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Is it true that Scottish students are not allowed to go home for weekends etc as it counts as mixing households?

(110 Posts)
Treesofwood Thu 24-Sep-20 15:54:52

Before we even move on to MHs dastardly plan to keep them all in halls over Christmas.
I know there is the option to detain people under the Coronavirus act if they are believed to be infectious, but these students are mostly not.
What would happen if an ill studeng tried to return home to parents? Fines? Or seen as reasonable and overlooked?

OP’s posts: |
emmathedilemma Thu 24-Sep-20 15:58:14

It would appear not: www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-54281903

Treesofwood Thu 24-Sep-20 16:04:36

Sounds like it's not been very well thought about at all. Lots of confused messages

OP’s posts: |
Rosehip10 Thu 24-Sep-20 16:07:24

Grow up - we are talking about (supposedly) intelligent young adults here - if anyone has an infectious illness they should not be shooting off home to mummy and daddy.

Any yes, students have to follow the law of the land (in this case Scotland) same as everyone else.

Batshitbeautycosmeticsltd Thu 24-Sep-20 16:07:37

Jason Leitch seems to think so. But he can go and fuck himself.

NameChange9824 Thu 24-Sep-20 16:09:36

Some of those students will be 16 years old, many will be 17. That seems young to me to be told "no contact with your family".

Batshitbeautycosmeticsltd Thu 24-Sep-20 16:09:48

Rosehip10

Grow up - we are talking about (supposedly) intelligent young adults here - if anyone has an infectious illness they should not be shooting off home to mummy and daddy.

Any yes, students have to follow the law of the land (in this case Scotland) same as everyone else.

It's a fucking dorm, not a prison cell.

rainbowunicorn Thu 24-Sep-20 16:29:45

Nobody will adhere to this. My child is in private halls where they have their own studio to themselves. This means that they can form an extended household with us which is what the will be doing. To be honest with you even if this was not the case I very much doubt that many people will take any notice of this.

Treesofwood Thu 24-Sep-20 16:34:17

Rainbowunicorn So if they have a key on the door to their rooms could they all count as lone adults and able to join a bubble?Problem is some people will be genuinely frightened to break the law and won't just ignore it.
Surely 16 and 17 year olds are legally children and able to move between parents, so therefore from uni accommodation to parents.

OP’s posts: |
StatisticalSense Thu 24-Sep-20 16:34:26

This is a complete and utter joke and yet again shows the contempt shown by Nicola Sturgeon towards teenagers and young adults. I hope that people will hold her to account for each and every suicide that this move will undoubtedly cause. It is nonsensical to classify students in halls of residence as in anything other than a single person household (students living with friends of their own choice in private accommodation are a different matter and also will be better equipped to stay at uni for the medium term) considering the numbers who don't ever get along with the strangers they are forced to live with so it is pure spite to exclude students from the rules regarding extended households. The need for those who have just moved away from home for the first time into unfamiliar environments to be able to spend time with family is unquestionably greater than the needs of single parents to do so which she is happy to allow.

ImperfectTents Thu 24-Sep-20 16:38:23

I didn't go home at weekends when I was at uni. They will be fine, they have FaceTime etc

Porcupineinwaiting Thu 24-Sep-20 16:38:33

@rainbowunicorn that's a bit sad. Wont he be wanting to mix with friends at college?

Dn has just started uni. He wont be back and forwarding home during term time as he wants to socialize with his new friends and flatmates and doesnt want to risk carrying home a little present to mum and dad.

Ffsnosexallowed Thu 24-Sep-20 16:39:24

To be really blunt, maybe if they hadn't been going against the guidance and thinking they were somehow immune to covid we wouldn't be having the huge numbers we've got now.

I feel so bad for them though, they should never have been encouraged to physically return to uni. Dp is a lecturer at an affected uni- just away in to give a face to face which no-one will turn up for anyway.

Porcupineinwaiting Thu 24-Sep-20 16:42:55

Not sure I agree @Ffsnosexallowed I would hope most would be happier at uni rather than stuck at home with mum and dad - but then I come from a time when it was rare for anyone to go home during term time.

There does seem to be a lot more angst about this amongst parents than students.

shoofle Thu 24-Sep-20 16:44:17

Do the majority of students really go home at the weekend on the regular?

Ffsnosexallowed Thu 24-Sep-20 16:47:09

@porcupineinwaiting so do you think it was reasonable to get them back when there is little to no face to face teaching, to have them paying for accommodation etc, when halls were known to be a risky environment and outbreaks would be inevitable, when there are now outbreaks putting wider communities at risk just because they'd prefer to be there rather than at home????

Treesofwood Thu 24-Sep-20 16:48:04

I think the point is its effectively illegal. Not how many times it might happen

OP’s posts: |
shoofle Thu 24-Sep-20 16:51:07

I work in a university and it was university policy to be ambivalent about whether or not there would be face to face teaching, to encourage students to attend, pay for accommodation etc. Universities are businesses first and foremost, sadly.

That said, at that age I definitely prioritised socialising over hanging out at the weekends with my mum and dad!

Batshitbeautycosmeticsltd Thu 24-Sep-20 16:55:10

shoofle

Do the majority of students really go home at the weekend on the regular?

I used to go home at weekends to meet up with old friends who'd also come home to meet up.

Ffsnosexallowed Thu 24-Sep-20 16:55:34

At the minute they can't socialise though. They are subject to the same restrictions the rest of us are. 500 are self isolating here. That means sitting in a room pretty much by yourself for 2 weeks?

covidnickname Thu 24-Sep-20 17:00:37

I went home every weekend - but I had serious MH issues .

I’m assuming most students in that position now - eg carers, disabilities - will just drop out .

DFriend has son with T1DB that frequently requires hospital/ambulance etc, she’s said she’d refuse him to go altogether - can’t take the risk of him ending up seriously ill and not being allowed any family help .

ApolloandDaphne Thu 24-Sep-20 17:02:30

Treesofwood

Rainbowunicorn So if they have a key on the door to their rooms could they all count as lone adults and able to join a bubble?Problem is some people will be genuinely frightened to break the law and won't just ignore it.
Surely 16 and 17 year olds are legally children and able to move between parents, so therefore from uni accommodation to parents.

In Scotland at age 16/17 young people are deemed to be adults not children.

Porcupineinwaiting Thu 24-Sep-20 17:07:19

@Ffsnosexallowed of course they can socialize, under the same constraints as the rest of us. And yes I do think they should have gone back. Not all unis are just doing remote teaching, at uni they have access to facilities such as labs and libraries and gyms. Uni teams are playing again.

And there's company at uni, more so than at home for many. Certainly both my dns are pleased to have gone back.

mosscarpet Thu 24-Sep-20 17:08:05

Ffsnosexallowed

To be really blunt, maybe if they hadn't been going against the guidance and thinking they were somehow immune to covid we wouldn't be having the huge numbers we've got now.

I feel so bad for them though, they should never have been encouraged to physically return to uni. Dp is a lecturer at an affected uni- just away in to give a face to face which no-one will turn up for anyway.

not sure that untrue stereoptypical generalisations like that are especially helpful. I have teenagers and young adults. every single one of them has stuck absolutely to the guidance throughout.
My dd has returned to her thrid year in uni, and will generally be fine not coming home until Christmas (and yes, she absolutely WILL be coming home for Christmas!), she is now in a house with freinds. However, she had a really tough year in her first year. Struggled with MH issues, really didnt get on with people she ended up with in halls etc and very much did need to come home form time to time at weekends. I feel desperately sorry for all those that may be struggling in any way this year, to now be told they cant even see their families, espcially considering how restricted things at uni are anyway currently.
My other dd is about to start hir first year at a different uni, and I do wonder how she will get on.
Its an absolute bloody travesty what young people have been faced to endure this year,we have had cancelled GCSEs, A levels, results fiasco, UCAS stress, cancelled proms etc, not seeing any freinds for months, no summer jobs available so no savings for year ahead at uni, mine finishing uni with no idea about next moves - will there even be any jobs, and now people have decided they are all somehow single handedly responsible for the mess the country is in angry

Porcupineinwaiting Thu 24-Sep-20 17:09:54

@covidnickname not necessarily. Not everyone's mental health is improved by being with their parents.

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