Threads

See more results

Topics

Usernames

Mumsnet Logo
Please
or
to access all these features

University in USA
7

OlafLovesAnna · 25/10/2020 12:43

Do they tend to accept A-Levels, or would it be better to do SATs? Additionally, what would the impact of doing 16-18 education in the US, then coming back to the UK?

I'm trying to work out what the best thing for my sons is when we move (temporarily) with my husband's job next year.

OP's posts:
Please
or
to access all these features

movingonup20 · 25/10/2020 12:51

You need sat's really for decent places, but these are in addition to a levels, lots of British kids (and other nationalities) sit them in addition to their national exams) typically they are taken t 16/17. US high school education is not at the same level as a levels which a particular problem for science courses etc in the U.K. that follow on from a levels curriculum wise, exh has had American students drop out in the first year because they couldn't cope with massive step up and different style of teaching. I would say ideally you choose one system or the other, if anything liberal arts degrees in the us are better for generalists who go to university as more of a finishing school (me included) whereas U.K. universities are more geared to specialism hence only 3 years. Oh and university costs more usually in the us unless you get a bursary which as a British new arrival he won't, but also check his likelihood of being classed as an overseas student if you took him to the USA for 2 years and he wants to go home for university - at 18 he gets to choose remember!

Please
or
to access all these features

OlafLovesAnna · 25/10/2020 13:53

@movingonup20 thanks that's so helpful.

We're in an odd situation as its a military move and we arrive in July having to decide whether to get the newly 18yr old into university here or there and the one who will have just done GCSEs into school in the US or boarding school for A Levels in the UK.

I had hoped the University aged one might be treated as an in-state student but I can't seem to find the residency requirements. That one wants to do history so its more of a 'box tick' degree rather than anything massively scientific rigorous he's looking for.

Unfortunately the forces don't have a lot of info as most people seem to send their kids to the UK but it would be great if there was an option for him to go to university in Virginia too.

OP's posts:
Please
or
to access all these features

Ulelia · 25/10/2020 15:36

For the 18yr old- nearly all US universities are test optional this year, as a result of many kids not being able to take the SAT. So your 18 year old won't need to either. Also be aware that often, A Levels give credit which means they can skip certain courses in the first year, as us education is 12 years, not 13, so there's overlap. However, he's unlikely to get instate tuition having only just arrived, you normally have to be resident for at least a year. He'd need to look for merit aid to reduce the total cost, or look for community colleges. These are cheap or even free, and after two years you can transfer to a 4 year college and hopefully by that stage pay in state tuition.
For the younger one, applying to the UK will be OK, but they'll need to make sure they take AP classes as well as the normal high school curriculum. Normally 3-5 APs are required by UK universities in place of A Levels. It would be worth check the websites of a few courses and unis that might be interesting, to see the requirements. The experience of living abroad is nearly always positive though, so I'd recommend it!

Please
or
to access all these features

HoldMyLobster · 29/10/2020 22:59

Check that the 18 year old will actually get to come with you to the US on your visa. I can't remember if the rules change for dependents at 18 or 21.

I'd be very surprised if you got in-state tuition, although given that it's a military move that might get him/her a scholarship of some kind. It's very unpredictable though.

I would keep the 16 year old in the UK at boarding school to do A levels. It's a very weird and huge jump from the UK to the US system at 16. The order in which they take subjects just isn't comparable.

(DH and I both went to school in the UK, and he was a teacher in the UK. He went to college in the US as a US citizen. We now have kids at school and college in the US.)

Please
or
to access all these features

turnitonagain · 29/10/2020 23:03

US high school education is not at the same level as a levels which a particular problem for science courses etc in the U.K. that follow on from a levels curriculum wise, exh has had American students drop out in the first year because they couldn't cope with massive step up and different style of teaching.

The Advanced Placement (AP) programme is equivalent to A Levels and American students aiming for the top universities sit them. UK unis accept APs as equivalent to A Levels for American applicants. Also a growing number of American high schools offer the IB.

Please
or
to access all these features

spongedog · 29/10/2020 23:08

University in Virginia? There are lots of highly rated universities in Virginia (Maryland and DistCol too). But I like PPs would keep the DC in the same system.

I would keep with UK for the younger - let them finish KS 5 - then they can perhaps choose. Although military placement? When are you next off to the next placement?

Can the oldest do what he wants to in the US? My understanding is that the US system tends to be general for 2 years and then specialised. He will have been geared for the UK system, so specialising from the off.

Please
or
to access all these features

Guymere · 30/10/2020 10:00

I actually holidayed in Virginia 18 months ago. As we had a coffee in Williamsburg I chatted to a dad whose son was looking around William and Mary university there. (Buildings designed by Sir Christopher Wren!) He said there was a big reduction for in state applicants but it was still $35,000 pa. For non residents it was over $50,000. We also had a good look around the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. There were student tours going on - very interesting! It’s a stunning university. Not sure what the fees are. But for any US university, you need deep pockets.

Frankly - I would stay totally in the uk for education. Go and have a look around these universities though! They are both wonderful.

Please
or
to access all these features
Please create an account

To comment on this thread you need to create a Mumsnet account.