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AIBU?

To ask what alternative job I could do for a similar salary

114 replies

Hunetp · 04/01/2024 20:02

I work in law and earn 70k. I’m so fed up of it but as a single parent the money is needed. My mortgage is 950 and I’ve no way of cutting this back and if I was renting I’d be paying even more.

I feel like I have no options as I’m not qualified in anything else. I hate the culture and the arrogance and, being honest, the men! Mostly (not all) very difficult to work with. I’ve only been back a year since maternity leave. I suspect I am paid less than most men there too, I’m already 37 so feel like I’m on the back foot financially and would rather be on the back foot but doing a job I don’t despise the environment. Do I just have to suck it up? I am not skilled in anything else sadly and looking online tonight it doesn’t seem I would get any other work.

OP posts:
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211 votes. Final results.

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1stTimeMummy2021 · 07/01/2024 10:08

@Hunetp My brother changed to being an in house lawyer at a bank, he earns so much more money and does so many less hours. It really changed his life for the better. I hope you are able to do something similar.

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Verbena17 · 07/01/2024 10:15

Luckyduc · 07/01/2024 08:11

Abit of a daft question when there's not many jobs out there that pay anything like 70k.....or unless you can be a dr/surgeon or geologist on the rigs ....but the tiny amount of small jobs that pay this or higher you would need to go back to uni and get get degree in and start again.

Personally think, you've got a law degree which is impressive, you earn far more than most people's combined salary even when married....you are independent financially which can't get any better and the money will definitely give your child a great life. I know one single parent lawyer and she whisks her kid away on 10 holidays a year from disbeyworkd to lapland to Maldives. Just suck it up. Maybe think about moving away from the area you live and work . Alot of cheaper options further north you go.

Not sure this is true. There seems to be plenty of jobs out there for 70k.
Experienced doctors and surgeons are earning WAY more than 70k, that’s for sure!

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Caggers · 07/01/2024 11:28

Luckyduc · 07/01/2024 08:11

Abit of a daft question when there's not many jobs out there that pay anything like 70k.....or unless you can be a dr/surgeon or geologist on the rigs ....but the tiny amount of small jobs that pay this or higher you would need to go back to uni and get get degree in and start again.

Personally think, you've got a law degree which is impressive, you earn far more than most people's combined salary even when married....you are independent financially which can't get any better and the money will definitely give your child a great life. I know one single parent lawyer and she whisks her kid away on 10 holidays a year from disbeyworkd to lapland to Maldives. Just suck it up. Maybe think about moving away from the area you live and work . Alot of cheaper options further north you go.

There are plenty of jobs paying over £70k.

Out of my friends, I think very, very few are likely to be earning less than this.

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Lillanbjornen · 07/01/2024 12:33

BadgerFace · 07/01/2024 06:46

If you love practising law but just hate the culture you are in try a different firm. In house, as others have suggested, is a good options or there are progressive culture firms out there, you just have to find them. Lionshead Law and Stephensons Law are two to look at to see if they offer 100% remote as they are not local to you but are female led and doing things differently.

That said, unless you are 5+ years in you will most likely progress/learn quicker in a hybrid environment in which case search for lawyers/firms who are passionate about diversity and champion flexibility. They are likely to be less male dominant and the right culture can make all the difference.

I jumped out of my 17 year career at partner level after my second baby when I felt I was being treated badly and I knew the culture where I was would never change. I landed in a great place who value flexibility and I’ve been able to do loads of things I never would have been able to in my previous role (like shape the D&I policies for 700 people!).

Don’t give up law if it’s your passion, you have worked hard to get this far. Find your people in it.

Stephensons doesn’t exist anymore - they moved across to a unregulated entity called Plume. Although for all the marketing hype about how different they are, there are a few stories out about it being an equally toxic place to work!

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BadgerFace · 07/01/2024 12:44

Lillanbjornen · 07/01/2024 12:33

Stephensons doesn’t exist anymore - they moved across to a unregulated entity called Plume. Although for all the marketing hype about how different they are, there are a few stories out about it being an equally toxic place to work!

Oh interesting and how disappointing! I’m sure there are different firms out there with progressive leaders though if OP wants to stay in law but might be some work to find the gems.

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Lillanbjornen · 07/01/2024 12:47

DuckDuckHiccup · 06/01/2024 23:27

Reading this message made me burst into tears. I am in the exact same position as OP and seeing all these other career options has felt like a massive relief. Sorry to piggy back onto this post, but would you have any idea how I could get into these other areas of a law firm? I think I would love to work on strategy but wouldn’t know where to start getting a job in that area. Are there additional qualification (over and above my law degree) that I could do?

Ease of doing it will partly depend on where you are - lots of opportunity in London, still entirely achievable but fewer options in other major cities, Birmingham, Manchester, Bristol, Leeds, Edinburgh! If you’re not in commuting distance of London, I’d start with looking at the larger national / international firms that have regional offices across the UK and the types of roles they’re advertising under their business services vacancies so you can get a sense of titles / roles / job spec and responsibilities. Lots of it is transferable skills and there’s a strong preference for candidates who have worked in professional services and a partnership model, so plenty of legal experience is very helpful. Once you have a sense of what you might want to do, I’d get in touch with Totum Recruitment, they’re specialists at placing business services roles in law firms and have people that focus on all different aspects, they’ll be able to support you on adapting CV and interview etc.

Honestly, I know a lot of lawyers who have been down this path, it’s well-trodden in the industry, and nobody did any additional qualifications to make the move, more of an optional choice later. I did law as my undergrad but never did a TC, and 15 years into my career don’t have any further qualifications at all - I turned up as an assistant in my early 20s and worked my way up. I’ve got friends who shifted on qualification and so were reasonably junior in their new roles, but I also know people who held out until senior associate and then went straight in as “Head of”!

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Bellyblueboy · 07/01/2024 12:48

Luckyduc · 07/01/2024 08:11

Abit of a daft question when there's not many jobs out there that pay anything like 70k.....or unless you can be a dr/surgeon or geologist on the rigs ....but the tiny amount of small jobs that pay this or higher you would need to go back to uni and get get degree in and start again.

Personally think, you've got a law degree which is impressive, you earn far more than most people's combined salary even when married....you are independent financially which can't get any better and the money will definitely give your child a great life. I know one single parent lawyer and she whisks her kid away on 10 holidays a year from disbeyworkd to lapland to Maldives. Just suck it up. Maybe think about moving away from the area you live and work . Alot of cheaper options further north you go.

I don’t think you really know what you are talking about. There are loads more roles that medical and oil rigs that pay this type of salary - and much higher!!

A qualified lawyer can make lateral moves into similar fields and doesn’t need to go back to basics.

OP talk to a recruitment consultant. They will give you lots of options. Don’t listen to this type of uninformed advice.

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Badgerandfox227 · 07/01/2024 12:52

Completely agree to in house for an insurance company. They have lots of family and female friendly policies in place these days, although you do still have to push them to follow through. Many firms are also now hybrid as a minimum.

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SirQuintusAurieliusMaximus · 07/01/2024 13:22

Something else I've thought of is sort of tangetial jobs - so things like (sorry this is a bit vague) training roles (big LLP firms usually have people who head up their internal training departments and organise it, and I know a couple who are former solicitors); marketing or practice management (there are a few solicitors who moved into barristers chambers practice management/marketing roles).

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Fifteenth · 07/01/2024 13:28

Difficult. Law is exceptionally highly paid.

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DuckDuckHiccup · 07/01/2024 22:14

Thank you so much for this! I’m 7PQE in a London form so hopefully something will come up!

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Lillanbjornen · 07/01/2024 22:46

DuckDuckHiccup · 07/01/2024 22:14

Thank you so much for this! I’m 7PQE in a London form so hopefully something will come up!

Ah, easier location and a decent time in your career in that you’ll have loads of transferable skills! Linklaters definitely have a standalone strategy / strategic projects team; you could also consider Legal Project Management which looks at applying project management practices to large matters - a lot of specs will mention qualifications but I know people who have done it without, current roles advertised on LinkedIn at Simmons and White & Case if you want to read through a job spec; Osborne Clarke have a Legal Operations role which is about creating internal solutions that supports the firm’s development. Firms are so big and so complex now, there are SO many different types of roles out there - definitely have a dig around and work out the sorts of things that might interest you and speak to a recruiter about how to make a move!

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Whatstheword21 · 08/01/2024 00:16

Look at Financial services roles - risk, compliance, procurement. All excellent roles for someone with a law background and all very well paid.

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Jeevesnotwooster · 09/01/2024 07:41

Another ex city lawyer here (was partner). I now work in house for a branch of the civil service in Scotland. Dual qualified and covering literally all aspects of law. It's not brilliantly paid (but more than £70k) but much more family friendly and so much more interesting. Not sure any amount of money would tempt me back into private practice.

To OP (and others) I would suggest just get out there and start applying to any in house or civil service jobs where you might be able to meet the minimum requirements. Good people will always find something

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