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The tack room

How much would you pay for loan pony?

38 replies

Indoorvoicesbluey · 16/01/2024 12:17

been full Loaning said pony for 2 years.

shes 13 years old and 14.2hh. My 16 year old has been riding her, and her younger sister has started lessons on her. When we got her she had barely been sat on let alone knew anything. We’ve spent a lot of money bringing her on and absolutely loving her. Shes a darling but still very green as in couldn’t go round a course of jumps yet but has started doing 30-60cm on there own. Typical cob that she struggles to hold a canter.

shes not got a bad bone in her body, but we suspect ulcers and she’s on acid ease which is making a difference.

we’ve had to buy saddle, rugs, everything.

owner wants to sell said pony. What would you pay?

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Indoorvoicesbluey · 16/01/2024 15:08

Ah yeah, we had a shit trainer for the first 18 months who believed in spurs and whippping her a lot which obviously didn’t do anything and as first time owners we trusted this older lady.

we moved yards and found an amazing woman who has put so much time and effort into pony in the last 4-5 months, and that’s how said pony has started jumping etc. not a whip or spur in sight. We had to “go back to basics”.

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gwenneh · 16/01/2024 15:08

If you've been working with a horse for two years and they still aren't balanced enough to hold a canter for a short distance when asked to work appropriately, that still indicates an issue. It doesn't take a very long or involved fitness programme to teach a horse how to balance in the canter - so either there is a muscular or skeletal issue which you have not yet seen through an x-ray, or the training/riding hasn't been enough to put that basic level of conditioning on the horse and doesn't add to the horse's value.

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Wotchaz · 16/01/2024 15:25

If you’re a good loaner and have put time and money into the pony I would expect any decent seller to give you a discount off market value for the peace of mind that the pony will have a good life and reduced hassle factor. I’ve just bought my loan horse for a very reasonable value, and should the people loaning my other horse want to buy him at any point, I certainly wouldn’t push for a high price.

Remember that it’ll cost the owner time and money to sell the pony to someone else if you don’t buy it, there’s no guarantee that they’d get the price they want and they’ll have to keep up fitness while they sell. Don’t offer more than you think he’s worth, and IMO that’s nowhere near £6k. Having said that, I share other posters’ concerns re long term soundness if there’s that much trouble maintaining a canter.

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maxelly · 16/01/2024 16:29

This is the trouble with loaning a green or project pony (which is often of course all that's available so not blaming you), unless it's a clear LWVTB with an agreed purchase price at the outset that reflects market value of the horse before the loaner invests time and money into it, then you're always at risk of the owner selling on for full market value once horse is more established/back in work and thus profiting off the loaner's work (it would be nice to give a discount but they're under no obligation).

To come back to your original question, much does depend on whether she's a quality type, pretty with nice markings etc and if genuinely fully sound or if she's a bit wonky, has any blemishes or concerning medical history etc. Also if she's a fully bombproof hack, will walk trot and canter politely in open spaces, alone and in company, in front and in rear without getting silly or strong or bucking or pissing off - sensible solid hacks will always command a certain price point even if they've barely seen the inside of a school, plenty of people just want to hack or to potter about in the school so as long as she isn't spooky or has significant vices I would have thought her value is anywhere between £4k-£7.5k.

The money you've spent on saddles etc and lessons sadly irrelevant - if they've assessed market value as £6k have they given you a discount figure in mind or have they said that's £6k to you? Really you're making a moral appeal to the owners better nature and the good home you can guarantee etc so I'd play heavily on that if you can.

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Postapocalypticcowgirl · 17/01/2024 20:38

Indoorvoicesbluey · 16/01/2024 13:02

She wants 6k min

IMO not worth that if she's not ready to go out round a course of jumps and struggles to canter in the school.

I'd say closer to 4k as is assuming she is safe to hack etc. However, it sounds like your daughter has put lots of work into her, and a reasonable owner would take that into account when pricing.

The problem is, the owner could probably sell the pony on the open market, and if they stretch the truth a bit, could achieve 5-6k potentially. If they only care about the money, that's what they'd do.

How is your relationship with the owner? What can you afford in terms of buying the pony? How would your DDs feel if she was sold?

Having been the kid in this situation, I'd potentially end up paying over the odds to keep her.

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Littlebitpsycho · 20/01/2024 19:46

Interesting...the owner wants 6k (not worth that if it won't hack alone and can't even canter by the way) but it was in the field for years beforehand and you've put in ALL the work, thus making it worth more than it would have been sat in the field?

I appreciate the owner can sell the horse at any time but you'd think they'd be willing to negotiate given your work has made the pony what it is 🤷‍♀️

I'd be keeping all the tack and rugs you've bought for it (or she can buy them off you)

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liveforsummer · 25/01/2024 16:06

This pony is 13 and more green than my 4 yo despite having all that work put in including several months by a professional. Mines been entirely backed and broken by my 13 and 10 yo. I'd not pay more than a couple of grand for that! Of you have £6k to spare you could get something your dd can go much further on. I'm not sure how successful you'll be breaking the hacking issue at 13 either. Well established habits aren't easy to turn around

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Indoorvoicesbluey · 26/02/2024 11:48

Thought I’d update.

paid £5k.

but my god this last month we have turned a huge corner. We’ve changed trainers (mega awkward because both are on our yard and I feel awful) and pony is like a different pony!

did her first course of 80cm at the weekend and smashed it, half in Trot but the other half she held a canter. Her canter transitions are bloody amazing, she can easily go walk to canter now ☺️


figured she absolutely loves jumping 😂

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OrlandointheWilderness · 26/02/2024 12:01

Lovely update, thank you!

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Indoorvoicesbluey · 26/02/2024 12:12

We changed her saddle and girth and I think that’s helped massively x

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MyopicBunny · 27/02/2024 11:39

Where I live, you can get a nice, reliable cob for much less than £6k but I'm not anywhere near London. Around here, £7k plus is what you'd pay for a Connemara.

I'm glad that things have turned a corner since you bought her. There is no reason why a cob shouldn't be able to hold a canter ime :)

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RedPony1 · 29/02/2024 14:06

Indoorvoicesbluey · 26/02/2024 11:48

Thought I’d update.

paid £5k.

but my god this last month we have turned a huge corner. We’ve changed trainers (mega awkward because both are on our yard and I feel awful) and pony is like a different pony!

did her first course of 80cm at the weekend and smashed it, half in Trot but the other half she held a canter. Her canter transitions are bloody amazing, she can easily go walk to canter now ☺️


figured she absolutely loves jumping 😂

Great!!

My first thought when you said a 13 year old pony who's had 2 years consistent work couldn't hold canter was that it's either the rider and/or trainer. Glad you've switched and its worked.

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WhatHeSaid33 · 29/02/2024 14:13

Whoops! Hadn’t read through. Well done!

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