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Medicine as a Mature Student?
13

NukaColaGirl · 10/07/2017 12:46

Has anyone done this or know anyone who has?

I have AAB in Biology, Chemistry and Law. I can drive. The local Uni is on the excellent tram route.

I'm a single parent but I have an excellent support system from DP (very flexible job) PILs (retired but young - late 50s)

Want to apply for 2018 entry meaning I'll be 32 and DCs will be 12 and 10. Haven't sat the UKCAT yet. Have emailed at length with Uni.

Please tell me if I'm being ridiculous.

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NukaColaGirl · 10/07/2017 12:47

ExDP ExPILs

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2014newme · 10/07/2017 12:50

How will you fund yourself and your children whilst studying?
Have you done any relevant work experience? I understand thats a prerequisite
Will you get in with those a levels?
Will pils have kids whilst you ate working nights?
Will your kids mind you not being around much during their teenage years?

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titchy · 10/07/2017 12:56

I think the lack of recent study and lack of relevant work experience (or do you have some?) will be the main barriers. Can you do some OU modules for a year to demonstrate your academic ability? If you have family support the rest should be ok / but don't underestimate the demands. You'll be permanently shattered.

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NukaColaGirl · 10/07/2017 14:02

The Uni I've spoke to don't accept any OU modules at all. I did my A Levels recently - sat them when I was 28 (I'm currently 30) They said my AAB was fine as it's different entry requirements for mature students.

The only reason I didn't go to Uni straight away is due to ExDP leaving for OW Hmm And didn't want DCs to have any more upheaval so put it on the back burner, but we're all settled now so it feels like the right time to start looking.

Re funding: plenty of Uni funding for single parents. Looked into that before I even started night classes doing A Levels as they were bloody expensive and I didn't want to waste my time or money if Uni wasn't an option.

We have 50/50 residency as we only live round the corner from each other. I currently work Fri/Sat/Sun nights in a club so pretty grim hours and they're with their Dad from Fri 6pm till Monday morning when he drops them at school. ExPILs retired last year and ExMIL is chomping at the bit for something to do and has been really supportive/encouraging the whole time.

Teenagers - well whatever job I do when they are that age I imagine I won't be doing a 10-2 school hours term time only job by then, I can't get one with those hours now Sad

Not formal work experience but I cared for both my Great Grandparents 3 times a week when they both had Alzheimer's for 2 years before they died, and I have a disabled DNiece who I look after on a semi regular basis when DSis needs respite care.

I suppose there's no harm in applying and given how competitive it is I'm not confident I'd get a place anyway but on the off chance I do I want to make sure I have all my bases covered iyswim? I'm also looking at Pharmacy as back up.

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usernameinfinito · 10/07/2017 14:09

I am afraid I have no advice to give, but it looks like you are determined and I feel happy for you already, as I have the feeling that you will achieve your goals😊

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Decorhate · 10/07/2017 18:46

My dd is studying medicine & there are lots of mature students on her course. Maybe have a look on The Student Room to see if there is any useful information there?

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MedSchoolRat · 10/07/2017 20:00

Minimum AAA for our medical school. I think tariff wise we are in the bottom half of the table.

Would you consider something like a Physician's Associate, instead? 2 year degree, and you actually get time to talk to patients. Pharmacy is a good career, too, but not easy.

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StinkyMcgrinky · 10/07/2017 20:13

Lots of our mature students with children/jobs/financial responsibilities etc....do really well Smile we've had paramedics do the degree while working, parents who have taken mat leave half way through and come back, people who have been some adjustments to fit around life but have all graduated. In fact one of our mature students who graduated a few years back treated my son in hospital recently, was really lovely Smile

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ShatteredHCP · 10/07/2017 20:29

Can't help with the medicine side of things but as a pharmacist, please don't consider pharmacy as a 'back up' to medicine!

They are completely different careers and universities are now wise to the whole putting down pharmacy as a last option thing that's being going on for years .
Your personal statement will make it blindingly obvious that you're going for medicine and consider pharmacy a back up and you will be penalised for it.

As a hospital pharmacist I will say that it is more family friendly than medicine. I generally work 9-5:30, with approx one weekend day and two late nights/on call per month although it does vary from hospital to hospital. For community pharmacy, you're looking at longer hours ime.

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FaintlyHopeful · 10/07/2017 20:38

It's not the same but I went back to uni aged 38 to do undergrad psychology and have just finished clinical training. It is totally doable and at least with medicine you are on track to an almost guaranteed job. I had to do the undergrad, work to get the relevant training then jump through hoops to get into clinical.

I wouldn't, therefore be put off by the length of the course. Mature students are always much more committed and in my experience find studying easier because we are so much more organised.

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Kr1stina · 19/07/2017 15:22

My brother did this as a mature student is his late 20s with two kids. However his wife supported him practically and financially and he already had a science PhD so he went straight into second year.

He's now a GP and support wife and four kids working 3.5 days a week, so it's good money and family friendly.

You need to do some day's works shadowing in Medicine and healthcare , probably about 2 weeks worth. Most unis will just bin your application if your PS doesn't mention this in detail. Then you need an excellent score in the UKCAT.

Have you researched other unis ? Dont put all your eggs in one basket.

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Abra1d · 19/07/2017 15:44

Not formal work experience but I cared for both my Great Grandparents 3 times a week when they both had Alzheimer's for 2 years before they died, and I have a disabled DNiece who I look after on a semi regular basis when DSis needs respite care.

I think your kind of experience is really valued by medical school admissions people. It seemed to my daughter that they were much more interested in this than in shadowing/placements, some of which are very hard to get. a care home might be a good place to do some volunteering in.

The 'challenges i experienced/saw and what it made me consider' questions are useful to ponder. Did you see lots of healthcare/multidisciplinary professionals working together? What was difficult and what worked?

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user1471531877 · 19/07/2017 17:22

I really admire you but medicine is an awfully long slog with 5 years training and then many years in unsociable hours /relatively poorly paid if you work out the hourly rate for juniors.
Have you thought about allied health careers? Radiography has good career structure / better work life balance and plenty of jobs.
The stress in medicine now is immense - please think carefully before committing you and your family to a long path.

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