Threads

See more results

Topics

Usernames

Mumsnet Logo
Please
or
to access all these features

What do I need to become a primary school teacher?
12

bluenose1986 · 28/07/2017 16:50

Just that really.

I only have GSCE qualifications at the moment so I am fully aware of the need to gain extra qualifications I just don't know where to start and what are the best options?

Also any information on funding that is available would be really helpful.

OP's posts:
Please
or
to access all these features

deary · 28/07/2017 16:53

I did an OU degree and then a PGCE.
I don't have A levels.

Please
or
to access all these features

rollonthesummer · 28/07/2017 16:55

A levels and then a degree is the standard route. You can do a PGCE or scitt/Teach First type placement after your degree.

I'm sure there are other routes but you'll need a degree whatever you do if you want to become qualified.

Please
or
to access all these features

Changerofname987654321 · 28/07/2017 16:58

You can do a degree in primary education. You would need to do a levels or an access course first and have experience in a primary school.

I would suggest you spend two weeks at two separate primary schools first and ask the teachers about the amount of work they do outside the classroom before you start on this route.

Please
or
to access all these features

PotteringAlong · 28/07/2017 16:58

A degree (in a national curriculum subject would be helpful) and then a teaching qualification. Assuming you're not 16 and about to do alevels, you might need to do an access course first for your degree

Please
or
to access all these features

LadyMacnet · 28/07/2017 17:03

You will need a degree. I am not sure you will be able to do a B Ed - Bachelor of Education - though without A levels. A B Ed is a degree route chosen by some people who want to train as primary teachers. You will need GCSE pass grades in English, Maths and science.

Deary's route into teaching is worth investigating.

If you google the government website Get Into Teaching there is good information. It also includes some details about possible bursaries.

Once you have your BA or BSc degree you basically have a choice of going down 2 post grad training routes which both last a year: a PGCE, which is university based, or an almost entirely school based training route, which goes under a number of different names but a common one is Schools Direct. You apply through UCAS.

Please
or
to access all these features

PurpleDaisies · 28/07/2017 17:05

Whys your current situation?

Everyone above is right about the qualifications you'd need. Have you considered looking at becoming a HLTA M?

Please
or
to access all these features

PurpleDaisies · 28/07/2017 17:05

Sorry, rogue M there!

Please
or
to access all these features

McDougal · 28/07/2017 17:12

Probably an access then a degree before PGCE. There are some universities offering a three year undergrad which gives you an honours degree plus QTS but suppose it depends if they're local to you.

Please
or
to access all these features

BoneyBackJefferson · 28/07/2017 17:12

Have you considered looking at becoming a HLTA

Ah yes, all the crap with very little pay.

Please
or
to access all these features

bluenose1986 · 28/07/2017 17:14

Thanks for all your replies.

I am currently working full time in a job that I hate. I have wanted to get back into education and gain better qualifications to change my career prospects. Always just been too scared to take the leap.

Primary education has always been a pull for me and is something that I think I would be good at and could actually do something that could make a difference.

After having my two children and getting over the crippling nursery fee years I think this is the best time to do it.

I know there is a lot of work to do and sacrifices will have to be made but I think it's time I do something for myself.

OP's posts:
Please
or
to access all these features

rollonthesummer · 28/07/2017 17:17

Go into it with your eyes fully open. It used to be a wonderful job, but in my opinion, can be utterly soul-destroying. It currently has a very high drop-out rate for a reason. I wouldn't actually recommend it to anyone at the moment.

Talk to teachers and get real opinions about what it says like.

Please
or
to access all these features

Changerofname987654321 · 28/07/2017 18:11

1/4 of new teachers leave within the first 5 years. I am not surprised considering primary school teachers work an average of 60 hours a week. Meaning that per hour they are paid less than minimum wage. If you do a degree and a PGCE you will have student loan debt of £28,000 just from fees. This does not include living costs.

Teaching is definitely not a family friendly job. I would encourage anyone who wants to go into teaching to find out more about what it entails before committing.

Please
or
to access all these features
Please create an account

To comment on this thread you need to create a Mumsnet account.