best you can. Stay involved and keep smiling!

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LiveintheNow · 22/01/2022 10:08

PrisonerofZeroCovid

Yes I think that is right, anecdote versus data. I think a lot of people are unaware of the data. I know in my 20s I thought life would be the same at 60 as 30. I did not consider ageing at all.

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LunaTheCat · 22/01/2022 10:15

I think for me - now aged 57

  • keep leaning new thinks - playing an instrument for me
    -try to exercise - I can’t run any more but yoga, walking, swimming
  • I have unfortunately gained weight in last couple yrs - been to GP for help. Evidence is though carrying a bit more weight may be better as you are ( 5 kilos more not 25 😉)
  • have your BP checked know your cholesterol and lipids, know your HbA1C ( sugars)
    -take care of your skin - SPF 30 plus, big hat.
    -don’t become a grumpy old fart! Take interest in new people. Have a group friends of many ages - older and younger
  • Depp up with technology - without it you are lost in this new world!
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EarringsandLipstick · 22/01/2022 10:19

I don’t do any hard exercise such as running/jogging as it plays havoc with your face and joints.

This isn't true. If you don't train properly or wear the wrong footwear you can damage joints.

In actuality running will strengthen your joints if done properly, and in conjunction with other weight bearing exercise.

It's also a myth about it affecting your face. Anyone exercising (including walking) outside should wear sunscreen. The act of running does not affect people's faces.

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pastaparadise · 22/01/2022 10:21

Liveinthenow - are you a nurse/ medic? You seem to have a pretty dire view of aging? I'm guessing you also see a biased sample of iller older people if you work in health?

What do the kidney function figures mean? Is it a statistical difference or noticeable? I can tell I would be a lot more hungover and would never try to drink now at 45 what I would have at 21, but how else would this manifest?

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crackofdoom · 22/01/2022 10:22

What happens to your eyesight after 40 has definitely been a shock to me. I’ve always been shortsighted, and genuinely had no idea that you can be long sighted at the same time too! 😱

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EarringsandLipstick · 22/01/2022 10:23

@LiveintheNow

Clearly ageing is a thing. However it is absolutely possible to be fit & active in your 60s, 70s and beyond. The limiting affects of ageing - loss of bone density, weight gain - can of course been mitigated. Unfortunately we can't prevent certain illnesses, and some will be luckier than others. But we can keep ourselves optimally healthy as much as we can.

I spoke to a man I know at my exercise class this morning. He is just about to turn 70. He's incredibly fit. He told me he was very fit till 32, then did nothing for over 30 years due to work pressures, and was very unfit. He started again close to retirement & is in incredible shape.

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BoozeSuitcase · 22/01/2022 10:26

I think we underestimate how sedentary middle age and later can be. Children and young people naturally run and move, dance etc. Exercise massively helps keep muscles strong and therefore joints. We do need to plan and project manage our health. Ageing is inevitable, but quality of life can be improved significantly by nutrition, exercise and being actively curious about life.

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crosbystillsandmash · 22/01/2022 10:31

@LiveintheNow

I see comments like someone in there 80s is as fit as someone in their 30s or 40s and this just isn't possible due to the ageing process.

I disagree, I'm 50 and have remained slim and very active (I appreciate I'm not 80!)
Some of dd's friends are shockingly unfit, lethargic, inactive and with half the energy I have.
Yes, my organs are older etc but I think someone who is older and in good health is ageing pretty well!
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PrisonerofZeroCovid · 22/01/2022 10:34

I disagree, I'm 50 and have remained slim and very active (I appreciate I'm not 80!) Some of dd's friends are shockingly unfit, lethargic, inactive and with half the energy I have.

But you're comparing two different people, not the same person across their lifespan . I imagine your 70 year old fit guy couldn't beat his 30 year old self's lap time. They have "good for age" categories for a reason. If old people had the physical potential of young people, we'd see more older professional sportsmen and women. As it is, there are very few.

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astorsback · 22/01/2022 10:43

I think stretching daily is of huge benefit, as is some form of weight training to build and maintain muscle mass.

Look after your eyesight. Things become more difficult to see, both close to and in low light once past 40.

Keep up to date with technology. Not just phones but TVs, cars, audio/visual equipment, apps, on-line services (banking/investing/tax included).Dont be one of those people left behind thinking it's just a fad.

Try to keep working, even if just part time or volunteering.

Read the news from a range of outlets.

Keep up with or return to your interests and hobbies.

Keep learning. Future Learn/Udemy/University of the 3rd Age/Duo Lingo etc..

Eat well, little and often. Use supplements.

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PrisonerofZeroCovid · 22/01/2022 10:55

Keep up to date with technology.

I think this is really important- so many people in late 50's/60's see being a luddite as a badge of honour. They don't seem to realise that a lot of workarounds/ older services will die out eventually, or that the newer ones have significant benefits (2 factor authentication etc). Plus get a smartphone and get free international phone calls. No brainer.

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peaceanddove · 22/01/2022 11:07

I look to my aunt as inspiration. Back in the 60s she was a model so was already genetically blessed. She's now in her mid 70s and does some form of exercise every single day e.g. swimming, yoga, Pilates etc. Her rambling group meet twice a week and they easily walk 12 miles.

When we're out shopping, my aunt easily keeps up walking with me and my teen DDs. In contrast, my friend who is only 56 can't keep up and needs several little rests.

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Evenstar · 22/01/2022 11:18

I think that if you have good health and no long term conditions, then it is easy to overlook what an advantage that is in terms of maintaining your fitness. I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia last year, and although it seems likely I have had it for around 20 years and managed well for a long time, it is catching up with me as I near 60. I walk every day, take supplements and eat well, but it is definitely affecting my ability to do things now I am getting older as well.

If you have chronic pain and/or fatigue for whatever reason you are at a disadvantage as you get older.

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LiveintheNow · 22/01/2022 11:48

I work more in social care than health and see a lot of older people (50 plus is considered older by the way!) with differing levels of health and fitness. Attitude makes a difference too but what I am getting at is you can eat well, be active, keep engaged socially, be lucky enough not to have any health conditions etc but there is an underlying process that for some reason we mostly ignore.

Eyesight is a good example. I had great eyesight, optician told me I would not need glasses until I was in my 40s when people often begin to need reading glasses. Being young I didn't think about that much as is was so far in the future... so now needing reading glasses and glasses for distance is a bit if a shock and due to age alone.

Kidney function declines with age, the result would be getting tired more easily, less energy, lower alcohol tolerance.

There can be older people who are fitter than younger people but in general muscle decline starts in your 30s!

It is use it or lose I guess to some extent but there are some things you can't do a thing about.

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