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22 months - is it autism?
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meg1209 · 11/07/2022 10:47

Hi,

Would love some advice. My 22 month old little boy has been referred to have an assessment for autism, these are his 'signs':

• no speech ( lots of babbling)
• understands words but not 'commands'
• stims; flaps arms, lays down and kicks legs, sometimes vocally stims when learns new noise.
• fleeting eye contact
• ignores everyone apart from me and a select few people
• likes toys that spin

Saying all that he is very affectionate towards me. He sleeps and eats well. Has no sensory issues. Overall is is a very calm, happy go lucky, smiley and content toddler.

Does this sound like anyone else's experience with autism?

Thanks in advance!

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Nik2879 · 11/07/2022 10:54

My little boy is nearly 2 as well and do talk yet either also doesn't really understand commands. He was late with walking so was hoping his talking was the same bit worried now.

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Nik2879 · 11/07/2022 10:54

Sorry that should of said doesnt talk yet.

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ofwarren · 11/07/2022 10:55

Quite possibly
Even if not, it won't do any harm to have him assessed.

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TheVanguardSix · 06/08/2022 09:35

As a parent of a diagnosed ASD DS (8), I understand why diagnoses happen around age 3-4 and not sooner (mine began assessment at 2 and was diagnosed at 4). Because so much behaviour associated with ASD can simply be standard toddler stuff. It could be easy to misdiagnose a toddler.
That said, yes, what you've listed certainly can be associated with ASD. What you've listed can also simply be your little boy developing at his own pace.
Still, there's nothing wrong with plugging him into the assessment process now, for peace of mind.

Does he point or clap? And when you call his name, does he respond to you/come to you?

Apart from raising my own son on the spectrum, I worked in a SEN school for autistic children. Those kids at the school were the most loving, smiley, warm, and engaging bunch I'd ever worked with.
My own DS is and has always been incredibly affectionate. Human touch is really important to him.
Some autistic kids are incredibly emotional- in fact, the majority are. Of course, some are very detached. But it's a spectrum and as they say, If you've met one person with autism, you've met one person with autism.

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