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Will ‘The Body Keeps Score’ panic me if I read it?
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Pebblex · 21/01/2022 11:42

If the body does keep score, does the book outline that there is a way to negate the past?

Or is its message that if we’ve been through crap then essentially are we all fooked?

The book interests me but I’m also worried too in case it implies there’s no hope!

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Jellycatspyjamas · 21/01/2022 12:35

It’s a really good book in terms of understanding trauma, but quite technical in terms of neuroscience. It gives good suggestions for recovery and won’t tell you you’re fucked forever. Yep other books we’ll worth reading are Trauma and Recovery by Judith Herman and What Doesn’t Kill you by Stephen Joseph. The second book is very readable, has good exercises to help recovery and is focussed on growth following trauma, so definitely not a “you’re fucked forever” type book.

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WhoAteAllTheDinosaurs · 21/01/2022 13:41

Also have a look at Carolyn Spring's website including her blog articles. Very informative and easier to digest than The Body Keeps The Score, which is great, but as PP said, quite technical.

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Pebblex · 21/01/2022 14:10

Thank you! Smile

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tricerotops · 23/01/2022 11:41

I think that how you personally respond to things and see recovery will impact who you respond well to.

I think that the author of Body Keeps Score is very positive, forward looking and solution focused, and that what he says and writes is aimed at recovery, even recovery in difficult circumstances, so I find him very inspiring. I also think that understanding the neuroscience is pretty key and makes recovery easier, and though these concepts may be seen as technical, the author is a good communicator, and explains the concepts in layman language. If they are new concepts it takes a bit of time to get your head around it, but it is not difficult with a bit of perseverance and worth it.

I think that reading some of the other replies here, as I say I think it might be a personal thing, as I find Judith Herman good at empathising with and talking around problems, but not as solutions focused.

I have used EFT tapping to help process things, by the way, and have found it really effective. I have also heard good things about EMDR therapy.

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MrsKDB · 23/01/2022 11:42

It’s a brilliant book. Lots of hope and positivity

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Jellycatspyjamas · 23/01/2022 11:54

That’s interesting @tricerotops, I like that Herman emphasises the importance of safety in trauma recovery from a physical, psychological and emotional point of view before trying to process trauma. She comes from a relational approach, which some people really need before they can look at problem solving, her 3 stage model is used consistently in trauma work and certainly is the underpinning theory in local NHS provision. I think she explains well the concept of complex trauma and helps explain why different people need different approaches to recovery.

I like Van Der Kolk a lot and agree he’s very positive and solution focussed, but I also like the relationship based work of Herman.

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Tempusfudgeit · 23/01/2022 12:15

My sister read it and immediately decided her MS was caused by our parents breaking up when we were children. Not helpful!

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tricerotops · 23/01/2022 18:28

jellycatspyjamas
I like that Herman emphasises the importance of safety in trauma recovery from a physical, psychological and emotional point of view before trying to process trauma.....her 3 stage model is used consistently in trauma work her first stage is stabilisation ie managing triggers etc whereas the work of Kolk and neuroscientists look at the stages before this, I think, assessing it from a neuro point of view, looking at where the brain has been affected and aiming recovery at the right part of the brain. Stabilisation/talking therapies come a bit further down the line as necessary. The way I see it is that her ideas are good around talking therapy but talking therapies are not always the right thing at the start, and for some not at all, and other types of therapy can be more effective for many people. Most people I know who have recovered from trauma have not undertaken talking therapeutic work. The people I do know who are involved in talking therapeutic work see it as a life long commitment and they say it is very slow progress. So there are significant differences in their approaches. As you say, the way to recovery will depend on the person.

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FFSFFSFFS · 23/01/2022 18:31

Nope it’s positive and constructive!

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tricerotops · 23/01/2022 18:32

@Tempusfudgeit

My sister read it and immediately decided her MS was caused by our parents breaking up when we were children. Not helpful!

This is not about MS or your sister, but the physiological effects of stress, anxiety and other emotions can be very severe.
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DaisyTheUnicorn · 23/01/2022 18:33

I had some trauma therapy but felt it stopped before it started. I am now through iapt being offered 6 + 16 sessions (wasn't clear if it was with the same person) which they said is their maximum they offer.

I think its so hard to access help in the nhs.

I have had trauma keeps the score for a year now. Fully agree with the premise but similar feeling about readingnit. I can see the toll it has on my body, I dont want to just reinforce how fucked up it is due to childhood trauma.

I have also bought another book about thriving thay looks good. But its a year later and I haven't started! Maybe q
We could read and discuss together.

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AwkwardSquad · 23/01/2022 18:33

I would agree that it’s positive and constructive, but be aware that it includes some very difficult to read case studies.

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comeondover · 23/01/2022 18:50

I think it's brilliant and it does definitely talk about what's necessary for recovery and different approaches to do so. Also I wanted to add that the narrator on the audiobook is brilliant in case anyone's considering that.

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NatriumChloride · 23/01/2022 19:03

Reading this now, and it is excellent OP. Very positive and forward thinking. Some of the case histories are harrowing, but the author also shows how different types of therapies can be used to help these people. I’d give it a go, OP. It’s fantastic.

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DaisyTheUnicorn · 23/01/2022 19:04

Ah yes that was partly my fear ... costly therapy needed to recover.

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