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6 weeks pregnant with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS)...any advice?

(4 Posts)
user1470147116 Wed 04-Oct-17 09:19:55

I’ve had 3 chemical pregnancies. I’ve been diagnosed with antiphospholipid syndrome.

I’m now nearly 6 weeks pregnant.

I have appointment with rheumatologist tomorrow.

Just trying to do some research so I have questions prepared..

Has anyone else has antiphospholipid syndrome in pregnancy?

My questions are:

- how will my pregnancy be managed? Am I more likely to be induced or have a c section?

- How often will I be seeing the rheumatologist during my pregnancy to get my blood tested?

- I’m currently on aspirin and heparin. Will the dose be increased or decreased during my pregnancy depending on the level of anticardiolipin antibodies in my blood?

- how does diet effect antiphospholipid syndrome? I don’t want to take any pregnancy supplements that have vitamin K in them. Vitamin K helps blood to clot so surely this is not good for me? Are goods that are hight in Vitamin K e.g. spinach, broccoli bad too? What foods are blood thinners?

Any advice/ tips to give?

user1470147116 Wed 04-Oct-17 15:09:30

anyone?

tigerdog Wed 04-Oct-17 18:15:05

I have borderline anticardiolipin antibodies and that means I have had the same treatment as someone with full blown APS. I've also had three losses - at 5 weeks, 8 weeks and 11 weeks.

My experience was that I didn't see a rheumatologist, but instead was seen in the recurrent miscarriage clinic between 6-11 weeks for regular scans and to review my medication. I was prescribed aspirin and clexane. I had bleeding at 7-10 weeks so was advised to stop the aspirin at that point but restarted it at 17 weeks.

I'm still midwife led at the moment but I saw a haematologist for a review at 16 weeks. He has continued my medication. I think generally you will continue on the same dose throughout (which is standard for everyone), and until 6 weeksnpost partum unless you have bleeding, at which point they review you and discuss what to do. I have not had any retests, as they will keep me on the drugs regardless, and I don't think they typically test again once you're pregnant.

I don't know if it makes a difference to how the pregnancy is managed - so far it hasn't for me as such - once I left the recurrent miscarriage clinic care, I've only had one extra appointment with the haematologist. I see a consultant at 20 weeks so things might change. I don't think there is any reason per se why they would give you a c-section or induce but obviously they would do that if they need to if there were obvious clotting issues affecting the placenta for example.

I've not been told any thing specific about diet at all. I take pregnacare max and eat various foods including brocolli etc although weirdly I have gone off almost all greens like spinach and kale so eating much less of them than I used to - it could be my body trying to tell me something. I doubt that any of them in small quantities can do any harm.

No advice really otherwise - just to wish good luck!

PenelopePuddleduck Thu 05-Oct-17 05:43:25

I'm also 6 weeks with aps. I'm on aspirin but not allowed to start heparin until my scan confirms an intrauterine pregnancy. The scan is this week so fingers crossed. I did beg to be seen earlier but was told no so I'm hoping the aspirin has been working until then.

I think it differs between areas though as I don't see a rheumatologist, just the consultant that I saw during my recurrent miscarriage tests. They haven't mentioned anything about testing blood during pregnancy. I get the impression everyone gets the standard dose.

They did however say I would get growth scans later on and be induced at 38 weeks or before depending on those scans.

The Hughes syndrome section of the healthunlocked website is really useful for all aps related stuff. Would be interesting to hear what the rheumatologist tells you.

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