Any experiences of InterHigh please?

(24 Posts)
hiddenhome2 Tue 02-Feb-16 20:52:20

I've read some past threads, but would like to chat about this system.

Ds2 isn't coping well in Year 6 and is being assessed for Aspergers soon.

We're looking at different methods of education for him and someone on MN mentioned InterHigh. I've taken a look at their website and it looks interesting.

I just have a few questions - do you need to sit with the pupil during their lesson?

Is it done via Skype?

Are there opportunities for making online friends with the other pupils?

Can you still join a home ed support group in your area to get info and support/social opportunities whatever?

Just any thoughts/experiences would be appreciated.

Saracen Wed 03-Feb-16 08:07:36

I haven't used any online programme so I can only answer one of your questions: yes, of course you can still join a local support group! People won't mind what method you are using to educate your child. There are all sorts of approaches used by HE families, including online schools. The only possible difficulty is that some online schools require the child to be online at certain times of day, and that may clash with home ed get-togethers. But you will probably find some that you can attend.

Good luck, I hope you find the right method for your son.

hiddenhome2 Wed 03-Feb-16 10:31:18

Thank you. The lessons are from 09:30 - 12:00 apparently.

QueenCarpetJewels Mon 08-Feb-16 16:38:17

My DD has been learning via InterHigh for about 3 years now (secondary & 6th form).

To answer your questions so far:

-Yes there are opportunities for making friends with classmates

-Yes you can still join a home ed group, as you are still home edding smile

-No you don't have to sit with the child while they're in a lesson.

-No it's not done via Skype.
InterHigh uses 'Blackboard' software that they get you to download and the classes run through that (see image, I got my DD to screenshot it for you). All new pupils get an induction session with the Principal beforehand to learn how to use it. The teacher can't see the pupil, the pupil can't see the teacher, and the pupils can't see each other. But the use of a headset is required, so each others' voices can be heard (only one person can talk on the mic at a time, so it's not a cacophony of voices like you might get in a traditional classroom sometimes!) If a student is disrupting the class, they can be 'removed' and put into a private classroom with the teacher. All lessons are recorded and available to watch or listen to again afterwards. The teachers, like the students, access the lessons from home (or sometimes from InterHigh HQ). Admin staff come into the lesson to take the register.

LineyReborn Tue 01-Mar-16 10:28:15

What are the fees, if you don't mind me asking?

LambethWalk Wed 02-Mar-16 20:54:47

Hi

My son is in Year 9 at Interhigh. The fees are £2520 a year, payable by term or monthly. It goes up in Year 10. www.interhigh.co.uk/fees/

LineyReborn Thu 03-Mar-16 07:21:10

Thanks, Lambeth. That's really helpful for a family I know. I did look at the website but couldn't find the fees bit for some reason.

ridingabike Mon 21-Mar-16 16:59:59

the pupil can't see the teacher

This seems really weird to me. So what can they see? It seems a bit weird to have a lesson with a disembodied voice. I take part in online courses and you can generally see the teacher or presenter talking for at least some of it, the rest of the time the action might focus on slides etc. I have thought of Interhigh for ds but am a bit worried since I read this on this forum.

Phaedra11 Fri 01-Apr-16 11:03:43

ridingabike

DS2 at InterHigh (year 10) and that was something I was initially disappointed about but it doesn't seem to be an issue generally. DS is completely used to communicating verbally or through a text box at school. The only time I thought it might be an issue was when DS had a weak teacher who spoke with a boring monotone. The other teachers have all been fine though, and he no longer has that teacher.

dailyfailureismyname Thu 28-Apr-16 07:25:49

What about the standard of Interhigh? Would it be on par with an average school?

dailyfailureismyname Thu 28-Apr-16 07:29:38

Also regarding exams, do you have to organize your own exam centre, or do they do that? I know for us MFL's are sadly out of the question as our centre do not facilitate the orals and none of the schools that I have tried accept external candidates.

nennyrainbow Fri 29-Apr-16 22:24:42

Just place marking as I am in a similar situation. DS1 in year 6, on waiting list for ASD assessment, and won't cope in mainstream secondary, so booked into interhigh from this September.

G1raffe Fri 29-Apr-16 22:30:02

They only do a few subjects don't they?

dolkapots Sat 30-Apr-16 00:32:51

They do 8 core subjects and an extra 5 or so, that are charged at £400 per subject.

G1raffe Sat 30-Apr-16 07:03:24

Ah I thought it was less when I last looked!

G1raffe Sat 30-Apr-16 07:16:18

Just had a look and you're right (obviously!) it was one of the things that ruled it out in my mind. I see they've got a 6th form noe too.

I see from their site they don't consider it homeschooling as such as they see it as a school with core hours of 9-12/1 with some work to do at home each day. It does look a good set up.

I'd miss some of the physical interaction and be be sure id want them at a computer screen 3 hours a day but in real life I guess people in offices are etc and in our case we'd make sure we'd play in the afternoons. Presumably we couldn't access home ed groups though as they often want flexibility or whole day trips (it seems. We're still schooling currently.)

fixstupid Thu 07-Jul-16 21:27:38

Blog post that may help a bit. There are several online schools now, all with their own ethos and approach & with slightly different subject offerings. I think it's well worth phoning them & getting a "feel" for them. Interhigh is the best known, but your child might suit a smaller of more flexible set up. Some offer a months trial, others want you to sign up for a full term and give a terms notice. It does vary quite a bit.

cymrualn.blogspot.co.uk/2016/03/learning-online-live-online-schools.html

TigerBreadAddict Tue 12-Jul-16 10:04:49

Can I ask, do people using Interhigh find they need to be with their kids during the school day, or does anyone employ a tutor or sitter type person? Or do they do ok left to get on with it given that they are virually interacting with others. Just wondering how it fits into family life where parents work out of the home for some/all of the week.

user1475055956 Wed 28-Sep-16 11:19:49

As a parent, you don't need to sit with your child while they are completing Interhigh lessons; they are able to ask the teacher questions if they get stuck or they can ask one of the other children. The classes are small so there is scope for good support. But in terms of not being around at all, it probably depends on the age and motivation level of your child. My son started with Interhigh a few weeks ago and so far I'm very impressed. It's excellent and works just as they say it does. He's really enjoying his lessons. There is maybe 30 - 60 minutes of homework every day too. My son is 13 and doesn't need me to sit with him while he completes lessons, but does find it helpful for me to be around at times - e.g. if our connection drops out, getting back online quickly, or if there is something he's not sure about. Also, you need to consider if your child will remember to sign into lessons at the right time? I'm pretty sure my son wouldn't do so if I didn't remind him. (I work at home.) Interhigh provide a page for parents so that they can see if their child has missed any lessons, etc., so you can keep track of participation if you're not around all the time. There is also a lesson library so children can review any lessons they have missed or that they just want to go over again.

Ineedmorepatience Sat 15-Oct-16 17:22:35

Just out of interest is there any flexibility with joining in with lessons?

Eg if your chid prefers to do lesson at a different time?

I am looking at options for my demand avoidant teen with asd and anxiety!

She is academically able but is better at setting her own schedules.

TIA smile

user1471537877 Sat 15-Oct-16 17:32:38

Hi in need

It is very much timetabled, that said my demand avoidant ASD teen girl copes as it's broken up into chunks so 9.30-10.30 10.45-11.45 one day and afternoon free, another day break between lessons 10.30-11.30

It's rare to do a full day of lessons

Ineedmorepatience Sat 15-Oct-16 19:53:08

Thanks I am exploring our options at the moment.

I dont know if she would be able to cope with me telling her that she needs to be online at a particular time!

We will see smile

KeepOnKeepingOn1 Tue 25-Oct-16 07:48:34

Ineed - DS2 has just started at Cambridge Home School. He is 10 and would be in year 6 but is following the KS3 curriculum. 11 subjects! So far he much prefers it and there is no problem getting him to the live lessons. He would never do homework after a full day at school and weekends were not for schoolwork in his mind. Now that all work is homework there is much less of a problem - he equally accepts doing homework outside of live lessons.

He is demand avoidant in a passive resistance sort of way so ATM I sit with him to provide 1:1 and keep him on task. The lessons can be attended live or the recording can be viewed at a different time. They use slightly different web based software which includes a box where the pupils can see the teacher.

The school can be named on an EHCP and LA's pay fees (when forced). The new SENCOP allows for SEN HE which is not elective in the usual sense.

KeepOnKeepingOn1 Tue 25-Oct-16 07:49:47

Ineed - DS2 has just started at Cambridge Home School. He is 10 and would be in year 6 but is following the KS3 curriculum. 11 subjects! So far he much prefers it and there is no problem getting him to the live lessons. He would never do homework after a full day at school and weekends were not for schoolwork in his mind. Now that all work is homework there is much less of a problem - he equally accepts doing homework outside of live lessons.

He is demand avoidant in a passive resistance sort of way so ATM I sit with him to provide 1:1 and keep him on task. The lessons can be attended live or the recording can be viewed at a different time. They use slightly different web based software which includes a box where the pupils can see the teacher.

The school can be named on an EHCP and LA's pay fees (when forced). The new SENCOP allows for SEN HE which is not elective in the usual sense.

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