Threads

See more results

Topics

Usernames

Mumsnet Logo
Please
or
to access all these features

WEBCHAT GUIDELINES: 1. One question per member plus one follow-up. 2. Keep your question brief. 3. Don't moan if your question doesn't get answered. 4. Do be civil/polite. 5. If one topic or question threatens to overwhelm the webchat, MNHQ will usually ask for people to stop repeating the same question or point.

MNHQ have commented on this thread

Webchat about Dyslexia with Karen Mace from British Dyslexia Association - Wednesday 3 October, 9pm
112

RachelMumsnet · 01/10/2018 17:16

Dyslexia Awareness Week runs from Monday 1st to Sunday 7 October and we’ve organised a webchat with Karen Mace, Head of Assessments and Professional Level Training at the British Dyslexia Association on Wednesday 3 October between 9 and 10pm.

Kate Mace is a qualified specialist teacher and assessor for dyslexia. She has 25-years teaching experience, including four years as a deputy headteacher and seven years as a special educational needs co-ordinator.

Dyslexia Awareness Week will run from today until Sunday 7 October and this year the focus is on 21st century dyslexia. The week, organised by the British Dyslexia Association, will include activities in classrooms, workplaces and online (using the hashtag #21stcenturydyslexia), competitions and much more. Helen Boden, CEO of the British Dyslexia Association said: “For too long, dyslexia has been seen as a negative associated only with difficulties reading and writing. For this year’s Dyslexia Awareness Week, we are focusing on 21st century dyslexia. We will be holding events, training and competitions looking at the massive advances in understanding of dyslexia, including the benefits it brings, and technology to support those identified as dyslexic.”

If you’d like to join the discussion, or have questions you’d like to put to Karen, please join us here - or if you're unable to join us at this time, post questions for Karen in advance on this thread.

OP's posts:
Please
or
to access all these features

LARLARLAND · 01/10/2018 17:55

I am really looking forward to this.

Please
or
to access all these features

CAAKE · 01/10/2018 19:18

Brilliant! Thank you for hosting this.

Please
or
to access all these features

keepmoving · 01/10/2018 20:21

Coming from a family with dyslexia- mother, DH and DS, delighted to see a focus on the positives...

Please
or
to access all these features

bestbefore · 01/10/2018 20:56

Brilliant!

Please
or
to access all these features

wallowinwater · 01/10/2018 22:49

Yes

Please
or
to access all these features

WhiskyIrnBru · 01/10/2018 22:54

Fab!

Please
or
to access all these features

borntobequiet · 02/10/2018 05:09

I teach Maths, and have long had an interest in the impact of dyslexia on Maths learning (as distinct from and different from dyscalculia). I believe that for some individuals the impact on Maths is greater than on English reading and writing, as is generally understood. Has there been any serious research in this area? (I also believe that this aspect is widely ignored and misunderstood in schools because most SEN teachers/SENCOS do not come from a Maths background.)

Please
or
to access all these features

InProgress · 02/10/2018 06:53

At age 8 my son (now 10) was tested for dyslexia within his primary school and they found his working memory is very good (80th percentile) but his processing capability at that time is 3-4th percentile.

He did not get a dyslexia or specific learning difficulty diagnosis despite his results. Should this difficulty be under the dyslexia umbrella and is there anything you would recommend to support him?

Please
or
to access all these features

Rainbowshine · 02/10/2018 07:34

I ‘d like to ask what the BDA plan to do to educate educators and others about dysgraphia? It feels like the poor relation compared to the other “dys’s” sometimes 🙁. Thanks, will be excited to see the chat.

Please
or
to access all these features

LARLARLAND · 02/10/2018 07:39

I would like to echo Rainbowshine’s question in respect of dyscalculia. In my experience teachers do not have a clue how to spitbitborbhow to teach children with a diagnosis. They are however quick to tell these children they are ‘not trying hard enough’ or that they are ‘not academic.’

Please
or
to access all these features

LARLARLAND · 02/10/2018 07:40

That should read ‘how to spot or how to teach dyscalculia.’

Please
or
to access all these features

Fanwah · 02/10/2018 07:54

Id like to echo the questions on maths and dysgraphia.
And also the one on educating educators.
My son has had a soul crushing time at school and is now home educated and not very happy about it. At secondary level the 'support' for him took the form of someone following him about most of thr day and checking in on him, about which he was mortified and resentful. We didnt even realise why at the time but it can be briefly explained as deeply unhelpful for burgeoning social anxiety. Poor kid.

Please
or
to access all these features

MollyHuaCha · 02/10/2018 08:36

Once he was officially declared dyslexic-dysgraphic-dyspraxic, teachers seemed more willing to accept that DS was actually trying, but no one actually gave him any help or additional support, despite the recommendations in the report.

Luckily we could afford years of private tutors who made an enormous difference.

In all we paid for three assessments - age 8, pre GCSE, pre A level which cost £1300.

The only tangible benefit from the diagnosis has been extra exam time.

So my question is, what is the actual purpose of official assessment?

Please
or
to access all these features

windysocks · 02/10/2018 08:58

I would like to know whats the difference between assessment for dyslexia by a psychologist or a specialist teacher? my ds is 10 school reluctant to assess but Dh has severe dyslexic traits ( never diagnosed) but has had massive negative impact on his adult life - he is currently on anti depressants. what is best way to go about getting an assessment? possibly for both? x

Please
or
to access all these features

KalindaBlack · 02/10/2018 09:05

Hi, do you see a lot of ASD kids with dyslexia? If so what proportion of ASD kids do you see are dyslexic. Thanks

Please
or
to access all these features

harveyarnoldrosie · 02/10/2018 10:13

My 10 year old daughter is struggling with anxiety and is on the SEN register with dyslexia. She has moved up to secondary school and is being offered a lot of 'intervention' and even counselling but this is making her more miserable as she believes it's identifying' her as being 'thick'. She is very athletic but is now saying she wants to quit this because she wants to be 'clever' like her peers.
(Her younger sister (7) has just been assessed for dyslexia with confirmation that she is too.)
I believe that the 'intervention' from first school is key and unfortunately for my eldest this was not available.
Do you have any suggestions that could help my daughter at school given that her self esteem is non existent?

Please
or
to access all these features

Wardrobehamster · 02/10/2018 13:08

I know children and adults with dyslexia and they all present. Wet differently. Is there a definition of what dyslexia is?

Please
or
to access all these features

DeloresJaneUmbridge · 02/10/2018 13:46

Hi Karen, it stills seems very difficult to get education services interested in diagnosing dyslexia. Do you find there is a general reluctance to diagnose children with Dyslexia? If so what are your thoughts on the reasons.

Please
or
to access all these features

cakedup · 02/10/2018 14:02

Ds is 13, year 9. Struggled at school due to dyslexia his whole school life. He is in the lower end for practically every subject and falls way behind his peers. I have been in constant communication with his schools to get support for him, currently trying for an ehc plan. He is practically phobic when it comes to exams. My question is...should he be made to go through sitting his gcses? When I am sure it will cause nothing but stress for him? It is not looking likely that he would get very far with then.

Please
or
to access all these features

beenandgoneandbackagain · 02/10/2018 15:34

What is the best way to help children at the start of their journey so they don't feel too different or imperfect? How do we let our otherwise very bright daughter know that the reason she can't read as well as her classmates is because of this issue, and it doesn't mean she is stupid or that there is anything wrong with her, just that she has different learning needs?

Please
or
to access all these features

hairbearbitch · 02/10/2018 16:46

Do you have any opinion on compulsory Maths and English GCSE resits for FE students?

Please
or
to access all these features

DamsonGin · 02/10/2018 18:54

Do you think things are getting better, have stagnated or have even got worse within education? I've been a school governor at primary till recently and have a child in secondary, and do not feel at all that the education system and curriculum supports, adequately identifies or does justice to dyslexic children, including my own. This includes the wider use of technology to help with wider non-paper based learning.

Please
or
to access all these features

Hello1290 · 02/10/2018 19:12

Hi Karen

Do you think children on the autism spectrum can also have dyslexia or would you say their difficulties are part of Autism? My dd struggles with writing her thoughts on paper and her writing is messy with spelling mistakes. She can read pretty well but struggles to break unfamiliar words down. She is articulate but stutters sometimes.

School aren't interested in assessing for dyslexia. She is supported well with her learning at school due to her ASD diagnosis.

Wondering if we should have her tested for dyslexia.

Please
or
to access all these features

Glassigh · 02/10/2018 20:44

Hi Karen
Thanks for coming on!
My son is 13 in year 9. Diagnosed by an Independent Educational Psychologist as dyslexic. Main issues are spelling, structure of sentences, punctuation, organising work. Fortunately good at maths, but can't tell you the months of the year/days of the week.
Secondary school have given him no extra help at all. He is just expected to do the same as everyone else, but no specific help for his problems. When he was diagnosed, he scored in the top 10% of ability, but is achieving low to middle grades. School say he is fine. I think he is underachieving majorly, but school are not bothered. He is nowhere near statement territory.

What should/ can I do? School have basically said, yes we accept he is dyslexic but seem happy for that not to be worked on at all. Confused

Please
or
to access all these features

Beesandfrogsandfleas · 02/10/2018 21:54

I’m struggling as much with the low self esteem my ds has about his work as with the actual work. There’s only so many times I can tell him about famous people with dyslexia - he’s having none of it!

Please
or
to access all these features
Please create an account

To comment on this thread you need to create a Mumsnet account.