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AIBU?

Is there anything my parents can do to protect my inheritance?

84 replies

userzH · 05/02/2024 22:59

I have another thread going but I wondered if anyone had any advice here.

When my parents pass away, it is highly likely that I will inherit a large some of money.

I am currently trying to divorce my abusive ex husband who is refusing to engage in any financial settlement. He doesn't want to cut financial ties between us.

Whilst we have nothing to sort financially, I need to protect myself from him in the future.

If it isn't going to be possible to get any sort of financial order from my ex husband, is there anything my parents could do to protect their inheritance should he try make a claim against me when after they've passed away?

This is awful talk about but it's worrying for my parents. They hate the idea of their money potentially ending up in his pocket.

OP posts:
Throwawayme · 05/02/2024 23:01

In your other post, you were advised it's unlikely any inheritance would be taken into account. Sorry you're feeling so stressed out. If you can't afford legal advice, could your parents help you with that cost?

BathTangle · 05/02/2024 23:03

My grandparents put my uncle's share of their money into a trust, and it was only released to my uncle after he was divorced. However I don't know if his ex could have claimed on this later (she didn't). Might be worth investigating?

Scrapper142 · 05/02/2024 23:13

An extreme solution...

Do they have access to cash or is it tied up in property? Could they/you pay him off to go away quietly and quickly as part of the divorce. Would that encourage him to speed up and fuck off? Obviously make it all legally binding and make sure he has no further claim.

While it would be a bitter taste to pay him more than he may deserve or is entitled to in the long term it may be better so you can move on. May save years of worry for you all if the alternative is a lengthy divorce.

justasking111 · 05/02/2024 23:16

Your parents should seek legal advice if you can't afford it

DNLove · 05/02/2024 23:18

Have you children? Could it be put in trust for them?

VelvetandLace · 05/02/2024 23:25

Once you are divorced he can’t claim on your inheritance as it is not a current asset.

skysmumm · 05/02/2024 23:26

VelvetandLace · 05/02/2024 23:25

Once you are divorced he can’t claim on your inheritance as it is not a current asset.

He can! Happened to a friend of mine. Unless you have a financial order in place. My friend had a quicky divorce and didn't even think about it!

skysmumm · 05/02/2024 23:27

Can they buy loads of gold/diamonds and leave them to you?

TeaKitten · 05/02/2024 23:27

VelvetandLace · 05/02/2024 23:25

Once you are divorced he can’t claim on your inheritance as it is not a current asset.

He can, that’s why you have to get a separate financial break.

userzH · 05/02/2024 23:30

VelvetandLace · 05/02/2024 23:25

Once you are divorced he can’t claim on your inheritance as it is not a current asset.

He can. We have no current assets to sort out. I need to protect myself in the future.

OP posts:
Whatwereyouthinking · 05/02/2024 23:32

Put it in a trust for the benefit of you and any children - should protect it but depends if it’s enough money to be worth the cost / hassle of a trust

saltinesandcoffeecups · 05/02/2024 23:35

userzH · 05/02/2024 23:30

He can. We have no current assets to sort out. I need to protect myself in the future.

I have no idea about the back story, your divorce laws, or your inheritance laws…. But if you are worried about this you need to talk to you parents about consulting a lawyer/solicitor.


The free advice you get from randos on the internet will be worth exactly what you paid for it (spoiler alert… nothing).

Bemyclementine · 05/02/2024 23:38

Go through tge process either the divorce abd financial settlement. If there's no assets, you can ask the court to decide. It will cost you but less than him claiming your inheritance.

MooseBeTimeForSnow · 05/02/2024 23:38

Who issued the petition? You or him?

If you AND he’s keen to remarry - hold off applying for the final order/absolute until he’s signed a Clean Break Order.

If it was him AND he wants to remarry, then let him crack on. Once he is remarried he loses the right to make any future claim.

Everythingtastesbetterwithcheese · 05/02/2024 23:38

See a solicitor, although he won't engage you can apply to the court for a clean break anyway. It won't be as cheap or as straightforward than if he was cooperative but I don't think he can stop you doing it

Flickersy · 05/02/2024 23:39

The only advice you should be taking is from a qualified solicitor.

Call one tomorrow.

userzH · 05/02/2024 23:50

I have a solicitor. I am getting legal aid however all their responses are so long and unclear in what they actually mean.

OP posts:
ShadowPlaying · 06/02/2024 09:42

You need to get your solicitor to clarify. That's what they are being paid for.

Your parents should also consult an accountant or solicitor to discuss various options.

MarnieMarnie · 06/02/2024 09:47

This reply has been deleted

This has been deleted by MNHQ for breaking our Talk Guidelines - previously banned poster.

MamaAlwaysknowsbest · 06/02/2024 09:47

How can he claim your own money even if you don't get divorced. Many married people here said their spouse got money inherited and locked it away in a separate bank account

GasPanic · 06/02/2024 10:21

One of the points of engaging legal help is that they are supposed to translate legalese into a language you understand (and what you want doing into legalese).

You need to get them to clarify what they have told you.

IvorTheEngineDriver · 06/02/2024 10:26

Put your inheritance in trust.

Idontjetwashthefucker · 06/02/2024 10:27

You had some fantastic advice on your other thread, why start another? Are you going to take any of the advice given?

Codlingmoths · 06/02/2024 10:29

If I were your parents I’d pay a lawyer to push a financial break through so you were done with this man.

mitogoshi · 06/02/2024 10:34

You can force a financial order through, judges take a dim view of stalling and can see through cases where the ex wants to inherit!

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