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Contact lenses base curve?!
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Evvy543 · 04/11/2016 00:18

I want to try contact lenses but my base curve isn't written on my prescription.

Short sighted

Right eye is 1.75
Left eye is 2.00

I don't want to have to go and get them through the opticians, it cost a fortune!

How do I figure this out and can anyone suggest some websites/comfortable lenses?

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chipmonkey · 04/11/2016 01:10

You can't figure it out without having a contact lens assessment. I am an optometrist, by the way. We assess the Base curve by measuring the curvature of the cornea which you can only do using specialised equipment for that purpose, then selecting a trial lens with the Base curve we think will fit and then assessing the fit. We then can write a prescription for a lens with the correct Base curve, diameter and power. But it's not that simple either. In my experience different brands can fit differently even if they have the same Base curve.
I honestly don't think it's wise to try to do a DIY job on this. Badly fitting lenses can do a lot of damage, if you haven't worn lenses before, you need to be instructed on insertion and removal and contact lens hygiene or there is a risk of scratching your eye or infecting it.
Please be careful!

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Evvy543 · 04/11/2016 10:54

Thank you for your response.

I agree, it's not wise to try and guess. I won't do it.

I really can't afford the opticians prices though :(

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TondelayaDellaVentamiglia · 04/11/2016 11:04

most opticians will do a free trial so you can certainly trial them for free,

whether or not they will give you your contact lens specifications so you can purchase from the internet with regulation or so much as a care to the ongoing health of your eyes is another matter.

regardless of where you get your lenses you should have a proper contact lens check up every 12 months and this can cost upward of £25 so this should be factored into your costs.

obviously if you get your lenses from a bricks and mortar business they tend to cover you for a good deal more than just a box of lenses at knock down prices.

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chipmonkey · 04/11/2016 18:18

Evvy, do try shopping around. If you were willing to pay a monthly direct debit, a lot of opticians will do a good deal. And if you're in the UK, most Opticians will give you a copy of your contact lens prescription once you've had the assessment. Also ask if they can match the online price. Some will, in order to keep your business. Unfortunately we can't always do that because some online sites seem to be able to sell them for less than we can buy them but it's worth asking.

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Themanfrommancc · 05/11/2016 08:14

My very best advice is to aim to use daily disposable contacts and to have a proper contact lens assessment with a good optometrist. I tend to use an independent. I have found many of the chains hopeless and too keen to upsell you stuff you dont need.

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BretonStripe · 05/11/2016 08:17

Specsavers are usually affordable...where are you OP?

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Fairylea · 05/11/2016 08:18

Honestly you can't be too careful with your eyes.

I have very tricky eyes and I get my contact lenses from specsavers for £13 a month which includes solution. Daily ones are about £32 a month but I find the monthly ones suit me fine. Also it works out well for me as you're entitled to a free pair of glasses every two years on the scheme too- I just pay the extra £50 for very thin lenses as my eyes are -10 in both sides. For me it's worth having the contact lenses just for the glasses deal.

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MrsPnut · 05/11/2016 08:20

Definitely have a proper assessment, spec savers do it for about £25. You may need to try a number of different brands of lenses until you find the right ones.
Once you have a prescription then you can buy them online - I use the Vision Direct website for mine.

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NuggetofPurestGreen · 05/11/2016 08:25

Don't do it OP you need a proper trial and fitting. Specsavers do a free 5 day trial and you can see how you get on. The initial exam and consultation is around £20 i think you don't have to sign up although I actually found specsavers to work out the same as the online retailers when you sign up for direct debit.

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NotTheFunKind666 · 22/01/2019 10:32

Which optician did you go too? Your base curve should be written on your prescription. Perhaps get another test elsewhere. Once you get your prescription, you can get your contact lenses anywhere you like, don't let your optician convince you otherwsie. Buying online is always cheaper.

You can find an optician's buyers guide for specsavers: www.feelgoodcontacts.com/optician/specsavers-contact-lenses

Same site has other opticians listed on the side bar so you can check Asda, Boots ect. Feel Good Contacts have the cheapest prices online.

Hope that's useful.

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underneaththeash · 23/01/2019 08:40

Notthe - the Original OP (from 2 years ago) didn't have a contact lens fitting, just an eye exam.

The base curve is the measurement of how curved the lens. People with less curved eyes need a different one than people with more curved eyes.

We can get an idea of the base curve needed during a contact lens assessment, but even then you need to actually asess the fit of the lens on the cornea; as a 8.6BC lens from one manufacturer, may not fit the cornea in the same way as a 8.6BC from another manufacturer. This is dur to differences in lens thickness, construction, edge profile and the patient's own lid anatomy and corneal profile.

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