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Working in a SEMH school
6

BoldMcCoo · 16/12/2017 09:45

I've got a new job and I'm so nervous! I've never been in a SEMH school before and I can barely sleep with nerves.

I'm support staff and I've done the same role before, but in a primary school- new school is secondary. Don't want to out myself by saying the exact job role but it's working with the kids (not teaching) and their parents/caregivers.

Any tips/advice/resources really appreciated.

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sausagesandwiches · 16/12/2017 10:27

Make sure you make time for self care -you cannot help the children if you are not in a good place and you will be challenged by some of the children's stories

Treat every child as an individual -most SEMH schools will have behaviour policies but a good chunk of children that have individual behaviour plans as they need different support

Remember you are working with teenagers -being a teenager is stressful enough without being 'different' -respect the age and treat them appropriately

Think about ASD -diagnosed and undiagnosed, especially girls
It will be very common

Forgive quickly and easily -you have to be able to move on and work in the moment

And finally -enjoy it
Enjoy the little things, the laughter, the ideas, the progress, the relationships you build, the difference you can make to the child and the family

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Lowdoorinthewal1 · 16/12/2017 17:30

I absolutely loved the SEMH school I worked in.

Agree with sausage you need to make sure you have an outlet for any tension you take home. Maybe a healthier one than drinking a bottle of wine every night!!

Hone in on the most successful members of staff and model from their behaviour- look at everything, body language/ tone of voice/ communication style. This is the best way to learn what works in your particular school.

Don't take thinking personally when things go wrong, but when they do go wrong walk away thinking 'how will I approach that tomorrow so it goes better'. The only person's behaviour you can actually control is your own.

Enjoy!

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BoldMcCoo · 17/12/2017 18:53

Thank you both, your input is really appreciated!

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BoldMcCoo · 20/12/2017 23:18

bumping for any other replies :)

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Blueemeraldagain · 21/12/2017 14:27

I teach in an SEMH school. My best tip is look happy to see the students, say hello/good morning/whatever every time you see them in the corridor. Whatever works for you but acknowledge them. These students generally have few people who are ever happy to see them.

Be genuine. The students will smell any bullshit a mile away.

You will have hard, shockingly hard, days. It will improve. At my school there is a noteable difference in how students respond to new staff members after a term and a school holiday. I think coming back after a term and break reassures the students that the staff member is worth letting in?

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Devilishpyjamas · 21/12/2017 14:35

Don’t take anything personally. Let go of your ego. Be reflective about how you may have contributed when things go wrong, but be compassionate towards yourself as well. You will make mistake and contribute to incidents - that’s just the way it is. Learn from mistakes but don’t beat yourself up about them.

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