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Feminism: chat

So, this is just light hearted conversation

32 replies

Beansycheese · 09/09/2022 23:22

I would describe myself as a woman, not a lady. I am definitely not a lady. But when my kids were young, if I had to talk about someone, I would use the terms lady or gentlemen, for example 'move out the way so the lady can get through' I always felt it was more respectful, but not very feminist, if you see what I mean. Anyway, I know I am over thinking it, especially since my youngest is at high school and travels independently now. But has anyone else had this quandary?

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Mochudubh · 26/09/2022 18:49

tunainatin · 12/09/2022 21:46

I was told that 'woman' originates from 'woe of man', going back to the Christian idea of Adam being tempted by Eve, and so lady is a good alternative.
I do always feel bemused if it's used to refer to me though!

I always thought it was from womb-man, a man/person with a womb.

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Outofexcuses · 26/09/2022 20:52

Yes Shepostsamongus I think you’re right. Can’t say I’m charmed but it does make me laugh.

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alexdgr8 · 26/09/2022 21:14

you guys, or hello guys, does include women.
it's just a friendly or informal way to address a group of people.

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alexdgr8 · 26/09/2022 21:17

if someone was described as a person, it used to be rather slighing; meaning they were of indeterminate social standing and probably inferior.
example, the butler to his master, sir there is a person asking for you at the kitchen door.
he/she is obviously not a gentleman/woman, else the butler would have said so.

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alexdgr8 · 26/09/2022 21:19

slighting.

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Binglebong · 26/09/2022 22:06

I use ladies and gentlemen. At its root I suppose that the "better" people were ladies and gentlemen so calling someone that is indicating that you consider them with regard.

But i just use it because it's polite - saying man and woman somehow reduces them to a body whereas lady or gentleman is a person.

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Beansycheese · 29/09/2022 22:22

Outofexcuses · 26/09/2022 17:22

Something that’s just started happening to me - being addressed by random men as ‘young lady’. I’m 60 with white hair. I think it’s supposed to be a compliment? Totally baffling.

Is your mother home?

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