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Children's health

My son's mouth is crooked when he smiles

12 replies

newsoul · 24/11/2023 01:56

I recently noticed that my son (now almost 28 months old) has his bottom lip slanted to the side when he smiles. At first, I thought it was due to teething, but then I looked at photos of him as a baby and found out that he had this smile when he was about three months old, which left me very perplexed. a little worried.

My son's mouth is crooked when he smiles
OP posts:
Jimmyneutronsforehead · 24/11/2023 02:14

If you're worried speak to your doctor.

I have a crooked smile and my son does too. We are both autistic but I don't necessarily think it's related, although poor muscle form in the face can be linked to lots of things and equally nothing at all.

Fwiw I think your little boy has a very charming and characterful smile.

newsoul · 24/11/2023 03:30

Jimmyneutronsforehead · 24/11/2023 02:14

If you're worried speak to your doctor.

I have a crooked smile and my son does too. We are both autistic but I don't necessarily think it's related, although poor muscle form in the face can be linked to lots of things and equally nothing at all.

Fwiw I think your little boy has a very charming and characterful smile.

I will speak to the doctor when we are going to get vaccinated next week. 
Thanks for your responses!

OP posts:
SilverBranchGoldenPears · 24/11/2023 03:33

My daughter had this and we were referred to the orthodontist when she was 6/7. She then had overnight braces for about a year. Apparently her bottom jaw wasn’t sitting right. And then it was fine. She’s now 11 and her teeth/smile are perfect.

picturethispatsy · 24/11/2023 04:36

Have a look at Myofunctional Therapy.
There are loads of exercises online or you can find a therapist. He may be a bit young yet though for it.

newsoul · 24/11/2023 06:41

SilverBranchGoldenPears · 24/11/2023 03:33

My daughter had this and we were referred to the orthodontist when she was 6/7. She then had overnight braces for about a year. Apparently her bottom jaw wasn’t sitting right. And then it was fine. She’s now 11 and her teeth/smile are perfect.

But before he even had teeth he had a crooked smile. Anyway thanks for the message, I will also consult my dentist.

OP posts:
Swearwolf · 24/11/2023 08:06

Is he a thumb sucker? My youngest has sucked her teeth wonky! Always on the same side so it's a sideways wonk.

newsoul · 24/11/2023 08:53

Swearwolf · 24/11/2023 08:06

Is he a thumb sucker? My youngest has sucked her teeth wonky! Always on the same side so it's a sideways wonk.

He doesn't suck his thumb much. I read in a book that thumb sucking can be a way for babies to soothe themselves, so I bought some pacifiers and teethers when he was a few months old to help reduce his thumb sucking behavior.

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Swearwolf · 24/11/2023 09:37

That's good, with hindsight I wish I'd tried harder with a dummy!

kookit · 24/11/2023 12:31

Hi OP it looks a little similar to a condition my DD was born with called asymmetric crying facies - basically a long scary word for a harmless condition where the mouth muscle isn't quite working as it should, making the mouth slant (usually noticeable when crying or smiling) and often resolves itself although it can continue into child and adulthood. Obviously I'm no expert but it just reminded me of it. Found this too, it can be corrected with Botox if it is ACF:

"The clinical hallmark of asymmetric crying faciess (ACF) is a symmetric appearance of the oral aperture and lips at rest, but significant depression of one side of the lower lip with animation (crying or smiling). ACF can resolve spontaneously in the first year of life, but surgical intervention may be required at some point to ensure a good cosmetic outcome. The authors report on the successful use of botulinum toxin type AA to achieve temporary facial symmetry in two children with ACF with results lasting up to six months and suggest that such treatmentss_ may be helpful in providing more time to consider and/or plan surgical intervention."

newsoul · 26/11/2023 06:39

Maybe you can do something to distract him while he's about to suck his thumb.

OP posts:
newsoul · 26/11/2023 06:45

I also checked the relevant information about ACF, but I found that it is normal for my son to cry, and it only happens when he laughs or makes specific expressions.

OP posts:
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