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Any ‘proper’ jewellers around?

38 replies

Costacoffeeplease · 21/10/2020 18:16

If an item was valued at £600 in 1986, is there any way of estimating its current value?

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Costacoffeeplease · 22/10/2020 12:44

Bump

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ginsparkles · 22/10/2020 12:46

It would depend on the item. You would need to take it to get a valuation done it it. If you have the old one take it with you. (I work in an independent jewellers)

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DigOutThoseLemonHandWipes · 22/10/2020 12:50

It depends what it is! If the value is in the metal then you could work it out (e.g. if its a solid gold chain/bangle etc) but if the value exceeded the price of the metal and/or stones then it could have risen in value but it could also have gone down if it is something that has gone out of fashion or become less collectable. The best thing would be to get a current valuation.

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ThistleWitch · 22/10/2020 12:50

depends on what it is made from, and if the designer is still well known and sought after - are you able to post a picture?

for a purely finance point of view - £6,000 in 1986 would be the equivalent of £12,292.30

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ThistleWitch · 22/10/2020 12:50

oops £600, makes £1,229.23

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furrypesto · 22/10/2020 12:58

As the others said there are many variables to take into account which only an expert can assess.

Is it hallmarked? If it is hallmarked you should be able to know the metal (if gold what carat etc) and also who the maker was.

Has it got stones? You would need to know what stones and the quality of the stones. Not all diamonds are equal. It depends on the cut, colour, carat, clarity (the 4 cs!).

As a pp said, certain makers/jewellers/designers will be more collectable than others and will then add to or detract from your last valuation.

In short no one can value it here and you need to take it to an expert.

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TrollTheRespawnJeremy · 22/10/2020 12:59

What’s the item. Also is it a valuation for scrap or replacement/insurance? As you will get a vastly different price there.

-A Jeweller.

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Viviennemary · 22/10/2020 13:02

Small jewellers do a valuation for around £15. That wàs around 10 years ago so price might have gone up. A few don't charge. Prices of some items have gone up and others down so nobody could say unless they saw at least a photo.

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user1497510803 · 22/10/2020 13:24

I would also add , it depends on the ' sellabillity ' of the item. What was in fashion in 1986 , might not be commercial now. That stands for antique pieces as well .

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PigletJohn · 22/10/2020 14:11

Jewellery has two values. "Prices" might be a better word.

One is what you would get if you sold it, and one is what it would cost you to buy a replacement.

The Insurance value is usually the second, which may well be ten times as much as the first.

If it is solid metal, there will also be a scrap value.

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anuffername · 22/10/2020 15:18

No, "proper" jewellers don't exisit anymore.

Much better to ask a load of randoms on MN to make a guess.

Make sure you don't actually specify what the item is though.

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Blobby10 · 22/10/2020 15:29

We have a proper independent jeweller in our town and I recently had 6 items of jewellery valued - he did a proper description of each one and printed it off for me for insurance. Cost £50 for the whole lot.

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Costacoffeeplease · 22/10/2020 15:50

I’m not in the U.K. and proper jewellers are thin on the ground here

It’s 18 carat gold with a single diamond, quite old as it belonged to my grandfather. He had it valued for insurance purposes in 1986 and I have their valuation

I was just asking an idle question, no need for the snark, but thanks to those who have been helpful and not stated the bloody obvious

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anuffername · 22/10/2020 16:43

I’m not in the U.K. and proper jewellers are thin on the ground here

That might have been a helpful bit of information to have included then!

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Redlocks28 · 22/10/2020 16:45

I’d say resale value it depends on how pretty it is. If it’s old fashioned, it won’t get much.

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AriettyHomily · 22/10/2020 16:47

Depends on so many days factors. Heavy weight gold, decent diamond? Old fashioned you'd get melt down plus the stone value

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PigletJohn · 22/10/2020 19:04

pure gold Current World Price is $1,904.18 per Troy oz.
18ct is 75% gold
traders will have their own costs and profit out of that
and a ring is not very heavy.
So sadly, scrap jewellery may not fetch much.

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Costacoffeeplease · 22/10/2020 19:17

I don’t know why, it doesn’t affect the value where I live 🤷‍♀️

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TrollTheRespawnJeremy · 23/10/2020 13:55

Hey OP- it depends on your insurance policy. Whether you're planning on a like for like or new for old policy.

New for old is usually the only cost-effective way to go if it's a one-off unique piece. The jeweller would be giving you the cost to create a replica of the ring- would need to know how many points are in your diamond, weight of the gold, whether there's engraving, what type of setting etc to factor in the cost of all the work.

Having been in business since the 80s- your valuation will have increased. But without the item in hand it's impossible to say how much by.

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TrollTheRespawnJeremy · 23/10/2020 13:57

Where you live will factor into your valuation a bit as stone setters in, say, Dubai get paid absolute buttons compared to those in Hatton Garden. Your valuation will be based on what it costs to replace your item in the country you live in with the resources available to them.

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Costacoffeeplease · 23/10/2020 16:19

No, if I wanted it replaced I’d go to the U.K. for it. It’s a man’s signet ring with a reasonable size diamond, no idea of carat/cut/clarity but it looks fine to my untrained eye 😊

Any ‘proper’ jewellers around?
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TrollTheRespawnJeremy · 23/10/2020 16:49

It looks like a rose cut diamond which can be a pain to replace as expensive. £600 is way off OP- I'm going off a picture so it could be massively misleading but I think it would be at least double that.

If you can find a jeweller to do it where you are I'd get it done sooner rather than later to be on the safe side. Definitely make sure you've got it insured.

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Costacoffeeplease · 23/10/2020 16:56

Ok thank you, that’s very helpful. Any idea of its age?

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Elieza · 23/10/2020 17:08

The age will be in the hallmark. Get a good magnifying glass and look at the pictures stained in the hallmark to identify which assay office it was stamped by and what year.

Your phone may even be able to zoom in close and take a photo which you can then enlarge to see the details of the hallmark.

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Costacoffeeplease · 23/10/2020 17:11

Thanks will give it a try

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