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MNHQ have commented on this thread

What makes you feel confident as a parent when your DC is feeling under the weather? Tell Nurofen for Children for a chance to win a £250 Love2Shop voucher! NOW CLOSED
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MichelleMumsnet · 09/12/2014 09:01

Nurofen for Children have asked us to find out whether Mumsnetters feel confident in making decisions on their DC’s health. We’d also love to know what would make you feel more confident in these kinds of decisions.

Here’s what Nurofen for Children says, “Our research shows that 7 in 10 parents feel judged on the decisions they make for their children and a quarter of those surveyed said the health of their child is the most difficult subject to make decisions on. As parents, you want health advice you can trust. Nurofen for Children is trusted by parents - 9/10 parents who used it would recommend it to a friend*. If your child is struck down with cold, pain or fever, Nurofen for Children offers products to help manage their symptoms. It starts to work in just 15 minutes to bring down a temperature and is clinically proven to last longer than paracetemol to relieve a fever.”

So, what makes you feel confident in making health-related decisions? Would you like more support and if so, from who? Would you like more practical advice on treating your child’s symptoms? Would you like more resources available from your pharmacist? Or is it emotional support that would help your confidence? Would you appreciate more help from your partner or more advice from your friends? Whatever it is, we’d love to hear it.

Everyone who leaves their comments below will be entered into a prize draw to win a £250 Love2Shop voucher.

Thanks and good luck,

MNHQ

Terms and conditions
• To enter the competition simply post a comment below telling us what makes you feel better when you’re down with a winter bug
• Competition closes on 22nd December 2014.
• Entries posted after the closing date will not be considered
• One winner will be chosen from all entries
• Entrants must be aged 18 or over
• Competition hosted by Mumsnet, Deane House Studios (Studio 6), Greenwood Place, Highgate Road, London, NW5 1LB
• Mumsnet will choose the winner at random after the closing date
• Mumsnet will contact the winner privately to organise delivery of the prize
• The prize is £250 Love2Shop vouchers
• Full T&Cs can be found here.

*Survey of Survey of 2,000 parents by OnePoll. March 2014

**Survey by Mum's Views of 225 mums ‘9 out of 10 mums who used NfC would recommend it to a friend’. Last accessed August 2013

EI: Nurofen for Children Cold Pain & Fever 3 months to 9 years Orange / Strawberry. Nurofen for Children Orange / Strawberry 3 months to 12 years. Contains Ibuprofen. For relief of cold, pain and fever. Always read the label.

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SantasBassoon · 09/12/2014 09:30

We have a pharmacist in the family, so they're always my first port of call for general, non-emergency health advice. I have no worries about taking the children to the GP if I'm not sure I can deal with an illness myself though, and I've never been made to feel like a neurotic nuisance. As my GP says, he'd be working part-time if it wasn't for all the "I might be wasting your time, but..." patients.

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Sorehead · 09/12/2014 09:31

I'd definitely like more support from doctors/ other HCPs as I've felt fobbed off, patronised and like I'm being judged, on different occasions. I have only seen one doctor with whom I didn't experience the above. As a first time mother, with little experience of babies, visits to the doctor or conversations with the HV have knocked my confidence and it feels like no-one cares that my son is in pain; like I just have 'precious first born' syndrome.

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AdventCaroline · 09/12/2014 10:10

Not sure if I always feel that confident making health-related decisions on my own, so having DH there to give a second opinion is very helpful (he is usually a lot less "what-if-this-is-worst-case-scenario" than me.)

In fact, any other person being there helps, just to reassure you that you are making the right call. I think I am actually pretty good at judging what action to take (if any), but it is nice to have someone else to back up what I think.

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domesticslattern · 09/12/2014 10:20

The most important thing for me is that my work allows me to take time off when the DC are ill and doesn't put massive pressure on me. Everyone knows that sinking feeling when the DC are not quite right in the morning and yet you have to send them off to nursery, rather grey and quiet, and pray that they are going to last at least until lunchtime so you can make that all important meeting/ pitch etc.
My new work allows me to work flexibly and didn't bat an eyelid when I had to take time off within 2 weeks of starting when the DC went down in turn. They allowed me to trust my instincts that my DC really did need to be at home and being nurtured. In turn, I am loyal as anything.

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TakesTwoToTango · 09/12/2014 11:03

The more experience I have as a mum the more confident I am in trusting my instincts which are usually right when it matters, though I took time for me to learn that and trust myself.

It also took time to learn that for my DC, neurofen will often bring a temp down (and allow me to nurse them at home rather than drag them off to ooh in the middle of the night) when calpol/paracetamol doesn't/hasn't. I think it would be useful info to get 'out there' to new mums that sometimes/for some children ibuprofen can work better and it can be given in addition to paracetamol if necessary, staggered to help give continuous relief.

Also, it would be great if 111 was able to say anything other than 'take them to ooh doctor/A&E' - I have sometimes called wanted a discussion about something which really doesn't require a middle of the night trip to hospital but been sent anyway (and lectured on how irresponsible I would be not to put my DCs health above all other considerations when I queried the necessity!).

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marymanc · 09/12/2014 11:14

I need to say that for common colds and flue I manage quite well with paracetamol and neurofen having had doctors saying that I can use them together to bring the temperature down and for any pain.

However when the temperature is above 39 I start panicking and it is my DH who looks after the DC more and deal with it. Both of us though do not take decisions without a professional recommendation so we go to the NHS website or phone the GP or the out of hours doctors.

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Dolallytats · 09/12/2014 11:48

I have a local pharmacist who is great when I feel unsure of what to do if DC are under the weather.

What makes me feel better when I'm down with a Winter bug is being left alone! I want time to recuperate without having to deal with everyone and everything like I usually do. I also want someone else to make me hot drinks. DH is useless at the first one, but does do the second Smile

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SagaNorensSnowflakeTrousers · 09/12/2014 11:57

I think experience more than anything. I used to take DC1 to the GP every time he had so much as a sniffle...even if he was happy, playful, etc. I was pretty much always told "it's a virus, there's nothing we can do" many, many times before I realised there's a kind of, threshold for illness that you have to get to know before it's usually serious enough for a GP appointment. Now with DC2 I am much more willing to wait, check temperature, observe signs of un/wellness, offer lots of fluids/cuddles/rest and dose up with nurofen/calpol if necessary.

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MaryWestmacott · 09/12/2014 12:34

DH for a second opinion, and have been known to post on MN for advice!

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Gen35 · 09/12/2014 12:36

I like the 111 (in Scotland) service because from the questions they ask you can tell how serious it is and then take appropriate action. Painkillers are also very useful for making your baby comfortable and I feel more confident when the temperature is under control

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poorbuthappy · 09/12/2014 12:48

I feel quite confident now, having 3 kids, but remembering what it was like when I just had the 1, it is scary because you can always find the story of the 1 time the virus turned out to be something else.
Definitely speak to the pharmacist now, we have a good 1 locally who (touch wood) have never steered us wrong so far.

And not being afraid to raise queries. In the end it doesn't actually matter what the medical staff think of you...all that matters is your children's health.

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Maiyakat · 09/12/2014 12:50

I've never found pharmacists very helpful - I don't know if this is just because DD was still quite little last time I tried (under 2) and if they have restrictions on giving advice regarding such young children. Thankfully we've mostly managed with paracetamol and ibuprofen but never had a problem seeing a GP the same day on the few occasions we've needed to.

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MakeTeaNotWar · 09/12/2014 12:58

I get very anxious that common colds and bugs may turn sinister so I turn to mumsnet for advice quite often. I wish it was easier to get doctors appointments without being made to feel like an over-anxious worry wart

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26Point2Miles · 09/12/2014 13:20

When the kids are ill I miss my mum! That's who I'd like reassurance from. But just knowing we have a nhs/chemists/forums and helplines helps me keep the faith

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mrscumberbatch · 09/12/2014 13:21

No confidence whatsoever. I wish we were still in the days of having a family doctor who you could do
Emergency callouts to.

I've never met my own gp. We get a locum every time

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ouryve · 09/12/2014 13:33

I have a medically literate background and tend to consider myself pretty clued up. I would always seek advice if I was unsure, though. (That said, DS1 was "diagnosed" via the online tool, with swine flu, when he turned out to have had the first in a long series of abdominal migraines. By the time we got the Tamiflu, he was right as rain.)

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NoLongerJustAShopGirl · 09/12/2014 13:44

I generally use our local independent pharmacy for advice and when any of us get a winter bug we snuggle down with "mummy's magic soup" Yellow pepper, carrot and potato - the first time I made it the kids were getting over a really bad cold - hence "mummy's magic soup" made them better. Wink

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StillNoFuckingEyeDeer · 09/12/2014 13:49

The thing that makes me feel confident about looking after the DC when they're unwell, is knowing that I have a supply off ibuprofen suppositories I can use to treat a fever when they inevitably refuse to take oral medication & then throw up anything I do manage to give them. Much easier and kinder to use a suppository. I just wish they were available in England.

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serendipity1980 · 09/12/2014 13:51

I find that support from my husband and/or friends/family is what gives me greater confidence with children's health. Neurofen and Calpol are always good to use to help with colds etc. I have gained confidence over the years of being a mum.

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hydra234 · 09/12/2014 13:52

Forums are my go to after consulting the husband. It's nice to feel like you have that second opinion from asking others. We are no longer allowed to book appointments at my gp, you have to call them and they call you back 2 hours later in order to decide if you need an appointment or not. Mum is always a good resource, however somehow brandy seems to work its way into every single piece of her medical advice....

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rlouisa · 09/12/2014 14:19

i can almost call myself a pharmaist now cos i know which drugs to get for what ailment.
why should i go to a gp who will only tell me to 'watch her for a few days' when u know ur child is in desperate need of relief.

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Dawnywoo · 09/12/2014 14:25

I am always confident when my little one is under the weather (as she is now) that I can turn to Nurofen for children to take her temperature down.

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sharond101 · 09/12/2014 14:39

I am a Pharmacist and fairly confident when my child is ill. I am also confident in my family GP although getting an appointment can be difficult. My husband is reassuring telling me I am doing a good job although I would appreciate more of his hands on support but then he works full time and me only 2 days per week. I don't think the internet is a useful tool for parents unless a proper diagnosis has been made and even then the information given cannot be guaranteed to be accurate unless from a trusted source.

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ricecakeaddict · 09/12/2014 14:48

I completely agree with wanting someone else there to help me with decisions - it could be DH, a parent, a friend (particularly NCT) or someone else but I often want to ask them what symptoms they think DD is and whether I should administer medicine / go to the doctor etc.
Advice and reassurance from a caring GP who understands that parents can get concerned over the smallest thing is also much appreciated!

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MummyFever · 09/12/2014 14:52

In some senses the more experience I have the more confident I feel. I have four children now so I have become more confident and knowledgeable each time on the one hand.On the other hand, they are all different and they all surprise me constantly (keeps me on my toes) - so I never feel that I can totally relax.

I feel that advice is often conflicting and that can be confusing for parents, especially first time parents.

Ultimately you have to use a combination of trusting your instincts and going off what you think the best balanced advice is but it is no exact science.

After all parenting is something we make up as we go along - there is no manual!

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