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Would you describe Albert as quintessentially English?
20

RainCheckMate · 22/09/2022 15:10

Or do you think of it as German?

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squashyhat · 22/09/2022 15:24

Neither really. European certainly (Prince Albert of Monaco, QV's husband, Einstein). I can only think of Albert Finney who was English. Oh and Albert Pierrepoint the hangman Grin

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kuvira · 22/09/2022 15:32

When I think of Albert, the first one who comes to mind is Albert Camus, who was French. So neither, I guess? I'd say it's "Western" but not specific to a particular country.

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MrsAvocet · 22/09/2022 15:36

The first Albert that comes to my mind is Queen Victoria's husband who of course was German. I think it only became really popular in this country after their marriage, ( so I wouldn't say it was "quintessentially English" but then what is- Ethelred maybe? But I don't think it would be viewed as "foreign" either, as it's been widely used in the UK for getting on for 200 years now. It's a well established name in a number of European countries so I don't think it is a name with one nationality.

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MissHavishamsMouldyOldCake · 22/09/2022 15:39

Spans several countries I'd say, so I think it's European too.

There's 19th c Prince Albert and the icky Prince Albert from Monaco. Albert Camus of course. And Albert Einstein must surely feature very highly in lists of famous Alberts.

In terms of English Alberts I think more along the lines of Uncle Albert from Only Fools and Horses...

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Whataretheodds · 22/09/2022 15:42

No.

Albert waa highly popularised by (German) Prince Albert, so it's English in living/recent memory.

I don't have stats but i doubt usage was as widespread in England before the 1840s

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SheWoreYellow · 22/09/2022 15:43

I think British or English.

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CastleTower · 22/09/2022 17:08

Popularised in Britain only after Queen Victoria married Prince Albert.

Stats etc from before that are mentioned here:
www.britishbabynames.com/blog/2018/10/name-of-the-week-albert.html

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skyeisthelimit · 22/09/2022 17:18

The Queen's father was named Albert, so I tend to think of it as British/English, although obviously it was a name carried down through the family line.

Bertie is a nice nn for a little one, or I have known an Albie

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Pemba · 22/09/2022 17:23

Not particularly, it's more European as pps have said. Prince Albert was German of course, and there's lots of French 'Al-bair' s. (Their pronunciation).

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Hoppinggreen · 22/09/2022 17:23

I know a French Albert and a Chinese one.
Dont think I know an English one

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Sandysandwich · 22/09/2022 17:23

No I would think old fashioned and vaugely european

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YennefersDress · 22/09/2022 17:24

First one that comes to mind is Uncle Albert in OFAH

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ditalini · 22/09/2022 17:25

Bertie is very Victorian British, but Albert not especially so.

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SnoozyLucy7 · 22/09/2022 17:28

Not at all.

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Arnaquer · 22/09/2022 17:28

Albert Camus (French) was my first thought

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RainCheckMate · 22/09/2022 18:50

What about Albie?

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Vinylloving · 22/09/2022 18:52

I think of both

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Luredbyapomegranate · 24/09/2022 01:11

It’s French as well..

I don’t know if it was popular here before Queen Victoria married the German bloke. Victoria was certainly considered a v bizarre name.

Albie is only recently popular here so obviously not quintessentially British. Bertie is very Victorian, Alf is very early 20th century, and the world is now full of Alfies.

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TrashyPanda · 24/09/2022 09:40

Definitely not. And that applies to Albie too.


”John Bull” is the only “quintessentially English” name I can think of.

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HoratioNightboy · 24/09/2022 17:05

In a UK context I think of it as more English - was never as popular in Scotland where I am and would assume of English heritage if I ever met one (I never have). But in a wider context would class it as generally European.

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