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AIBU?

AIBU - Successful Interview & Salary Negotiation

201 replies

Newjob2024 · 02/02/2024 09:36

I applied for a job a few weeks ago and put on the job application what my current salary was. The recruitment consultant called me the following week and I was very honest that, since applying, I have been offered an internal promotion at work. She assured me that the salary was negotiable and that the Company were keen to meet with me.

I have subsequently had an informal chat with the MD and 2 interviews. I was offered the job this morning but the recruitment consultant said that, before they put an offer in writing, they want to know what my current salary is (basic + bonus) so they know what to offer. I went back and explained that I wouldn't be looking to move for the same as I would see this as a step up in my career. She then indicated that there wouldn't be any wriggle room in the salary range.

For context, the job offer was advertised as £40-£50k and I was seeking £54k. AIBU to have expected some salary negotiations when I raised this at the start and was told there would be room for negotiations? Does anyone have any tips on how I could professionally go back to not give my current salary away, as in my view it is irrelevant (and is very clear I am not on a lot less as I have all the skills and experience to do the role).

TIA :)

OP posts:
Moreorlessmentallystable · 02/02/2024 09:45

Well you already disclosed your current salary, with the recruiter,so how can you go back and not give your salary?

LadyDanburysHat · 02/02/2024 09:49

I hate when job's ask your current salary so they can offer you £1k more and seem like they are doing you a favour.

If I am going to leave a job and learn new systems etc. I am looking for 10% to make it worth my time.

LoobyDop · 02/02/2024 09:52

Can’t you just repeat on a loop what the offer would need to be for you to accept it? Either they’re prepared to pay that, or they aren’t. Be prepared to walk away, though. I think there is genuinely a bias against women who are firm in salary negotiations. We’re expected to be so dazzled that someone wants us that we take whatever is on offer.

Newjob2024 · 02/02/2024 10:02

@Moreorlessmentallystable, sorry for the confusion - I meant that I disclosed my previous salary before the internal promotion.

@LadyDanburysHat and @LoobyDop I fully agree! The recruitment consultant was like, oh they might match it! Urm no, I am not loosing job security, the right to redundancy etc. for the same money!

I will just stick to my guns and see if it goes anywhere. I would perhaps accept for £52k but not less.

OP posts:
LonginesPrime · 02/02/2024 10:06

before they put an offer in writing, they want to know what my current salary is (basic + bonus) so they know what to offer

Well, if there is a minimum salary you'd need them to offer for you to make the move, I think it's reasonable to state "my current salary is x. However, I have been offered an internal promotion that will bring it up to y. So in order for me to be able to accept this role, I would need a salary of z."

Obviously, there's a risk they'll say no (especially since someone might already have clocked the original current salary you disclosed), so if you definitely want to take job, you might want to appear a bit more flexible. I'd definitely mention the internal promotion though, as that obviously changes your salary expectations.

I would also tell the recruiter that you understood from your discussion on [date] that there was scope for negotiation on salary, so the recruiter knows they need to communicate with the company and not simply push back with you to accept whatever they offer.

Newjob2024 · 02/02/2024 10:15

Thank you @LonginesPrime . I guess the problem with disclosing my current salary is that I am still looking for a considerable increase to make the move worthwhile. I just feel if I give them my current salary, they are going to match it rather than exceed it. We shall see! I will be flexible but it's like they don't want to put their cards on the table and actually make me an offer so I can counter it!

OP posts:
bookwormcrazy · 02/02/2024 10:19

To be honest, there is no reason a company should be asking for your current salary and if they insist I would walk away.

They should be looking to pay you what you are worth to them, not just give you a % increase on your current salary.

anniegun · 02/02/2024 10:19

Just tell the recruiter what you earn and what you will move for. Its not rocket science

Moreorlessmentallystable · 02/02/2024 10:21

Newjob2024 · 02/02/2024 10:02

@Moreorlessmentallystable, sorry for the confusion - I meant that I disclosed my previous salary before the internal promotion.

@LadyDanburysHat and @LoobyDop I fully agree! The recruitment consultant was like, oh they might match it! Urm no, I am not loosing job security, the right to redundancy etc. for the same money!

I will just stick to my guns and see if it goes anywhere. I would perhaps accept for £52k but not less.

You can then say you'd rather not disclose exact figures as you are still negotiating. Give them the figure you want for the new job and that's it.

Appleblum · 02/02/2024 10:23

Don't think you're losing out on anything here by disclosing your salary. If they come back with a figure you're not happy with then you can reject the offer.

CinderellaMum · 02/02/2024 10:25

To the recruiter:

While my current salary is one factor, I believe it's important to focus on the value and skills I bring to the role. I am targeting a salary of £x, considering the responsibilities and expectations of this position.

ToWonderWhyIBother · 02/02/2024 10:26

The company if they have used a recruitment consultant will be factoring in the fee that the consultant will be charging and on your salary scale that won't be a small number. The member of staff we have just hired on a similar salary was 25% of the offered salary (it made my eyes water paying that invoice).

Could you call the company direct and have a negotiation with them off the table so to speak, that would mean trusting them to keep their word as it's not on paper but surely it's worth a try.

It really all depends on how much you want the position.

Newjob2024 · 02/02/2024 10:26

Thank you all. @bookwormcrazy exactly, it is what they want to pay, not what my current company pay me!

OP posts:
AIstolemylunch · 02/02/2024 10:26

what is the best way to handle this question initially? I find it really annoying for some reason when the recruiter asks this as as pp says its a ploy so that they only end up offering the bear minimum and recruiter maximises commissio. Can you say 'if rather not say' or 'market rate'?

bookwormcrazy · 02/02/2024 10:28

CinderellaMum · 02/02/2024 10:25

To the recruiter:

While my current salary is one factor, I believe it's important to focus on the value and skills I bring to the role. I am targeting a salary of £x, considering the responsibilities and expectations of this position.

Exactly this.

Newjob2024 · 02/02/2024 10:40

@CinderellaMum , that is perfect, thank you so much!

OP posts:
Newjob2024 · 02/02/2024 13:42

I've set out my expectations so just waiting for a reply 😬

OP posts:
PlanBea · 02/02/2024 13:58

Some wording I thought was good was "I'm currently interviewing for roles in the region of (eg £55-65k). I can be flexible depending on the benefits package but I would be expecting this role to be comparative to similar jobs in the market". Good luck!

FearMe · 03/02/2024 16:49

Just lie and give them a figure that you would consider suitable in order to secure the rise you want.

Ndhdiwntbsivnwg · 03/02/2024 17:35

Tell them you earn 60k 😂

NotARealWookiie · 03/02/2024 18:44

Well done. I always think the current salary is none of the new companies business. I think you just have to go back and say “in order for me to be in a position to accept, I’d be looking for a package with a £54k salary”

CKL987 · 03/02/2024 19:13

Your current salary has nothing to do with them. If they want to hire you then they need to pay what they pay. Looking at existing salary creates all sorts of issues, the biggest in my opinion being the risk of gender pay problems moving between businesses.

Foxblue · 03/02/2024 19:20

Can I hijack this thread and ask a very silly question in general: when they ask for current salary, what's stopping anyone from adding a few ££ on? Like, if I was on 40, could I just say I was on 45k looking for 50?

Acatdance · 03/02/2024 19:23

Foxblue · 03/02/2024 19:20

Can I hijack this thread and ask a very silly question in general: when they ask for current salary, what's stopping anyone from adding a few ££ on? Like, if I was on 40, could I just say I was on 45k looking for 50?

You have to provide your P45 to your new employer which might give the game away!

SundayFundayz · 03/02/2024 19:24

As an HR person this makes me so annoyed.
They should have benchmarked the role and should be prepared to pay what they have decided is fair, rather than anything to do with someone’s previous salary. This is what stops the gender pay gap improving, as women tend to be more honest and set lower expectations (big generalisation I know, but lots of studies to back that up!)

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