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Tell me your top pony tips please !
21

CMOTdibbler · 07/01/2011 10:57

Pony is happy enough with unlimited grazing, turned out 24/7, and haynet twice a day. He has a medium rug on (is v v cold in their field, the wind whips across, plus it keeps more of him clean). Gets lunged most days (by yard owner), plus I'm working with him in hand (just walking round over/round things and seeing bikes/skateboards etc which he's not been exposed to before) so he's getting used to all the things going on around him.

But is there anything I'm missing ? Any winter grooming tips, supplements to use, or anything else useful for the first time pony owner ?

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marge2 · 07/01/2011 12:29

Keep checking and picking out his feet and watch his heels for mud fever! Otherwise if he is living out don't bother with trying to keep him too clean. Just get the very worst of mud off under tack areas or if it is rubbing under rugs with a quick dandy brush or rubber/ plastic curry comb rub. He needs the natural coat greases to stay waterproof and warm.

I know it seems a long way off, but when the time comes watch out for the spring grass!! Don't let him get fat. (bitter experience of laminitis here!!)

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Butkin · 07/01/2011 16:15

Just watch that he doesn't lose too much weight though if out 24/7. We are feeding ours a scoop of Dodson and Horrell Safe and Sound with some sugar beet each evening which is designed to keep their weight without taking any risks with laminitis etc.

I don't know the details of your pony although presumably a young pony that you're not riding yet. We've just got our back into walking work - roads and tracks - as we steadily begin to build them up.

Don't forget to check on your worming regime - we're about to give ours Panacur Guard.

Also make sure that their water supply is not freezing - that has been a big problem for us this Winter.

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LovePinkBitsOfMyHorse · 07/01/2011 16:33

tail thing, I forget what they are called - wash, condition, detangle and plait the tail into them and fold in half and Velcro through plait to hold in place. They're designed for field use and stay put really well, not in summer obviously

(getting fed up with muddy dreads where tails used to be)

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CMOTdibbler · 07/01/2011 20:41

Thanks all - worming and water is ok (is wormed with all the rest, and water is done twice daily at least)

He is just coming into ridden work, but is 4, so ds (who is also 4) hasn't ridden him yet but yo thinks it'll only be another week as he has been fine with others and on the lunge. He came straight from the stud, so just wasn't as used to lots of children running round/dogs and all that stuff.

Have just been combating the worst of the mud (how do they get it in their ears fgs ?)

Think I am just a bit overwhelmed with the choice of supplements/feeds/creams - its hard to know what is needed really. Don't want to make any mistakes or waste money either

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shufflebum · 08/01/2011 16:34

There are lots of supplements on the market and you probably don't need any of them! You might just want to consider a basic vit and min supplement as the grass won't be too nutritious at the moment. You will then need to feed a little bit of chaff something like Dengie Hifi light to get it in him. Otherwise you can get mineral licks that you can leave out in the field called Rockies but my mare would never use them.
A tail detangler is a good mud deterent if you spray it on the legs as well as the tail. Obviously avoid any areas where tack goes as it will make it slippery.
Basically ignore most of the stuff around, you don't need it!

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ManateeEquineOhara · 08/01/2011 17:26

There is hardly anything you would need for a healthy, grass kept, 4yo pony. :)

The best advice if you are new to this is to take advice, which you are doing obviously, but we have some new-to-horses people at our yard who get all defensive when they get given advice or when someone suggests they are wrong (generally related to their interpretation of the horses behaviour), not the best approach in terms of what is best for their horses.

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Saggyoldclothcatpuss · 08/01/2011 20:57

Watch that weight! I'm callous I know, but my shetand and welsh a are living out rugless, (not in work, a is pregnant) and only get hay or feed If they cant see the grass for snow. They have a salt/vit lick. Neither are in any way skinny! (Shetland is recovering from laminitis) I've said it before on here, but I like them to go into spring on the lighter side of good condition (not skinny, just not fat) so there is somewhere for the grass fat to go! Natives are Very hardy!

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Loshad · 08/01/2011 22:39

so true saggy, i'm hoping for my shetland to lose a little more condition in the next couple of months - not loads but just enough to ease the transistion into spring - the TB on the other hand....

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Pixel · 09/01/2011 00:08

Couldn't agree more, we'll be aiming for slightly leaner horses before the grass starts to grow. There is a pony at our place that is obese now, I've never seen such an enormous solid crest. He's going to be in real trouble come the spring.

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Saggyoldclothcatpuss · 09/01/2011 00:10

The trouble I have is that my shitland will break out when the grass starts to get low. She is a total git, and uses her exceptionally thick mane as an insulator against the electric fence. I have to use 3 strands of tape and a huge battery to even stand a chance. At one point she had electric tape adorning her headcollar as a deterrent! I can't resort to a muzzle as she has an underbite and wouldn't be able to eat. She drives me barking mad!

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Pixel · 09/01/2011 01:26

Yes, our shetland has got through the electric a few times recently. The other day I found the little madam in next-door's field. We will be upping her security when the grass starts growning, three strands at least!

I had to laugh the other day when I saw my friend's electric fencing. She has two little terrors ponies and a big cob who has been busting through the fence recently, closely followed by his partners in crime. Determined to foil them she has bought the tallest plastic canes she could get, put tape through every slot (7 strands), and pulled the whole lot tight by fixing it to solid wooden fence posts at the ends. If they run at it I think they will bounce straight off and end up back at the bottom of the field before they know what has hit them. Grin

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LovePinkBitsOfMyHorse · 09/01/2011 17:03

I am not pleased to be associated with him but do know a certain brown horse who jumped not only the electric fence but an actual (short) person too. Dangerous yet impressive free-schooling.

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shufflebum · 09/01/2011 18:04

My mare regularly jumps into whichever field she feels like particularly if the grass is not long enough in hers. I keep trying to tell her a) she's fat b) I won't let her starve and c) the most important thing, she's 25 and jumping 3ft 9in electric fences is a little too thrill seeking for my liking these days

I have to say though if a week passes where she doesn't do it I worry and think she might be about to drop dead on me!

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Saggyoldclothcatpuss · 09/01/2011 19:14

[email protected] pixels friend! That fence sounds fantastic! Bet my little shit sweetie could still get through! She scares the bejesus out of me. I'm only there twice a day tops and I get scared she will get tangled! I've got my battery on charge tonight and she is spending the day in her electric tape wrapped headcollar tomorrow as I'm off work and can spy on her!

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CMOTdibbler · 09/01/2011 19:35

Am def watching his weight - will buy a weight band to make sure its not just my eye on him.

Getting lots of advice in rl - it's just that YO is def a 'grass and a bit of hay is all they need' person, and the owners of the other two ponies in his field are rather more high maintenance which makes it tricky.

He is such a lovey though ! Lots of snogs for ds and me

And in a super bright spot, I've found someone who will help me to sort out riding one handed, so will be back on myself Grin

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JRsandCoffee · 11/01/2011 18:21

Ultimate winter grooming tip is Pig Oil......it's a white clear oil, much better than baby oil which I think is a pointless endeavour for anything other than babies and prettying the eyes and nose for showing (if like me you're a luddite and think that showing make up is the work of satan).

It comes from Scats or similar store and is a must if the equine in your life remotely falls into the hairy category. Spray it on feathers, undercarriage and tail, brush it through a bit and new mud just fails to stick and any existing mud sort of bobbles and falls off - genius. Don't spray it on manes or saddle areas as it could make everything slippy but otherwise mine ticks along on a weekly application. I also tend to spray him on grass or gravel so that if I miss fire it doesn't go on the concrete and make a slidey patch.

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JRsandCoffee · 11/01/2011 18:28

Ooooh and re the riding one handed (not sure why).... stick your reins round your feet while you're watching TV etc and get used to the feel of having all in one hand, how you might shorten etc - good also if getting used to double reins.

Forgot to say that Pig Oil is a fraction of the price of any other product alleged to do the same! And will second all those who say don't worry about all the other things we have pressed upon us by advertisers etc at this stage in his life he should be fine, he sounds very well looked after. If you do suspect the dreaded laminitis at any time NAF Laminaze is good...

Shutting up now!

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CMOTdibbler · 11/01/2011 19:09

I've already ordered pig oil, and am planning a good session with it on Saturday as ds is going off after his lesson to play.

I lost most of the use of my left hand in a riding accident in August Sad, so have to relearn

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JRsandCoffee · 11/01/2011 19:13

Sorry, didn't pick up that the pig oil had already been mentioned - duh! Bad luck re the hand, poor you, hope all goes well with the re-learning!

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CMOTdibbler · 11/01/2011 19:42

Actually, no one had mentioned pig oil on this thread, I remembered it from advice on keeping the feathery feet of the share horse I had white and mud free

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JRsandCoffee · 11/01/2011 20:12

Tis genius is it not? I can't believe I ever lived without it Smile

trots off glad not to be guilty of not reading the bloody thread!

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