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early potty training?
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LeBFG · 06/06/2012 14:44

Hi

First posting on this topic. I have a nearly 15mo DS and as it's been hot so he's been running around commando. The thought popped into my head that I could try and get him to identify when he wees etc? He poos at predictable times. I could get a few second hand potties and stick him on them every once in a while??? Anyone tried this or am I barking up the wrong tree.

My DSis's two boys were both pt at 2.6y, but I found this showing in the olden days babies were pt much earlier. Any opinions?

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sc2987 · 06/06/2012 14:50

Look up Elimination Communication. I've been doing this with my daughter since she was born. The difference with an older child is that they have learnt to ignore the feelings that mean they need to go because they've always been in nappies, so it's harder to start later on. But still possible.

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LeBFG · 06/06/2012 14:54

I've read a little about EC - could never figure out how it could be done when they were twee little things? Hold them over a potty? Do you think 15 months is too late. DS watches his wee (I have no timetable and no expectations btw) and goes phish, like when he sees a tap running Grin

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worrywortisworrying · 06/06/2012 14:58

How's his speech? Can he tell you when he wants to go? Or communicate otherwise?

My son was 3.3YO when potty trained and I agree with SC that he was becoming aware that he didn't need to worry, as he had a nappy.

My DD was 18 months when she was dry in the day. at 2YO (her second birthday) she informed me that she would not be wearing nappies at night either and has been dry since. So some kids DO do it.

I would also say that night nappies should go. I took both of mine out of night nappies and DS (who I truly believe would still be in night nappies now if I allowed it) was dry within days. I refused to allow him a good night sleep and pee himself. If he pees (and he had the odd accident) then it was going to affect HIM first and foremost. Worked a treat with my kids.

All kids are different, though. DS has autism, whereas DD is NT. This is simply my experience and what worked for us. :-)

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ItsAllGoingToBeFine · 06/06/2012 14:59

If you know when he poos then of course put him on the toilet - why deal with messy nappies if you don't have too.

DD pretty reliably only poos in the toilet and has done since she was tiny.

Still wees in nappy and is completely unaware of wee, but no pooey nappies is great!

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LeBFG · 06/06/2012 15:21

Indeed, no pooey nappies! I was going to buy, and probably still will, some cloth nappies. I'm just getting fed up with nappies that only need changing because he's had a poo. After reading a very little of the website above, I can already see that DS pees a lot less at night and during naps. He only poos after a meal. I have stone floors indoors and he's often out in the garden in the day, so a little pee here or there is no big deal frankly.

He has no speech but some understanding - he'll follow an instruction like bring me x. He likes to imitate noises (like the tap running). I know when he poos (face concentrated, stops other activity) and when he pees he pulls at his nappy and partly bends as if he was going to fart.

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