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SN children

Reins

11 replies

PumpkinKlNG · 03/08/2021 19:21

Does anyone use reins with an older child ? 10+

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Boulshired · 04/08/2021 06:53

I use a rucksack, his is one used by runners so has two front fasteners and I use a padlock for security. I attach a handle strap so it works in the same way as the toddler pack reins. For his respite he has a creiling harness, it does the job but a bit bulky. He also has a waistcoat car seat harness that he put on outside of the car, which fastens behind his car seat and I will sometimes keep this on as it works similar to a harness. He has always needed a harness and is 14. Even when he is 2:1.

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PumpkinKlNG · 04/08/2021 10:50

Thank you, my daughter is 10 and has autism, she is a runner and I can’t take her anywhere I’m really struggling, she has no sense of danger and still walks out into roads etc, I don’t know what else to do other than reins but I’ve not seen another child wearing reins passed toddler years but I’m not sure what other alternative there is

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Boulshired · 04/08/2021 11:35

This reply has been deleted

Message withdrawn at poster's request.

Boulshired · 04/08/2021 15:29

I deleted the above post as it had my details on. These are similar to what I use, most of the time when side by side the rein part is not noticeable with the rucksack. The creiling (third picture) is more medical looking, more expensive and does cause “the looks”, though I’m past the point of caring I am still protective of him receiving the stares.

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secular39 · 07/08/2021 17:50

Personally I wouldn't put a 10 year old in reins. Your child is soon becoming a teenager and will be come bigger and stronger. The harness would eventually become a hinderance and your son would begin to resist. You may begin to lose control of the harness and it's counter productive.

I would opt for a wheelchair or employ an ABA person to teach your child road safety and to get him to walk next to you safely.

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Boulshired · 08/08/2021 12:23

secular39 no disrespect but unless you have a teenager who requires reins you have no idea what you are talking about. Unless you are suggesting placing my child in a wheelchair with arm and leg restraints and I find it very condescending that an ABA consultant can teach children to cross the road as a simply solution. Reins are the difference between keeping my son alive and him accessing the community or being kept locked indoors.

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secular39 · 08/08/2021 12:36

@Boulshired

secular39 no disrespect but unless you have a teenager who requires reins you have no idea what you are talking about. Unless you are suggesting placing my child in a wheelchair with arm and leg restraints and I find it very condescending that an ABA consultant can teach children to cross the road as a simply solution. Reins are the difference between keeping my son alive and him accessing the community or being kept locked indoors.

We have different opinions. That is fine. But no way would I put my own child in reins, I would work very very hard, get professionals involved to teach my child how to walk safely.
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Boulshired · 08/08/2021 12:47

My child has a severe learning disability and if only life was easy as you suggest. Unfortunately this is not my opinion it is my reality.

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secular39 · 08/08/2021 13:17

@Boulshired

My child has a severe learning disability and if only life was easy as you suggest. Unfortunately this is not my opinion it is my reality.

Sorry, I didn't mean to offend you. Every child and parent is different. My oldest child was runner, dear God, going out was a pain. But always keep high expectations of your children, no matter the level of functioning, always presume competence. This mantra keeps me going.
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Boulshired · 08/08/2021 13:55

That’s fine, it’s just life is difficult enough and having spent time and money with professionals including ABA teaching road safety is not an option nor is wheelchair. Harnesses are a vital lifesaver for children/adults like my son. Presuming competence has to be realistic, my son has already been run over at special school (luckily the car emergency braked) lost at respite, needing police assistance and fell 15 foot at respite. Safety is number one priority, reins are the equivalent of a seat belt for DS. No offence has been taken

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PumpkinKlNG · 09/08/2021 01:50

Didn’t realise this would cause a debate, My child is a runner and has no sense of danger, I can teach her all I want but She doesn’t have the understanding, I will not put her in a wheel chair as I don’t personally feel comfortable with that, I have 3 other children including a 4 year old so as you can imagine it’s very difficult to take her out (I’m a single parent so don’t have support taking them out) as she will just wonder off or attempt to run off, run in roads etc, if I am trying to do my shopping I can’t turn my back for a second to pay or scan etc because she would be gone I can’t teach her not she has zero awareness of the dangers I mean I have of course told her how dangerous it is but all she says is I’m a “super hero” I’m struggling to take her out because I can’t hold her hand at all times it’s not possible, I’m just trying to find a solution to keep her safe.
Up until recently my 4 year old was in the pram and that was easier as if my daughter ran off I could chase after her, now I’m struggling to do that with a slow 4 year old in tow, I can’t keep up with her if I ask her to come back she won’t she will just run away, she doesn’t stop at roads unless told to (she would keep walking unless told to stop) I can’t keep the youngest in a pram forever so now she’s walking and too big for it I find it hard to supervise 4 children out and about I need eyes in the back of my head.


Thank you for the suggestions Boulshired I will look into them

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