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Style & Beauty

Yuka app - I wish I hadn't found it (only slightly joking!)

11 replies

AbbyGal · 18/03/2023 17:30

It scans the barcodes of health and beauty items and then shows which chemicals etc are in them and how harmful they are.

I'm shocked at some products which I thought were ok, really are not.

Useful information but I've a feeling it's going to cost me to replace things!

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Youvebeenseeingsos · 18/03/2023 19:11

I was shocked too.
It doesn’t suggest an alternative you could use instead though, which would be really handy, although I do understand why they don’t.
I actually stopped using it, it seemed like everything was bad!

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Haver74 · 18/03/2023 21:58

There is nothing harmful in beauty products. This is "clean" beauty nonsense!

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AbbyGal · 19/03/2023 10:50

Haver74 · 18/03/2023 21:58

There is nothing harmful in beauty products. This is "clean" beauty nonsense!

Can I ask why you say that? The picture is,a screenshot of a chemical that is in Olaplex conditioner - doesn't look good to me?

Yuka app - I wish I hadn't found it (only slightly joking!)
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Squiblet · 19/03/2023 11:03

I'm not a chemist or a pharmacist, but I think you should do some more research before getting freaked out. A chemical is not either "harmful" or "safe" like black and white - it's not that simple. I mean, water is good for you, but it can kill you if you drink too much (by diluting the sodium in your blood to an unsafe level).

A quick google shows that the chemical you list above is "safe as used in cosmetic formulations". It caused harm to rats when it was fed to them, in large doses. But when applied to the skin, it stays at skin level (according to the linked study in the Int'l Journal of Toxicology) and doesn't get absorbed into your bloodstream - or if at all, then only in amounts small enough to have no effect.

If you're putting a dollop of conditioner on your hair, the chance of the BHT making it all the way inside you, at concentrations high enough to be harmful, must be vanishingly small.

So - I wouldn't trust an app that simply said "thumbs up" or "thumbs down" to any ingredient. You need the context.

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Unbridezilla · 19/03/2023 11:07

Squiblet · 19/03/2023 11:03

I'm not a chemist or a pharmacist, but I think you should do some more research before getting freaked out. A chemical is not either "harmful" or "safe" like black and white - it's not that simple. I mean, water is good for you, but it can kill you if you drink too much (by diluting the sodium in your blood to an unsafe level).

A quick google shows that the chemical you list above is "safe as used in cosmetic formulations". It caused harm to rats when it was fed to them, in large doses. But when applied to the skin, it stays at skin level (according to the linked study in the Int'l Journal of Toxicology) and doesn't get absorbed into your bloodstream - or if at all, then only in amounts small enough to have no effect.

If you're putting a dollop of conditioner on your hair, the chance of the BHT making it all the way inside you, at concentrations high enough to be harmful, must be vanishingly small.

So - I wouldn't trust an app that simply said "thumbs up" or "thumbs down" to any ingredient. You need the context.

Hurrah! Common sense! :)

OP, that app is basically like saying you shouldn't have paracetamol because overdosing might kill you.

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AbbyGal · 19/03/2023 11:25

I wasn't panicking and my original post was a little tongue in cheek but I am generally trying to be healhhy and reduce the chemicals I put in and on my body.

I know that they need to put preservatives in but it's just interesting to know what the abbreviations and long chemical names mean.

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Youreastar · 19/03/2023 11:29

Squiblet · 19/03/2023 11:03

I'm not a chemist or a pharmacist, but I think you should do some more research before getting freaked out. A chemical is not either "harmful" or "safe" like black and white - it's not that simple. I mean, water is good for you, but it can kill you if you drink too much (by diluting the sodium in your blood to an unsafe level).

A quick google shows that the chemical you list above is "safe as used in cosmetic formulations". It caused harm to rats when it was fed to them, in large doses. But when applied to the skin, it stays at skin level (according to the linked study in the Int'l Journal of Toxicology) and doesn't get absorbed into your bloodstream - or if at all, then only in amounts small enough to have no effect.

If you're putting a dollop of conditioner on your hair, the chance of the BHT making it all the way inside you, at concentrations high enough to be harmful, must be vanishingly small.

So - I wouldn't trust an app that simply said "thumbs up" or "thumbs down" to any ingredient. You need the context.

I'm afraid products applied to skin do eventually find their way into your bloodstream and body. It's a myth that they stay at skin level.

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Orangello · 19/03/2023 13:33

If someone claims a substance is 'toxic' but doesn't mention the dose, they are bullshitting. Even water is toxic in certain quantities.

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Squiblet · 19/03/2023 14:40

I'm afraid products applied to skin do eventually find their way into your bloodstream and body. It's a myth that they stay at skin level.

The extent to which they're absorbed depends on a lot of variables - which chemical, its concentration, the other chemicals it's paired with, the state of your skin, and so on. Look up "topical medication" on wikipedia for a full explanation.

The point is that you can't look at the side effects of a drug swallowed in relatively large quantities and assume that they'll be the same for the same drug applied topically (on the skin) in small quantities.

The pharmaceutical companies will have tested all these ingredients and ensured that any amount that does make it through the skin barrier will be safe for you. (The sector is pretty highly regulated, so they have to do a lot of tests.)

Tea tree oil is "natural" and plant-derived, and found in plenty of skincare products, but it would make you very sick if you drank it down!

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Clymene · 19/03/2023 15:13

Yuka is a VC backed business. VC backed businesses don't care about people's long term health or wellbeing, they are interested in making short term money. If they can exploit women's health anxieties around what they buy and put on their faces and bodies, it's an excellent business idea. I'm sure the more you use Yuka, the more you will depend on it to make recommendations for you.

Nice bit of advertising by the way OP 👍

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