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How can I help 5 year old DS to write

(10 Posts)
Peanuts33 Mon 27-Jun-11 18:29:23

DS is coming to the end of reception and he still can't write or hold a pencil properly. He has hypermobility and this is almost certainly the reason. I went to see his reception teacher the other day and she said that she is really pleased with his progress in every other way, i.e. he knows all his sounds and letters, his reading is fantastic and he picks up everything really quickly. However, she said that she is a bit concerned as he cant write anything legible at all and they are going to be starting cursive writing in year 1 and she doesnt want him to get left behind.

I know it is a longshot but did anyone else have a child with similar issues and what did you do about it?

I am willing to get him some outside help but I dont know in what form. A private tutor wont help I dont think as they wouldnt do anything his reception teacher isnt doing. Do I need a private physio to strengthen his joints? Or maybe I need to get a special needs tutor who might have some knowledge of helping children to write.

He has seen an OT who has suggested thicker pencils or pencil grips. Neither of these have helped. Somebody has suggested getting every different type of pencil aid available and just keep trying until we find one that works but I dont know where to find different kinds of pencil aids.

ElbowFan Mon 27-Jun-11 19:36:50

I don't know if this is helpful but - does he draw? Can he make marks to represent Mummy/Daddy/pet cat/dog...whatever?
How is he about getting hands dirty and doing hand prints or finger splodges?
Does he want to write or draw anything?
What do you write? Does he see you with a pencil?
My DS (long time ago now) was a late writer because he had no interest in writing his name or any of the the things which children start off with. Drawing gave him the fine motor skills so at least he had the necessary physical skills to enable him to write when he eventually decided to.
All I can suggest is that you don't make it seem like a big deal otherwise he may be put of completely. End of Reception is still a very small boy!

Peanuts33 Mon 27-Jun-11 20:05:20

Thank you for your reply ElbowFan. No unfortunately he can't really draw either. He doesnt like doing anything that involves holding a pencil so getting him to practice is a bit of a nightmare.

He does see us write and also his older brother but unfortunatley he has already starting saying that he is the only one in his class that needs extra help with his writing so his confidence is getting knocked already. His teacher has said that this is by no means the case and that there are others that need extra help too but DS thinks it is only him.

mrz Mon 27-Jun-11 20:09:12

Hand Activities
Level 1
Ball squeeze
Hold a soft ball in the palm of the writing hand. Cup fingers and thumb securely around and squeeze (thumb touching ring finger if possible) hold grip for a count of 15 seconds build up to 30, 45 and 1 minute.
Creepy crawlies
Use tissue then normal paper strips
Place forearm of dominant hand on a table using the fingers of the dominant hand scrunch paper into the hand (hand cupped over the paper feeding it into cupped hand) rotate the forearm when crunching paper and use thumb to make as small as possible. Repeat 2, 3 then 5 times.

mrz Mon 27-Jun-11 20:09:59

Level 2
Playdough pinching
Role playdough with two hands until about 20 cm long. Pinch playdough with thumb and index finger of the dominant hand. Then conduct snake into cave.
Snake in the cave
Place wrist and forearm on the table, place hand over playdough. With thumb (keeping wrist still) gather up the playdough into the palm of the hand. Keep wrist and forearm on the table and make an arch with the hand to hide the dough under the palm. Repeat twice.
Level 3
Sticky tape escape
Place a piece of sticky tape around the index and middle finger of the dominant hand. With the thumb of the same hand try to get the tape off. Don’t use the other hand!
Finger wrestling
Use thumb and index finger (best done with a partner) interlock finger and thumb try to escape. The winner is the one who holds on the longest. Have 5 attempts.

Scholes34 Tue 28-Jun-11 14:04:39

Our nursery teacher always maintained it was important to spend time on gross motor skills first. Get him out climbing trees, etc in the summer and just generally being active. Use large pieces of paper and don't worry about the size of what he's producing.

sarahfreck Tue 28-Jun-11 14:07:34

"A private tutor wont help I dont think as they wouldnt do anything his reception teacher isnt doing. Do I need a private physio to strengthen his joints? Or maybe I need to get a special needs tutor who might have some knowledge of helping children to write."

They are few and far between, but sometimes you can find paediatric OT's who work privately and will do weekly sessions. If you can find someone, I would highly recommend it as I have seen what a difference it can make. BTW iti s great that you have picked up the hypermobility issues so early as these can often not be spotted till later when lots of problems have set in.

mrz Tue 28-Jun-11 16:57:22

Things to remember:

Upright working surfaces promote fine motor skills. Examples of these are: vertical chalkboards; easels for painting; flannel boards; lite bright; magnet boards (or fridge); windows and mirrors; white boards, etc. Children can also make sticker pictures; do rubber ink-stamping; use reuseable stickers to make pictures; complete puzzles with thick knobs; use magna-doodle and etch-a-sketch as well. The benefits for these include: having the child's wrist positioned to develop good thumb movements; they help develop good fine motor muscles; the child is using the arm and shoulder muscles.
Fine Motor Activities
Moulding and rolling play dough into balls - using the palms of the hands facing each other and with fingers curled slightly towards the palm.
Rolling play dough into tiny balls (peas) using only the finger tips.
Using pegs or toothpicks to make designs in play dough.
Cutting play dough with a plastic knife or with a pizza wheel by holding the implement in a diagonal volar grasp.
Tearing newspaper into strips and then crumpling them into balls. Use to stuff scarecrow or other art creation.
Scrunching up 1 sheet of newspaper in one hand. This is a super strength builder.
Using a plant sprayer to spray plants, (indoors, outdoors) to spray snow (mix food colouring with water so that the snow can be painted), or melt "monsters". (Draw monster pictures with markers and the colours will run when sprayed.)
Picking up objects using large tweezers such as those found in the "Bedbugs" game. This can be adapted by picking up Cheerios, small cubes, small marshmallows, pennies, etc., in counting games.
Shaking dice by cupping the hands together, forming an empty air space between the palms.
Using small-sized screwdrivers like those found in an erector set.
Lacing and sewing activities such as stringing beads, Cheerios, macaroni, etc.
Using eye droppers to "pick up" coloured water for colour mixing or to make artistic designs on paper.
Rolling small balls out of tissue paper, then gluing the balls onto construction paper to form pictures or designs.
Turning over cards, coins, checkers, or buttons, without bringing them to the edge of the table.
Making pictures using stickers or self-sticking paper reinforcements.
Playing games with the "puppet fingers" -the thumb, index, and middle fingers. At circle time have each child's puppet fingers tell about what happened over the weekend, or use them in songs and finger plays.

Place a variety of forms (eg. blocks, felt, paper, string, yarn, cereal, cotton) on outlines
Match shapes, colour, or pictures to a page and paste them within the outlines

Self-Care Skills
Buttoning
Lacing
Tying
Fastening Snaps
Zipping
Carrying
Using a screwdriver
Locking and unlocking a door
Winding a clock
Opening and closing jars
Rolling out dough or other simple cooking activities
Washing plastic dishes
Sweeping the floor
Dressing
Scissor Activities
When scissors are held correctly, and when they fit a child's hand well, cutting activities will exercise the very same muscles which are needed to manipulate a pencil in a mature tripod grasp. The correct scissor position is with the thumb and middle finger in the handles of the scissors, the index finger on the outside of the handle to stabilize, with fingers four and five curled into the palm.
Cutting junk mail, particularly the kind of paper used in magazine subscription cards.
Making fringe on the edge of a piece of construction paper.
Cutting play dough or clay with scissors.
Cutting straws or shredded paper.
Cutting
Use a thick black line to guide cutting the following:
A fringe from a piece of paper
Cut off corners of a piece of paper
Cut along curved lines
Cut lines with a variety of angles
Cut figures with curves and angles

Sensory Activities
The following activities ought to be done frequently to increase postural muscle strength and endurance. These activities also strengthen the child's awareness of his/her hands.
Wheelbarrow walking, crab walking
Clapping games (loud/quiet, on knees together, etc.)
Catching (clapping) bubbles between hands
Pulling off pieces of thera-putty with individual fingers and thumb
Drawing in a tactile medium such as wet sand, salt, rice, or "goop". Make "goop" by adding water to cornstarch until you have a mixture similar in consistency to toothpaste. The "drag" of this mixture provides feedback to the muscle and joint receptors, thus facilitating visual motor control.
Picking out small objects like pegs, beads, coins, etc., from a tray of salt, sand, rice, or putty. Try it with eyes closed too. This helps develop sensory awareness in the hands.

Midline Crossing
Establishment of hand dominance is still developing at this point. The following activities will facilitate midline crossing:
Encourage reaching across the body for materials with each hand. It may be necessary to engage the other hand in an activity to prevent switching hands at midline.
Refrain specifically from discouraging a child from using the left hand for any activity. Allow for the natural development of hand dominance by presenting activities at midline, and allowing the child to choose freely.
Start making the child aware of the left and right sides of his body through spontaneous comments like, "kick the ball with your right leg." Play imitation posture games like "Simon Says" with across the body movements.
When painting at easel, encourage the child to paint a continuous line across the entire paper- also from diagonal to diagonal.




Activities To Develop Handwriting Skills
There are significant prerequisites for printing skills that begin in infancy and continue to emerge through the preschool years. The following activities support and promote fine motor and visual motor development:
Body Stability
The joints of the body need to be stable before the hands can be free to focus on specific skilled fine motor tasks.
Wheelbarrow walking, crab walking, and wall push-ups.
Toys: Orbiter, silly putty, and monkey bars on the playground.

Fine Motor Skills
When a certain amount of body stability has developed, the hands and fingers begin to work on movements of dexterity and isolation as well as different kinds of grasps. Children will develop fine motor skills best when they work on a VERTICAL or near vertical surface as much as possible. In particular, the wrist must be in extension. (Bent back in the direction of the hand)
Attach a large piece of drawing paper to the wall. Have the child use a large marker and try the following exercises to develop visual motor skills:Make an outline of a one at a time. Have the child trace over your line from left to right, or from top to bottom. Trace each figure at least 10 times . Then have the child draw the figure next to your model several times.
Play connect the dots. Again make sure the child's strokes connect dots fromleft to right, and from top to bottom.
Trace around stencils - the non-dominant hand should hold the stencil flat and stable against the paper, while the dominant hand pushes the pencil firmly against the edge of the stencil. The stencil must be held firmly.
Attach a large piece of felt to the wall, or use a felt board. The child can use felt shapes to make pictures. Magnetic boards can be used the same way.
Have the child work on a chalkboard, using chalk instead of a marker. Do the same kinds of tracing and modeling activities as suggested above.
Paint at an easel. Some of the modeling activities as suggested above can be done at the easel.
Magna Doodle- turn it upside down so that the erasing lever is on the . Experiment making vertical, horizontal, and parallel lines.

Ocular Motor Control
This refers to the ability of the eyes to work together to follow and hold an object in the line of vision as needed.
Use a flashlight against the ceiling. Have the child lie on his/her back or tummy and visually follow the moving light from left to right, to bottom, and diagonally.
Find hidden pictures in books. (There are special books for this.)
Maze activities.

Eye-hand Coordination
This involves accuracy in placement, direction, and spatial awareness.
Throw bean bags/kooshi balls into a hula hoop placed flat on the floor. Gradually increase the distance.
Play throw and catch with a ball . Start with a large ball and work toward a smaller ball. (Kooshi balls are easier to catch than a tennis ball.)
Practice hitting bowling pins with a ball. (You can purchase these games or make your own with pop bottles and a small ball.)
Play "Hit the Balloon" with a medium-sized balloon.

mrz Tue 28-Jun-11 17:07:04

Sorry missed some

When a certain amount of body stability has developed, the hands and fingers begin to work on movements of dexterity and isolation as well as different kinds of grasps. Children will develop fine motor skills best when they work on a VERTICAL or near vertical surface as much as possible. In particular, the wrist must be in extension. (Bent back in the direction of the hand)
Things to remember:

Upright working surfaces promote fine motor skills. Examples of these are: vertical chalkboards; easels for painting; flannel boards; lite bright; magnet boards (or fridge); windows and mirrors; white boards, etc. Children can also make sticker pictures; do rubber ink-stamping; use reuseable stickers to make pictures; complete puzzles with thick knobs; use magna-doodle and etch-a-sketch as well. The benefits for these include: having the child's wrist positioned to develop good thumb movements; they help develop good fine motor muscles; the child is using the arm and shoulder muscles.

Body Stability
The joints of the body need to be stable before the hands can be free to focus on specific skilled fine motor tasks.
Wheelbarrow walking, crab walking, and wall push-ups.
Toys: Orbiter, silly putty, and monkey bars on the playground.

Fine motor skills refer to the ability to use the smaller muscles in the body for precise tasks. These activities will help to develop fine motor skills for writing, drawing, using scissors, etc
Many school activities involve fine motor skills such as those listed above. Children with difficulties in this area may have:

• poor eye-hand coordination
• poor manipulative skills
• immature drawing skills
• poor handwriting and presentation skills
• some perceptual difficulties
• good auditory memory skills
• confidence as speakers and listeners
• good verbal comprehension skills
• strengths in verbal and non-verbal reasoning
• enjoyment in using multisensory strategies when learning.

Activities to develop fine motor skills

All these activities are general and can be used to develop fine motor skills for most children in your class. However, some children may need a much more specific programme of activities. Occupational therapists and physiotherapists will need to assess individual children's needs and advise on particular fine motor activities to address their specific difficulties.

Moulding and rolling play dough into balls - using the palms of the hands facing each other and with fingers curled slightly towards the palm.

Rolling play dough into tiny balls (peas) using only the finger tips.

Using pegs or toothpicks to make designs in play dough.

Cutting play dough with a plastic knife or with a pizza wheel by holding the implement in a diagonal volar grasp.

Tearing newspaper into strips and then crumpling them into balls. Use to stuff scarecrow or other art creation.

Scrunching up 1 sheet of newspaper in one hand. This is a super strength builder.

Using a plant sprayer to spray plants, (indoors, outdoors) to spray snow (mix food colouring with water so that the snow can be painted), or melt "monsters". (Draw monster pictures with markers and the colours will run when sprayed.)

Picking up objects using large tweezers such as those found in the "Bedbugs" game. This can be adapted by picking up Cheerios, small cubes, small marshmallows, pennies, etc., in counting games.

Shaking dice by cupping the hands together, forming an empty air space between the palms.

Using small-sized screwdrivers like those found in an erector set.

Lacing and sewing activities such as stringing beads, Cheerios, macaroni, etc.

Using eye droppers to "pick up" coloured water for colour mixing or to make artistic designs on paper.

Rolling small balls out of tissue paper, then gluing the balls onto construction paper to form pictures or designs.

Turning over cards, coins, checkers, or buttons, without bringing them to the edge of the table.

Making pictures using stickers or self-sticking paper reinforcements.

Playing games with the "puppet fingers" -the thumb, index, and middle fingers. At circle time have each child's puppet fingers tell about what happened over the weekend, or use them in songs and finger plays.

Place a variety of forms (eg. blocks, felt, paper, string, yarn, cereal, cotton) on outlines

Match shapes, colour, or pictures to a page and paste them within the outlines

Take a line for a walk – see how long the pencil can stay on the paper.
Sorting – small objects such as paper clips, screws, bolts, buttons, etc.
Clipping things together – using pegs, paper clips, etc.
Dressing up activities – involving the use of clothing fasteners such as buttons, zippers and laces.
Post-a-shape – matching shapes to the correct opening.
Tracking and maze activities
Cutting and pasting – patterns, pictures, classification activities, project scrapbooks.
Tracing – lines, shapes and simple pictures.
Copy writing patterns 1 – using coloured sand.
Copy writing patterns 2 – using chalk.
Colouring patterns and pictures – using different media.
Dot-to-dot pictures – using numbers and the alphabet.
Line-links – following the line from one end to the other (e.g. mouse to the cheese).
Modelling – with clay, Plasticine etc.
Painting and printing – using different sized brushes and different types of printing materials.
Jigsaw puzzles – starting with simple peg puzzles with pictures and shapes that need to be slotted into the correct space, then introducing traditional puzzles of varying degrees of difficulty.
Peg boards – these can be used to make simple or more complex patterns.
Building blocks – start with larger wooden ones if possible and then introduce smaller ones.
Constructional apparatus –of varying degrees of difficulty (e.g. Duplo, Lego).
Jacks or marbles – children learn to control fine motor movements with these games.
Computer-aided picture and design activities
Sewing activities
Construction activities – involving the use of plastic nuts, bolts and screws.
Musical instruments – playing as wide a range as available.
Attach a large piece of drawing paper to the wall. Have the child use a large marker and try the following exercises to develop visual motor skills:Make an outline of a one at a time. Have the child trace over your line from left to right, or from top to bottom. Trace each figure at least 10 times . Then have the child draw the figure next to your model several times.

Play connect the dots. Again make sure the child's strokes connect dots fromleft to right, and from top to bottom.

Trace around stencils - the non-dominant hand should hold the stencil flat and stable against the paper, while the dominant hand pushes the pencil firmly against the edge of the stencil. The stencil must be held firmly.

Attach a large piece of felt to the wall, or use a felt board. The child can use felt shapes to make pictures. Magnetic boards can be used the same way.

Have the child work on a chalkboard, using chalk instead of a marker. Do the same kinds of tracing and modeling activities as suggested above.

Paint at an easel. Some of the modeling activities as suggested above can be done at the easel.

Magna Doodle- turn it upside down so that the erasing lever is on the .

Experiment making vertical, horizontal, and parallel lines.

Self-Care Skills
Buttoning
Lacing
Tying
Fastening Snaps
Zipping
Carrying
Using a screwdriver
Locking and unlocking a door
Winding a clock
Opening and closing jars
Rolling out dough or other simple cooking activities
Washing plastic dishes
Sweeping the floor
Dressing
Scissor Activities
When scissors are held correctly, and when they fit a child's hand well, cutting activities will exercise the very same muscles which are needed to manipulate a pencil in a mature tripod grasp. The correct scissor position is with the thumb and middle finger in the handles of the scissors, the index finger on the outside of the handle to stabilize, with fingers four and five curled into the palm.
Cutting junk mail, particularly the kind of paper used in magazine subscription cards.

Making fringe on the edge of a piece of construction paper.

Cutting play dough or clay with scissors.

Cutting straws or shredded paper.

Cutting use a thick black line to guide cutting the following:
Cut off corners of a piece of paper
Cut along curved lines
Cut lines with a variety of angles
Cut figures with curves and angles
ACTIVITIES TO IMPROVE PRE-WRITING SKILLS
1. Wheelbarrow walking-child's hands are on floor, pick up feet and "walk" child on his/her hands.
2. Pouring from small pitcher to specific level in clear glass. Increase size of pitcher as strength increases.
3. Rope turning/jump rope
4. Slinky--shift back and forth with palm up.
5. Volleyball-type activities where hands, paddles, or rackets are in palm-up position. (Balloon volleyball)
6. Floor activities--large mural painting, floor puzzles, coloring when lying on stomach on floor.
7. Working on a vertical surface, especially above eye level. Activities can be mounted on a clip board or taped to surface or chalkboard/easel. Examples: pegboards, Lite Brite, Etch-a-sketch( upside down), Magna doodle, outlining, coloring, painting, writing.
8. Clothespins/pinching. Put letters on clothespins and spell words by clipping on edge of shoe box. Use a clothespin to do finger “push-ups” by using the pads of the thumb and index finger to open a clothespin and count repetitions.
9. Bead stringing/lacing with tip of finger against thumb
10. Inch a pencil or chopstick positioned in tripod grasp toward and away from palm. The shaft should rest in open web space.
11. Squirrel objects into palm (pick up with index finger and thumb, move into palm without using the other hand)
12. Squirt bottles.
13. Use tongs/tweezers to pick up blocks/small objects
14. Pennies into piggy bank or slot cut in plastic lid. Coins can also be put into slots cut in foam.
15. Finger plays/string games such as Cat's Cradle
16. Screw/unscrew lids
17. Squeeze sponges to wash off table, clean windows, shower, etc.
18. Playdough/silly putty activities
19. Pop bubble wrap
20. Use a turkey baster or nasal aspirator to blow cork or ping pong balls back and forth. These can also be used to squirt water to move floating object/toys.
21. Tear pieces of construction paper into small pieces and paste the different colors of paper on a simple picture from a coloring book, or make your own design.
22. Moving objects with tweezers—can use the large ones from Bed Bugs game or kitchen tongs.
23. Dot-dots, color by number, mazes

Ocular Motor Control
This refers to the ability of the eyes to work together to follow and hold an object in the line of vision as needed.
Use a flashlight against the ceiling. Have the child lie on his/her back or tummy and visually follow the moving light from left to right, to bottom, and diagonally.

Find hidden pictures in books. (There are special books for this.)

Maze activities.

Eye-hand Coordination
This involves accuracy in placement, direction, and spatial awareness.
Throw bean bags/kooshi balls into a hula hoop placed flat on the floor. Gradually increase the distance.

Play throw and catch with a ball . Start with a large ball and work toward a smaller ball. (Kooshi balls are easier to catch than a tennis ball.)

Practice hitting bowling pins with a ball. (You can purchase these games or make your own with pop bottles and a small ball.)
Play "Hit the Balloon" with a medium-sized balloon

Activities to develop gross motor skills
All these activities are general and can be used to develop gross motor coordination for most children in your class. However, some children may need a much more specific programme of activities. Occupational therapists and physiotherapists will need to assess the children's needs and advise on particular gross motor activities to address each child's specific difficulties.
Dodgems – ask the children to run around in different directions, making sure that they do not bump into each other. They need to dodge out of the way of each other. You can make this game more difficult by calling out 'Change' so that they have to change direction.
Stone cold – give each child a number, then ask them all to run around in different directions. If their number is called they have to stand still like a statue until the next number is called when they can move again.
Stepping stones – using small hoops as stepping stones, ask the children to 'cross the water' by jumping from one to the otehr without falling the 'water'.
Hopscotch – children can jump to being with until they feel confident with hopping.
Parachute games – ones that use the large muscle movements.
Climbing activities – using a range of large apparatus.
Balancing activities – using a range of both small and large apparatus.
Brain gym – some of the suggested activities invovle the coordinated movement of some of the large muscles.
Bean bag activities – a range of team games involving throwing bean bags at a target, or putting bean bags into a bucket, hoop, etc., or games involving kicking or throwing.
Ball games – a range of games involving rolling, kicking, throwing and catching.
Batting activities – a range of games involving the use of bats, sticks or racquets. These could be:
dribbling a ball around objects using a hockey stick
timing how long the children can keep a call in the air by batting it
putting aball into a specific position, using a putter or a hockey stick
paired games as in table tennis, racquet ball and short tennis
team games as in rounders, cricket and hockey.
Skipping activities – individual and group skipping games (e.g. 'Salt, mustard, vinegar, pepper').
Sensory Activities
The following activities ought to be done frequently to increase postural muscle strength and endurance. These activities also strengthen the child's awareness of his/her hands.

Wheelbarrow walking, crab walking

Clapping games (loud/quiet, on knees together, etc.)

Catching (clapping) bubbles between hands

Pulling off pieces of thera-putty with individual fingers and thumb

Drawing in a tactile medium such as wet sand, salt, rice, or "goop". Make "goop" by adding water to cornstarch until you have a mixture similar in consistency to toothpaste. The "drag" of this mixture provides feedback to the muscle and joint receptors, thus facilitating visual motor control.

Picking out small objects like pegs, beads, coins, etc., from a tray of salt, sand, rice, or putty. Try it with eyes closed too. This helps develop sensory awareness in the hands.
Midline Crossing
Establishment of hand dominance is still developing at this point. The following activities will facilitate midline crossing:
Encourage reaching across the body for materials with each hand. It may be necessary to engage the other hand in an activity to prevent switching hands at midline.

Refrain specifically from discouraging a child from using the left hand for any activity. Allow for the natural development of hand dominance by presenting activities at midline, and allowing the child to choose freely.

Start making the child aware of the left and right sides of his body through spontaneous comments like, "kick the ball with your right leg." Play imitation posture games like "Simon Says" with across the body movements.

When painting at easel, encourage the child to paint a continuous line across the entire paper- also from diagonal to diagonal.
Spatial Awareness
have poor presentation skills (can be unsure of how to arrange information on a page)
have difficulty with structuring and organising written work
have some visual perception difficulties
appear clumsy and bump into objects when moving around the classroom
have problems with positional language and be unable to tell left from right
have difficulty playing games or doing PE, using apparatus
have difficulty understanding abstract maths concepts, particularly in the areas of shape and space
have problems with reproducing patterns and shapes

Activities to develop spatial awareness skills:
Action songs – using different parts of the body.
Movement games – requiring the pupils to use space and position.
Following directions – during PE, games and other physical activities.
Line-walking – ask the pupils to walk along a line of chalk on the floor. Then ask them to walk along the left side of the line, then the right side of the line.
Follow the leader – put the pupils into groups of about eight. Then appoint one pupil as the leader. The others have to follow the leader and copy their actions as they go. Change the leader after a couple of minutes.
Climbing activities – using a range of large and small apparatus.
Balancing activities – using a range of both small and large apparatus.
Jigsaw puzzles – of varying degrees of difficulty to suit individual children.
Brain gym – some activities help to develop spatial awarenesss skils.
Draw a person – encourage the pupils to look carefully at the position of the features on a real person.
Patterns 1 – use dots as guidelines to reproduce a pattern.
Patterns 2 – multi-link pattern cards and other activities.
Footsteps – ask the pupils to arrange cardboard footprints for others in the group to follow. Ensure that each footprint is marked with either 'left' or 'right'.
Twister – a proprietory game in which pupils have to ensure that different parts of their body are touching spots on the Twister mat. This game helps to consolidate pupils' use of 'left' and 'right'.
Model-making – use a picture as a guide to building a model.
Tangrams – of varying degrees of difficulty.
Maps 1 – following directions on a map.
Maps 2 – giving directions for others to follow on a map.
Tessellation 1 – arranging 2D shapes.
Tessellation 2 – arranging and drawing around 2D shapes.
Activities to develop visual discrimination skills:
Sorting – colour, shape, size and texture.
Post-a-shape – matching shapes to the correct opening.
Matching silhouettes 1 – pictorial.
Matching silhouettes 2 – shapes.
Pairs 1 – matching objects, shapes and pictures.
Odd one out 1 – colour, shape, size.
Odd one out 2 – pictorial (apple, orange, banana, cup).
Pairs 2 – matching letters, using a choice of only four to six at first. try to avoid the letters that are easily confused like b, d and p. Introduce those letters gradually.
Pairs 3 – matching numerals, using a choice of only four or five at first.
Matching sequences – colour, shape and size.
Spot the difference – searching for visual similarities and differences between two pictures.
Mix and match – making three-part flip-books where heads, bodies and tails of animals can be interchanged.
Match the detail – matching a picture of a detail (such as a window) to the picture from whch the detail comes 9such as the house that has that window).
Shapewords – matching high frequency words to a shape outline.
Snap – matching a range of pictorial cards.
Lotto – matching word to word.
Dominoes – matching picture to picture or word to word.
Words to sentence matching.
Spot the difference – searching for visual similarities and differences in words.
Letter change (eg. cat, cot, cut).
Onset change (eg. sent, tent, went).
Odd word out – both oral and written (eg. hand, land, lend, stand).
Pelmanism 1 – rhyming picture pairs.
Pelmanism 2 – rhyming word pairs.
Wordsearches – using high frequency words or rhyming words.
Activities to develop visual memory skills:
Recall object features – let the pupils look at an object and talk about its features. Then take the object away and ask them to recall some of its features.
Recall picture details – let the pupils look at a picture and talk about the details. Then take the picture away and ask them to recall some of the details.
Complete the shape – show the pupils a shape and then give them an incomplete drawing of the same shape. Ask the pupils to complete the shape from memory.
Complete the picture – show the pupils a simple picture and then give them an incomplete drawing of the same picture. Ask them to complete the picture from memory.
What's missing? – show the pupils two similar pictures and ask them identify what is missing from one of the pictures.
Kim's game – place some everyday objects on a table. Show them to the pupils for about a minute, then cover them and see how many each can recall. This can also be played by taking one object away and asking the pupils to identify the object that is missing.
Pelmanism – shapes, objects, animals, etc.
Cause and effect – pictorial visual memory sequence.
Recall and sequence 1 – a series of three to four coloured shapes.
Recall and sequence 2 – a series of three to four pictures (eg. everyday situations, life sequences).
Recall and sequence 3 – a series of four pictures (telling a story).
What happens next? – complete pictorical action sequences related to everyday situations.
Recall and sequence 4 – a series of three to four words in a sentence.
Recall and sequence 5 – the alphabet, using magnetic letters.
Recall and sequence 6 – the days of the week using magnetic words.
Recall and sequence 7 – magnetic numbers.
Word bingo – simple high frequency words.
Visual memory spelling games – using the look, cover, remember, write, check strategy with simple high frequency words.
Activities to develop visual perception skills:
Post-a-shape – matching shapes to the correct opening.
Feely bag – ask the pupils to describe a shape or object by feeling it without looking, then describe it again when they can see it.
Copying 1 – a shape pattern or picture, using a magnetic board and pieces.
What's missing? 1 – complete a 2D shape.
What's missing? 2 – complete a picture.
Guess what? – ask the pupils to guess the object when only part is visible. A picture of an object could be cut into four pieces and only one part given at a time until the children have guessed what it is.
Object/picture matching – using everyday objects.
Jigsaw puzzles – of varying degrees of difficulty to suit individual pupils.
Matching shape to silhouette – using the correct orientation.
Matching picture to silhouette – using the correct orientation.
Draw a person – ask the pupils to copy the features of a real person, then compare.
Copying 2 – 2D shape patterns and pictures of varying degrees of difficulty.
Colouring 1 – symmetrical patterns of varying degrees of difficulty to suit individual pupils.
Colouring 2 – symmetrical pictures of varying derees of difficulty to suit individual pupils.
Tessellation 1 – arranging magnetic 2D shapes on a board.
Tessellation 2 – drawing around 2D shapes.
Sensory maze activities – using a variety of materials.
PE activities – involving directional and positional language. Use symbols as a reminder.
Multi-link pattern cards – and similar activities.
Instructions – follow auditory instructions while using a diagram or picture, to show how to build a model.
Noughts and crosses – using plastic or wooden pieces.
Computer-aided picture and design activities.
Brain gym – some activities help to develop perceptual skills.

Peanuts33 Tue 28-Jun-11 20:53:08

Wow. Thank you Mrz. Lots for me to read thru. Will print it off and read it carefully tomorrow. Thank you once again.

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