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Feminism: chat

Twitter Thread: Afghan Women Through History

10 replies

ScreamingMeMe · 18/08/2021 15:50

A twitter user has compiled a thread about some notable Afghan women throughout history. Well worta a read: some strong, feminist women there.

"For comfort and inspiration."

"To know, too, that their suffering at the hands of men is ancient&has always been resisted. So they resist it also. "

"This is why, for example,11 centuries after her death some Afghan women call themselves Daughters of Rabia"

"And, still, they write"

twitter.com/hatpinwoman/status/1427746815378694152?s=20

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ScreamingMeMe · 18/08/2021 17:17

The first woman I read about was Gawharshad Begum,a politically brilliant Empress of the Timurid Dynasty. She moved the dynasty capital to Herat&was integral in changing the empire’s architecture. The mausoleum in Herat is one of the historical buildings built under her guidance

She was known for generously patronising artists, philosophers, architects, musicians and poets, including female poet Mehri Herawi. While she wasn’t allowed to rule directly she installed her grandson as “puppet” king when her husband died&the kingdom benefited from her wisdom

Born into the royal family in the 9th century,there was a famous poet called Rabia Balkhi who is considered the first woman who wrote poems in modern Persia. She was influential&still is today. I found conflicting stories about who killed her but the consensus seems to be

That her brother,the king,had her killed for daring to fall in love with a slave and for writing poetry. Something women were not supposed to do.

As she died, she wrote this poem on the walls in her own blood which seems to me to be an act of the most astonishing courage

Twitter Thread: Afghan Women Through History
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ScreamingMeMe · 18/08/2021 17:18

(Copying and pasting as I understand twitter is weird at the moment with replies.)

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ScreamingMeMe · 18/08/2021 17:20

Another important woman was Queen Soraya Tarzi whose husband ruled 1919-1926. She was a fierce advocate for women’s rights and for girls to access education. She opened the first school for girls, &founded the first magazine for women, Ershad-I-Niswan.

Her husband campaigned against the veil and polygamy.

At a public function, he said "Islam does not require women to cover their bodies or wear any special kind of veil"

At the end of his speech, Queen Soraya tore off her veil and wives of other officials followed her example

Twitter Thread: Afghan Women Through History
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ScreamingMeMe · 18/08/2021 17:22

In echoes of the past,modern poet Nadiaa Anjuman was born in Herat in 1980.When the Taliban took over,at that time,she&other local women attended an underground school and literary circle, the Golden Needle Sewing School. Under the guise of learning to sew they learnt literature

She went on to publish a book of her poems, Gul-e-Dudi or Dark Flower but her husband is suspected of killing her, in part because she wrote poems about women’s subjugation.

This is one of her beautiful poems translated:

Twitter Thread: Afghan Women Through History
Twitter Thread: Afghan Women Through History
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ScreamingMeMe · 18/08/2021 17:24

Meena Keshwar Kamal was an Afghan revolutionary political activist, feminist, women's rights activist and founder of Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan (RAWA). She was assassinated in 1987.She founded RAWA to promote equality and education for women

and to "give voice to the deprived and silenced women of Afghanistan".

In 1979 she campaigned against the government.

In 1981, she launched a bilingual feminist magazine, Payam-e-Zan (Women's Message).

She also founded Watan Schools to aid refugee children&their mothers

Twitter Thread: Afghan Women Through History
Twitter Thread: Afghan Women Through History
Twitter Thread: Afghan Women Through History
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Briset · 18/08/2021 17:25

This is a lovely thread OP. I wish I could contribute but I don't know enough. I am looking forward to reading more!

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InJest · 18/08/2021 20:01

Agree this is a lovely thread OP. Also not able to contribute.

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PaleBlueMoonlight · 18/08/2021 20:57

So enlightening. Thank you

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2ndMrsdeWinter · 18/08/2021 21:32

This is a really inspiring thread, op. I am going to do my best to contribute something to it at some point over the next 24 hours. I’m also placemarking on the hope that I come back and there are more posts from other people more knowledgeable about Afghan women throughout history than myself

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thinkingaboutLangCleg · 23/08/2021 00:29

Fascinating and inspiring. Thank you, Screaming.

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