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Grazing Masks - have you used one?
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frostyfingers · 31/05/2010 16:27

I have a grazing mask which I've tried on my pony (he looks like Hannibal Lecter) with it on, but he manages to wriggle enough of his nose out of it to eat as much grass as if he weren't wearing it at all. I can't get it any tighter without hurting him, and was wondering if any of you had ever used one successfully - and how.

I like the idea of letting him out to graze more, but it doesn't look like it'll work well enough. He currently spends half his time in a bare yard, and the remainder on a bald patch of tufty grass, and yet still looks like a round rubber ball!

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Saggyoldclothcatpuss · 02/06/2010 01:10

I have tried a grazing mask, and found that the pony ended up with sore chafed patches. The one you are using sounds like the flat green one which attaches to the head collar? greenguard possibly? Mine was a bucket style one, but I cant imagine the flat one wouldnt chafe, noses are very sensitive. Libbys do a soft webbing muzzle which unlike mine doesnt have any hard bits in, but I havent tried it.
My friend, who is my horse GOD, when I asked her, said that the only good way to get a horse to lose weight is exercise exercise exercise. I suppose this makes sense, I dont lose any weight when I stand about all day! But, she also said, that she has read an article recently, that says that losing weight too fast can flood the body with the toxins stored in the fat, causing the pony to come down with laminitis even though the fat is coming off. So exercise needs to be sensible, and build up, not full on straight away.
I also have a spherical shetland, and I am trying to take her out for a walk a little further every day. You can also try cutting his hay with straw, it gives them bulk, to keep their digestion going, but no nutritional benefit. And obvoiusly, if he is overweight, he wont need any hard feed.

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frostyfingers · 02/06/2010 11:09

Thank you - I thought it would be too simple. Luckily he doesn't get laminitis, and to be fair he is very broad naturally, but although he's kept in and grazed on a starvation patch I was hoping I could give him more time out with his friend but it doesn't look like it's going to be possible.

He comes out when I walk my dogs, most days, and does get ridden in the holidays but even then doesn't really lose much weight. In fact the only time he does is when he goes hunting as he gets so excited by it all!

He's impossible to lunge as he does "join up" with you - just keeps turning in towards me and won't go round and round!

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Saggyoldclothcatpuss · 02/06/2010 11:12

How big is he? Can you ride him?

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frostyfingers · 02/06/2010 11:19

He's 12.2 and quite strong enough. It has to be bareback though as the saddle that fits him does not fit me! It's like sitting on a greasy pole, and his walk is so choppy compared to what I'm used to I almost get seasick!

I have ridden him quite a few times, and have had some strange looks from people as obviously I'm way too long in the leg for him!

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Saggyoldclothcatpuss · 02/06/2010 11:31

Bugger what people think, get a cheap felt pad and get going! I had a 12.3 new forest for years. I've not got long legs, but I'm not exactly skinny. The horse never minded, why should anyone else! Have to say though, riding a pony is a different experience, very bouncy and none of this and up, and down when trotting, more updownupdownupdown! you get used to it though!

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